Is it ok to make protein-shakes with 2 1/2 scoops of whey protein?

  1. Banned
    warvictim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    73
    Rep Power
    0
    Level
    8
    Lv. Percent
    14.09%

    Is it ok to make protein-shakes with 2 1/2 scoops of whey protein?


    Hello all, i would like to know how many scoops of whey-protein do you put in your protein shakes in your blender? I ask this because i have increased the amount of scoops i put in my shakes. I used to pour 1 1/2 scoops, now i make my night whey protein shakes, with 2 1/2 scoops of whey protein with milk, which is about 68 grams of protein


    warvictim

  2. New Member
    Neil5585's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  230 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    310
    Rep Power
    240
    Level
    14
    Lv. Percent
    64.38%

    Whey protein is a poor protein for before bed. At the least you should have a 50/50 blend of whey and micellar casein.

    Also be careful depending on your goals and your body because milk causes a lot of insulin to be secreted.

    But to answer the question, that seems like excessive protein given that it's almost all whey. If it were at least 50% casein I'd say it's good.
  3. Banned
    warvictim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    73
    Rep Power
    0
    Level
    8
    Lv. Percent
    14.09%

    Hey i have a question. You mean milk from whey? Because whey protein itself doesn't have any carbohydrates, so how can whey protein increase insulin levels if most whey protein powders are real low in carbs.

    warvictim

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil5585 View Post
    Whey protein is a poor protein for before bed. At the least you should have a 50/50 blend of whey and micellar casein.

    Also be careful depending on your goals and your body because milk causes a lot of insulin to be secreted.

    But to answer the question, that seems like excessive protein given that it's almost all whey. If it were at least 50% casein I'd say it's good.
    •   
       

  4. Banned
    warvictim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    73
    Rep Power
    0
    Level
    8
    Lv. Percent
    14.09%

    Hello again: here is a small article where it says that whey protein actually decreases insulin levels. I think it increases glucagon levels (The fat burning hormone)

    http://www.wheyoflife.org/benefits.cfm

    Weight Management
    Studies show that achieving and maintaining a healthy weight can add years to your life and help prevent weight related complications, including diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. Diet plays a key role in any weight management program and adding whey protein often helps make a positive difference. Here are some of the reasons why.
    The body requires more energy to digest protein than other foods (thermic effect) and as a result you burn more calories after a protein meal.
    Whey protein isolate is pure protein with little to no fat or carbohydrates. It is a perfect complement to any low carbohydrate or low glycemic index diet plan.
    Recent studies by Dr. Donald Layman, a professor at the University of Illinois, have highlighted the role of the essential amino acid leucine in improving body composition. High quality whey protein is rich in leucine to help preserve lean muscle tissue while promoting fat loss. Whey protein contains more leucine than milk protein, egg protein and soy protein.
    Protein helps to stabilize blood glucose levels by slowing the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. This in turn reduces hunger by lowering insulin levels and making it easier for the body to burn fat.
    Whey protein contains bioactive components that help stimulate the release of two appetite-suppressing hormones: cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In support of this, a new study found that whey protein had a greater impact on satiety than casein, the other protein in milk. Adding whey protein to a mid-day snack or beverage provides healthy energy and may help control food intake at the next meal.
    return to menu


    warvictim


    Quote Originally Posted by Neil5585 View Post
    Whey protein is a poor protein for before bed. At the least you should have a 50/50 blend of whey and micellar casein.

    Also be careful depending on your goals and your body because milk causes a lot of insulin to be secreted.

    But to answer the question, that seems like excessive protein given that it's almost all whey. If it were at least 50% casein I'd say it's good.
  5. Banned
    warvictim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    73
    Rep Power
    0
    Level
    8
    Lv. Percent
    14.09%

    Hello here is another article i found on the web about Glucagon and Insulin and how do we stimulate glucagon (The fat burning hormone):

    http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache...nk&cd=16&gl=us

    How do you lower insulin and increase glucagon through nutrition? The key is to eat in a manner that keeps your blood sugar stable. In keeping your blood sugar stable, you control the excess release of insulin. Excess insulin is secreted every time you "over-carb." Whenever you eat sugar or processed carbohydrates, or simply too many carbohydrates for your body, (because all carbohydrates break down into blood sugar called glucose) you will have excess glucose in your blood stream, causing your blood sugar to spike. In turn, your pancreas secretes insulin. Insulin is your body's most powerful storage hormone. Insulin totally blocks your body's ability to burn fat, converts all the excess blood sugar into triglycerides (blood fats), and stores these fats in your fat cells. Glucagon is released every time you eat lean protein. Glucagon, when present in your blood steam, also lowers insulin levels. It is important to eat lean protein every single meal.

    When faced with high cholesterol (over 200 total cholesterol), most patients are recommended a statin drug, along with a reduced fat/high carbohydrate diet. Lowering unhealthy fat intake decreases LDL levels. But, increasing carbohydrate content causes HDL (good cholesterol) to drop and triglycerides and total cholesterol to increase, which means increased risk of heart disease.

    To control the balance of glucagon and insulin, eat a healthy balance of lean protein, good fats/oils (containing essential fats omega 3 and 6), and unprocessed carbohydrates at each meal. Avoid sugar, white flour, and other processed carbohydrates; and always combine carbohydrates with lean protein and/or good fats/oils. This slows the gastric emptying of the carbohydrates, preventing a blood sugar spike and controlling the excessive release of insulin. Staying hydrated with pure water and avoiding caffeine and other dehydrators is also of integral importance. In addition to these nutrition guidelines, exercise regularly and follow a basic supplementation program. When you adopt these healthy lifestyle habits, you will find your cholesterol levels will return to healthy levels (180-200 total cholesterol, under 100 LDL, and over 50 HDL) within 60-90 days, without prescription medication!
  6. New Member
    Neil5585's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  230 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    310
    Rep Power
    240
    Level
    14
    Lv. Percent
    64.38%

    Whey protein itself causes a release of insulin, because of the speed mostly but also the amino content. Amino acids and protein can raise insulin levels, even with zero carbs. However it's not the same as insulin from carbs alone.

    What I meant was milk by itself causes a large release of insulin. It has a low glycemic index but causes a very large overall release of insulin in response to it.
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-20-2010, 01:53 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-18-2008, 12:29 AM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-03-2008, 08:24 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-17-2005, 07:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in