'Any kind of exercise' helps diabetes - AnabolicMinds.com

'Any kind of exercise' helps diabetes

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    'Any kind of exercise' helps diabetes

    AAP

    09-18-07

    Weight training works just as well as running on a treadmill or biking to help the most important symptom of type-2 diabetes - long-term control of blood sugar - Canadian researchers say.

    Doing both aerobic and resistance training lowered blood sugar levels better than either alone, researchers said - and both appeared to be safe.

    At least 194 million people worldwide have diabetes, and the World Health Organisation expects the number to rise to more than 300 million by 2025.

    Most have type-2 diabetes, caused by a combination of genetic predisposition, lack of exercise and rich diet.

    Exercise - the type that makes people breathe a little heavily - is known to reduce the risk of type-2 diabetes and can improve the body's control of sugar. But there were doubts about the safety and effectiveness of weight training.

    Dr. Ronald Sigal of University of Calgary and colleagues at the University of Ottawa studied 251 people with type-2 diabetes aged 39 to 70. None exercised regularly.

    They assigned them to one of four groups - one that did 45 minutes of aerobic training three times a week, another doing the same amount of resistance training, a group that did both, for a total of an hour and a half of exercise three days a week, and a fourth group that did no extra exercise.

    The exercisers used treadmills or exercise bikes, or weight machines, at a health club. The volunteers liked the exercise and stuck with it, Sigal said.

    "I think there is a widespread cynicism even among medical people that people will actually exercise," Sigal said in a telephone interview.

    They were given a diet to follow that should have prevented any weight loss, and then their blood sugar, cholesterol, weight and other vital statistics were measured.

    Blood sugar levels fell with exercise and most importantly, haemoglobin A1c, which measures the blood sugar average for the past 3 months, fell by half a point on average in the people who did one form of exercise and a full point in those who did both.

    A1c should be between 4 and 6 but the patients started out with A1c values ranging from 6.6 to 9.9, Sigal's team wrote in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

    A one point drop in A1c is associated with a 15 percent to 20 percent decrease in major cardiovascular events such as heart attack or stroke and a 37 percent reduction in complications such as kidney, eyes and limb damage.

    "There were some who brought their A1c into the normal range," Sigal said. Some also were able to lower their doses of medications and many lost weight and body fat.

    "Imagine an inexpensive pill that could decrease the haemoglobin A1c value by 1 percentage point, reduce cardiovascular death by 25 percent, and substantially improve functional capacity (strength, endurance, and bone density)," Dr. William Kraus of Duke Medical School and Dr. Benjamin Levine of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center wrote in a commentary.

    They said doctors should prescribe exercise to every diabetes patient.

    AAP reserves all rights, including copyright, in services provided by it. The information, text and images in the service are for personal use only and may not be re-written, copied, re-sold or re-distributed, framed, linked or otherwise used whether for compensation of any kind or not, without the prior written permission of AAP.

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    Nice

    Dr.'s would never prescribe exercise unless they had shares / kickbacks from the gyms....no not all Dr's but most wouldn't.

    Much Love,

    Neoborn
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    Quote Originally Posted by neoborn View Post
    Nice

    Dr.'s would never prescribe exercise unless they had shares / kickbacks from the gyms....no not all Dr's but most wouldn't.

    Much Love,

    Neoborn
    The first thing any physician says to a diabetes (or even overweight) patient is that they need to start exercising and watching what they eat. Just ask a fat relative.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwyckemynd00 View Post
    The first thing any physician says to a diabetes (or even overweight) patient is that they need to start exercising and watching what they eat. Just ask a fat relative.
    Oh, I stand corrected. They are basically on the Pharmaceuticals payrolls no? They may say that, and then hit you up with a $50 or more prescription.....they know you're gonna pop a pill rather than exercise. I mean these people didn't get this way ( like myself ) from too much healthy activity eh?



    I used to work as tech support for a software company that basically was an all in one Dr's office software. It was sickening some of the stuff I heard. Patients are paycheques ( no not all docs but the majority ).

    Much Love,

    Neoborn
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    Physicians do get compensated much like many other business owners do for using products. That's just life. But just because someone gets compensated for using products doesn't mean they're going to screw their client (or in this case, patient). Most of these products are just alternatives to another product.

    And, if it was sooooo easy just to get a physicians to write you a prescription, I challenge you to see your general practitioner and get thyroid hormone prescribed to you because you need to lose some weight. This is what he'll say: Well...lets look at that bloodwork...oh...its fine. You:I still wanna lose weight. Him Go to the gym.
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    I guess we just see two different sides of the same coin. I see the money grabbing, pharmaceuticals running them and people treated as $$$'s or basically like cattle, you see Dr's doing a great job and just getting paid their worth.

    Either way,

    Much Love,

    Neoborn
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    Yeah, true. Its all good.

    Don't get me wrong, I know there are idiot doctors out there. I'd say there are too many who get into it solely for the money / "status". Hell, I hear horror stories sometimes regarding doctors who may are NOT board certified in things like plastic surgery, etc, killing people.

    But, my experience has been that most doctors are generally looking for a way to get their patients the best treatment. Lets also not forget that even though they're in the business of making people feel better they're still in business; its their livelihood and its hardly wrong to look to make enough money to make up for the 8yrs of school (minimum, probably more like 9-10 for most people) and 3-5yrs of residency + $150,000 debt they put into their career choice.
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    Yes Doctors will treat these people with drugs. They get kickbacks from the pharmaceutical companies. There is no money in a cure, so they don't want a cure, just a medication to treat the patient which will mask("treat" in a doctors eyes) the symptoms of an illness. Of course the doctor will tell them to exercise, thats "the right thing to do". Doctors don't treat people, they treat symptoms.
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    Having a cure doesn't stop the disease from existing. It just means that once it exists you can fix it. There is money in a cure.

    Where the hell do you get this retarded "doctors don't treat people, they treat symptoms" mentality? What is a doctor supposed to do, rub a person's back and tell them everything is gonna be alright? Is that "treating a person". They have to approach diseases methodically by [I know, you'd never guess it] examining symptoms! Wow...that's novel, right? Oh wait, its not is it? That's exactly what every "fix it" person does. Mechanics, computer repair techs, plumbers, engineers, etc, they all look at the symptom's of the thing they're examining and methodically develop a way to fix it (or so they hope).

    Yes people, medical care is expensive, but that doesn't mean that all (or even a majority) of physicians are sticking it to everyone because they see people as money.

    Oh, and regarding pharmaceutical companies/doctors not wanting "cures". I hate to break it to you all, but largely cures/treatments/etc stem largely from academic research facilities! Do these facilities have a reason not to want to find cures? No, of course not.

    On that note, I actually know quite a number of personnel from large pharmaceutical companies due to the research that the academic research facility that I'm part of performs. While most of these companies are looking to turn a profit, they are concerned with the well-being of people. Hell, not long ago Genetech released a drug which they thought was safe and had invested countless millions of dollars into. One person died and they took it off the market far before the FDA would have recommended they do so and took the huge loss. Why? They didn't want people dying from their drug. They didn't try to make some of their money back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwyckemynd00 View Post
    Having a cure doesn't stop the disease from existing. It just means that once it exists you can fix it. There is money in a cure.

    Where the hell do you get this retarded "doctors don't treat people, they treat symptoms" mentality? What is a doctor supposed to do, rub a person's back and tell them everything is gonna be alright? Is that "treating a person". They have to approach diseases methodically by [I know, you'd never guess it] examining symptoms! Wow...that's novel, right? Oh wait, its not is it? That's exactly what every "fix it" person does. Mechanics, computer repair techs, plumbers, engineers, etc, they all look at the symptom's of the thing they're examining and methodically develop a way to fix it (or so they hope).

    Yes rubbing someones back and telling them that its going to be ok would be a start. Its called bedside manner,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedside_manner

    Computers, Automobiles, and Toilets are somewhat different than actual people. Also when I say they treat symptoms I mean exactly that. They are treating just the symptom with a drug, not the person. In other words they would not go into details of the persons lifestyle to find out what caused or is causing the symptoms. For instance the fat phucks that get gastric bypass surgery- even though these people eat like crap and have a poor attitude the doctor still gives them the surgery. The cut them open and staple their stomach instead of telling them to diet and exercise!. The problem with these people is it is all in their head, its their atitude. They are still gonna eat like crap and not exercise, so the problem isn't "solved", it is just "covered up"....You mention mechanics that fix the symptom...A mechanic who just replaces a part to fix a problem isn't a mechanic at all, just a "parts replacer". What I'm saying is you have to get to the root of the problem otherwise it still exists. If the mechanic just replaces the part and doesn't know why it failed, then its likely to just fail again and again.........
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    Quote Originally Posted by T-Bone View Post
    Also when I say they treat symptoms I mean exactly that. They are treating just the symptom with a drug, not the person. In other words they would not go into details of the persons lifestyle to find out what caused or is causing the symptoms. For instance the fat phucks that get gastric bypass surgery- even though these people eat like crap and have a poor attitude the doctor still gives them the surgery. The cut them open and staple their stomach instead of telling them to diet and exercise!. The problem with these people is it is all in their head, its their atitude. They are still gonna eat like crap and not exercise, so the problem isn't "solved", it is just "covered up"....
    So how is this the medical profession's fault? The doc cannot force the fat patient to eat healthy and exercise. If the patient will not make the necessary lifestyle changes then the 'cause' does remain and the only avenue left is to treat the symptoms.
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    Quote Originally Posted by T-Bone View Post
    Yes rubbing someones back and telling them that its going to be ok would be a start. Its called bedside manner,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedside_manner
    Yes, we all know what bedside manner is. So in that sense, you just argued that doctors do treat people.

    Computers, Automobiles, and Toilets are somewhat different than actual people.
    Only in that they're more complex. When something is wrong, there is a cause. Everything has that in common.

    Also when I say they treat symptoms I mean exactly that. They are treating just the symptom with a drug, not the person. In other words they would not go into details of the persons lifestyle to find out what caused or is causing the symptoms.
    Physicians ask for this type of information all the time IN ADDITION to the huge medical history chart they review. And, have you ever gone to the hospital and had to fill out one of those 5 page pain-in-the-ass forms with 3 trillion questions you have to check yes or no for? Many of those are lifestyle questions.

    For instance the fat phucks that get gastric bypass surgery- even though these people eat like crap and have a poor attitude the doctor still gives them the surgery. The cut them open and staple their stomach instead of telling them to diet and exercise!.
    No, they tell them to use diet and exercise, but they cannot make them do anything. When the obesity becomes such an issue that its an enormous health risk and the patient is not helping themselves reduce that risk the physician can perform a gastric bypass to increase their longevity when the person refused to help themselves. Without the physician giving the lazy fatass a gastric bypass, that person probaly would have died 15 years earlier.

    The problem with these people is it is all in their head, its their atitude. They are still gonna eat like crap and not exercise, so the problem isn't "solved", it is just "covered up"....
    I'm not going to disagree there, with the minor exception that a person who lost massive weight as a result of a gastric bypass is in better shape than they were when they were morbidly obese (even though they would have been better off if they just hit the gym and were capable of losing it that way).

    You mention mechanics that fix the symptom...A mechanic who just replaces a part to fix a problem isn't a mechanic at all, just a "parts replacer".
    True.
    What I'm saying is you have to get to the root of the problem otherwise it still exists. If the mechanic just replaces the part and doesn't know why it failed, then its likely to just fail again and again.........
    Sometimes a mechanic has to replace a part to realize it wasn't that part that was the problem. When that part fails, he may be one step closer to solving the actual problem. This is true of all things. Its called trial and error and its a fact of life for everyone from the infant who tries to eat his feet to the physician who is trying to determine the cause of a health issue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwyckemynd00 View Post
    Lets also not forget that even though they're in the business of making people feel better they're still in business; its their livelihood and its hardly wrong to look to make enough money to make up for the 8yrs of school (minimum, probably more like 9-10 for most people) and 3-5yrs of residency + $150,000 debt they put into their career choice.
    True true.

    Much Love,

    Neoborn
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwyckemynd00 View Post
    Yes, we all know what bedside manner is. So in that sense, you just argued that doctors do treat people.

    Only in that they're more complex. When something is wrong, there is a cause. Everything has that in common.

    Physicians ask for this type of information all the time IN ADDITION to the huge medical history chart they review. And, have you ever gone to the hospital and had to fill out one of those 5 page pain-in-the-ass forms with 3 trillion questions you have to check yes or no for? Many of those are lifestyle questions.

    No, they tell them to use diet and exercise, but they cannot make them do anything. When the obesity becomes such an issue that its an enormous health risk and the patient is not helping themselves reduce that risk the physician can perform a gastric bypass to increase their longevity when the person refused to help themselves. Without the physician giving the lazy fatass a gastric bypass, that person probaly would have died 15 years earlier.

    I'm not going to disagree there, with the minor exception that a person who lost massive weight as a result of a gastric bypass is in better shape than they were when they were morbidly obese (even though they would have been better off if they just hit the gym and were capable of losing it that way).

    True.

    Sometimes a mechanic has to replace a part to realize it wasn't that part that was the problem. When that part fails, he may be one step closer to solving the actual problem. This is true of all things. Its called trial and error and its a fact of life for everyone from the infant who tries to eat his feet to the physician who is trying to determine the cause of a health issue.


    Uh...You just tired me out way too much. I can't really argue anymore about this. Hats off to you because you are much better at debate than I.
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    Good deal. I'm all argued out, too.
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