daily fat intake

Page 1 of 2 12 Last
  1. Registered User
    cmp007's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Age
    30
    Posts
    564
    Answers
    0

    daily fat intake


    How much should I intake in fat daily? Im also trying to lose a few lbs. Im about 5'10'' 185lbs ~13%BF.

  2. Registered User
    IainDaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    241
    Answers
    0


    Anywhere between 20-30% should be good.
  3. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    I'd go 60 to even 70% if you want to lose fat.
    •   
       

  4. Board Supporter
    Nitrox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    42
    Posts
    1,303
    Answers
    0


    Bodyweight management is all about balancing calorie intake with calorie expenditure. Go with a macronutrient ratio that works with your body type and lifestyle and that ensures proper nutrition.
  5. Registered User
    IainDaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    241
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    I'd go 60 to even 70% if you want to lose fat.

    60-70% of your daily calories from fat?!?!?
  6. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by IainDaniel View Post
    60-70% of your daily calories from fat?!?!?
    HELL YES.

    If you make fat your dominate macronutrient, and limit carbs to 20-30 GRAMS per day, you will BURN a wild amount of fat and in a short time. Keep protein high (1-1.5 g per lb) and eat a lot of good fats (olive oil, natural pb, fish oil (up to 40g a day), eggs, steak, hamburger, etc).

    The key is, if you put fat that high, obviously you have to CUT OUT carbs almost completely. Tough at first, but very possible.

    I'm currently doing it and I can already see fat loss in my stomach and face after just 4 days..

    It's called the Anabolic Diet.

    The cool part is, after 12 days on this low carb thing, you get to have a "carb-up" day or two (you can determine how much you need but don't go TOO wild). Then, go back to the diet for 5 days on, then 2 days carb-up. Repeat until you lose the fat you want to lose.

    Also, after the induction phase, you can cut back fat intake (even pretty drastically) and still lose fat and still be "fat adapted." You can go as "low" as 40% of intake, but most stay around 50% for optimal fat loss.

    Read up on the anabolic diet. It seems that for some who don't tolerate carbs well, that it's the best way to lose FAT weight.
  7. Board Supporter
    Nitrox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    42
    Posts
    1,303
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    HELL YES.

    If you make fat your dominate macronutrient, and limit carbs to 20-30 GRAMS per day, you will BURN a wild amount of fat and in a short time. Keep protein high (1-1.5 g per lb) and eat a lot of good fats (olive oil, natural pb, fish oil (up to 40g a day), eggs, steak, hamburger, etc).

    The key is, if you put fat that high, obviously you have to CUT OUT carbs almost completely. Tough at first, but very possible.

    I'm currently doing it and I can already see fat loss in my stomach and face after just 4 days..

    It's called the Anabolic Diet.

    The cool part is, after 12 days on this low carb thing, you get to have a "carb-up" day or two (you can determine how much you need but don't go TOO wild). Then, go back to the diet for 5 days on, then 2 days carb-up. Repeat until you lose the fat you want to lose.

    Also, after the induction phase, you can cut back fat intake (even pretty drastically) and still lose fat and still be "fat adapted." You can go as "low" as 40% of intake, but most stay around 50% for optimal fat loss.

    Read up on the anabolic diet. It seems that for some who don't tolerate carbs well, that it's the best way to lose FAT weight.
    Extreme macro nutrient ratios are not required for fat loss. I've tried it and I found that it is not what it is cracked up to be.

    The reason you burn so much fat on a high fat diet is because that is the majority of the fuel that you are providing it. Burning existing fat STORES has little to do with macro ratios and a lot to do with achieving an overall energy deficit.

    If this diet is geared towards weight loss why did the author called it 'anabolic' instead of catabolic? Sounds like another sensationalized diet. On a 70% fat diet I would be concerned about inadequate micro nutrients. Not to mention that I would also find the food selection unpleasant.

    Again to each their own. Given cmp007's original post, it appears that he is new to the nutrition game. Do you think that recommending a strict and extreme diet is really appropriate? Why not start with a more balanced 40p/40c/20f or 33/33/33 at an appropriate calorie level?
  8. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Nitrox View Post
    Extreme macro nutrient ratios are not required for fat loss. I've tried it and I found that it is not what it is cracked up to be.

    The reason you burn so much fat on a high fat diet is because that is the majority of the fuel that you are providing it. Burning existing fat STORES has little to do with macro ratios and a lot to do with achieving an overall energy deficit.

    If this diet is geared towards weight loss why did the author called it 'anabolic' instead of catabolic? Sounds like another sensationalized diet. On a 70% fat diet I would be concerned about inadequate micro nutrients. Not to mention that I would also find the food selection unpleasant.

    Again to each their own. Given cmp007's original post, it appears that he is new to the nutrition game. Do you think that recommending a strict and extreme diet is really appropriate? Why not start with a more balanced 40p/40c/20f or 33/33/33 at an appropriate calorie level?
    I don't think it's extreme at all. Read the book and then get back to me, until then, keep on believing that Carbs will get you where you want aesthetically if you wish to.

    Also, how long did you try the diet? It takes a solid 6-8 months to become totally fat-adapted. What you do is, over time reduce the fat intake to as low as 40% and then reintroduce carbs in the peri-workout time frame. It's not so bad, except for the first 2 weeks.

    Oh, and it works miraculously and almost impacts you aesthetically like some anabolic drugs might; hence the name of the diet.
  9. Registered User
    IainDaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    241
    Answers
    0


    Whatever floats your boat.

    Carbs are very important along with each Macro to a healthy diet. Sure asthetically, short term do whatever works for you. But when it comes to health I think getting a balance in nutrients from varying food sources is the most important.

    BTW losing weight isn't about what type of Macro you consume or neglect. Whether it be Protein, fats, or Carbs. The basics of it are Cals in vs. Cals out. Get adequate protein and EFA's and fill in the rest with healthy choices.
  10. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Nitrox View Post
    Extreme macro nutrient ratios are not required for fat loss. I've tried it and I found that it is not what it is cracked up to be.

    The reason you burn so much fat on a high fat diet is because that is the majority of the fuel that you are providing it. Burning existing fat STORES has little to do with macro ratios and a lot to do with achieving an overall energy deficit.

    If this diet is geared towards weight loss why did the author called it 'anabolic' instead of catabolic? Sounds like another sensationalized diet. On a 70% fat diet I would be concerned about inadequate micro nutrients. Not to mention that I would also find the food selection unpleasant.

    Again to each their own. Given cmp007's original post, it appears that he is new to the nutrition game. Do you think that recommending a strict and extreme diet is really appropriate? Why not start with a more balanced 40p/40c/20f or 33/33/33 at an appropriate calorie level?
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  11. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by IainDaniel View Post
    Whatever floats your boat.

    Carbs are very important along with each Macro to a healthy diet. Sure asthetically, short term do whatever works for you. But when it comes to health I think getting a balance in nutrients from varying food sources is the most important.

    BTW losing weight isn't about what type of Macro you consume or neglect. Whether it be Protein, fats, or Carbs. The basics of it are Cals in vs. Cals out. Get adequate protein and EFA's and fill in the rest with healthy choices.
    You are wrong: the type of Macro you consume has a lot to do with how the body works and affects fat burning in a major way. Making fat 70% of intake, with protein taking up 30% or so, causes a few things to happen:

    1) When fat is the primary fuel for a certain period of time (varies among individuals), you will become fat-adapted and burn fat for fuel rather than protein or glucose.

    2) Carbs are not anabolic and there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate and the nutrients that carbs provide can be had from good meat and a multi-vitamin, not to mention the carb-up days where you will replenish yourself (and muscle glycogen) with all that you "missed" throughout the week.

    3) It is no secret that controlling insulin is key in controlling fat gain and loss. If you cut out carbs, you cut out more major insulin spikes, which leads to less fat storage. Also, Fat is calorically dense, while protein and carbs are relatively low calorie. If you eat low fat and high protein and moderate carbs, you're not getting many calories and are in fact signaling your body to use amino acids (read: muscle) for fuel. In this situation you are "burning the walls to heat the house." If you start off a diet, it's smarter to start with higher calories so you have somewhere to DROP to when fat loss stalls.

    4) Once fat-adapted, you can gradually decrease fat intake and bring it down to 40-50% of intake, while increasing protein. Calories are cut, fat still continues to be the preferred energy source (if you had become properly fat-adapted), and you can continue to burn fat and lose fat (or gain weight I.E. Muscle Mass) depending on how much you are consuming overall.
  12. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    You are wrong: the type of Macro you consume has a lot to do with how the body works and affects fat burning in a major way. Making fat 70% of intake, with protein taking up 30% or so, causes a few things to happen:

    1) When fat is the primary fuel for a certain period of time (varies among individuals), you will become fat-adapted and burn fat for fuel rather than protein or glucose.

    2) Carbs are not anabolic and there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate and the nutrients that carbs provide can be had from good meat and a multi-vitamin, not to mention the carb-up days where you will replenish yourself (and muscle glycogen) with all that you "missed" throughout the week.

    3) It is no secret that controlling insulin is key in controlling fat gain and loss. If you cut out carbs, you cut out more major insulin spikes, which leads to less fat storage. Also, Fat is calorically dense, while protein and carbs are relatively low calorie. If you eat low fat and high protein and moderate carbs, you're not getting many calories and are in fact signaling your body to use amino acids (read: muscle) for fuel. In this situation you are "burning the walls to heat the house." If you start off a diet, it's smarter to start with higher calories so you have somewhere to DROP to when fat loss stalls.

    4) Once fat-adapted, you can gradually decrease fat intake and bring it down to 40-50% of intake, while increasing protein. Calories are cut, fat still continues to be the preferred energy source (if you had become properly fat-adapted), and you can continue to burn fat and lose fat (or gain weight I.E. Muscle Mass) depending on how much you are consuming overall.
    It's just not as efficient and should not be run for extended periods of time.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  13. Running with the Big Boys
    Board Sponsor
    Rodja's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    23,132
    Answers
    0


    Your 2nd point is one the worst points I have ever heard. Guess what your brain survives off of...glucose. Last time I checked, glucose is a carbohydrate. There is not a need for the extreme diet. Patience is the key when it comes to shedding lbs. They weren't gained in a day and they won't be lost in a day.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  14. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    Your 2nd point is one the worst points I have ever heard. Guess what your brain survives off of...glucose. Last time I checked, glucose is a carbohydrate. There is not a need for the extreme diet. Patience is the key when it comes to shedding lbs. They weren't gained in a day and they won't be lost in a day.
    The brain can function totally normally off of ketones.

    Read about the Anabolic Diet before you say something like that. A PT certificate doesn't mean you know everything about human physiology. I'm not saying I do, but I know for a fact that the brain does not need glucose to function normally or optimally.

    This would also be a good article to read: tnation.com

    Also, from Christian Thibaudeau, "A review by Hultman (1995) found that during a diet where carbs are restricted and a lot of fat is consumed, up to 70% of the energy requirement EVEN DURING HIGH INTENSITY ACTIVITIES come from the oxidation of fat (where during a high carbs diet, such activities would derive 80-90% of the energy from glycogen). So in that regard even if ketones bodies could only be used by the heart and brain, a high fat intake would still provide adequate fuel for muscle action.

    However there is evidence that ketone bodies can indeed be used as fuel by the muscle... Rasmussen and Wolfe (1999) found that "ketone bodies can be oxidized by brain and muscle when glucose is limiting".

    Other studies found that ketone bodies can account for up to 20% of energy production for muscle action.

    So on a low-carbs diet with an adequate fat intake, muscle action can be fueled by fatty acids and ketones."
  15. Running with the Big Boys
    Board Sponsor
    Rodja's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    23,132
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    The brain can function totally normally off of ketones.
    However, it is meant to survive off of glucose. There is a reaosn why it is so plentiful in nature and for insulin/glucagon.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  16. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Granted, ketones can be used for energy and the glycerol can be converted to glucose. It is still not as efficient and is taxing on the kidney.

    The problem is that your body will not sustain the activity as long and as efficiently. Do not expect too much from performance in that environment.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  17. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    Granted, ketones can be used for energy and the glycerol can be converted to glucose. It is still not as efficient and is taxing on the kidney.

    The problem is that your body will not sustain the activity as long and as efficiently. Do not expect too much from performance in that environment.
    This is why you need to understand the diet first.

    You get to gorge on carbs every 5 days, so you are never lacking it. By the time the next carb up rolls around, you're depleted but ready for more.
  18. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    However, it is meant to survive off of glucose. There is a reaosn why it is so plentiful in nature and for insulin/glucagon.
    Did you ready anything else I wrote?

    Also, who says it's MEANT to survive off of glucose? Primitive man usually lived in an environment that catered to living off of (PRIMARILY) meat.
  19. Registered User
    superdrollover's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  260 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Age
    36
    Posts
    1,091
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    This is why you need to understand the diet first.

    You get to gorge on carbs every 5 days, so you are never lacking it. By the time the next carb up rolls around, you're depleted but ready for more.
    Maybe we researched two different diets, but the one i ran did not say gorge carbs but you could eat moderate amounts
    on day 6 and 7 but once back on day one you were to try and deplete the majority of your load if not all.
  20. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Sounds like a variation of the CKD.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  21. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by superdrollover View Post
    Maybe we researched two different diets, but the one i ran did not say gorge carbs but you could eat moderate amounts
    on day 6 and 7 but once back on day one you were to try and deplete the majority of your load if not all.
    No, the anabolic/metabolic diet calls for a wild splurge on carbs. You eat carbs until you begin to "smooth out" and sort of intuitively know it's time to stop. For some guys it might be 300 grams, for others it might be 1,000 grams or more.
  22. Registered User
    superdrollover's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  260 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Age
    36
    Posts
    1,091
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    No, the anabolic/metabolic diet calls for a wild splurge on carbs. You eat carbs until you begin to "smooth out" and sort of intuitively know it's time to stop. For some guys it might be 300 grams, for others it might be 1,000 grams or more.
    My bad!
  23. Registered User
    superdrollover's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  260 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Age
    36
    Posts
    1,091
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    Sounds like a variation of the CKD.
    Thats it!

    I never researched the anabolic diet I just thought it was more of an increase in protein to fat ratio then the CKD
  24. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    If anyone wants the E-Books on the Anabolic Diet, shoot me a PM with your email address.

    It's good info, if not completely mind boggling at first. I admit that it is a radical departure from a modern diet, but it might also be "what the doctor ordered" for particular individuals who have insulin/carb issues.
  25. Registered User
    cmp007's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Age
    30
    Posts
    564
    Answers
    0


    It seems to me if your trying to lose a few lbs and keep it off why go so far out of your way to change your entire diet to nothing but fats. Then make your body used to the fats then cut them out. That seems to be stupid if you ask me. I just wanted to know about how much grams of fat is recommended for a daily intake. Dont think I want to go off and eat 1500 calories in fat a day to make my body feed of nothing but fats... sounds stupid.
  26. Registered User
    superdrollover's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  260 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Age
    36
    Posts
    1,091
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by IainDaniel View Post
    Anywhere between 20-30% should be good.
  27. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by cmp007 View Post
    How much should I intake in fat daily?
    20-40% of total calories.
    Quote Originally Posted by cmp007 View Post
    Im also trying to lose a few lbs. Im about 5'10'' 185lbs ~13%BF.
    500kcal/day below maintenance to start, adjust as needed.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  28. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by cmp007 View Post
    It seems to me if your trying to lose a few lbs and keep it off why go so far out of your way to change your entire diet to nothing but fats. Then make your body used to the fats then cut them out. That seems to be stupid if you ask me. I just wanted to know about how much grams of fat is recommended for a daily intake. Dont think I want to go off and eat 1500 calories in fat a day to make my body feed of nothing but fats... sounds stupid.
    The largest thread of all-time at T-Nation is one about the Anabolic Diet, with it mostly being about the member's success on the diet.

    And actually, you sound stupid just dismissing something that you know nothing about. I shouldn't even waste my time with you if you're going to act this closed-minded. Realize that there are other perspectives on the issue, and MANY people have had amazing success (especially formerly very fat people) on the anabolic diet.
  29. Registered User
    IainDaniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    241
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    The largest thread of all-time at T-Nation is one about the Anabolic Diet, with it mostly being about the member's success on the diet.

    And actually, you sound stupid just dismissing something that you know nothing about. I shouldn't even waste my time with you if you're going to act this closed-minded. Realize that there are other perspectives on the issue, and MANY people have had amazing success (especially formerly very fat people) on the anabolic diet.

    Sounds like the pot calling the kettle black.

    You do realize ketones are toxic to the body, right?
  30. Board Supporter
    Nitrox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    42
    Posts
    1,303
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    The largest thread of all-time at T-Nation is one about the Anabolic Diet, with it mostly being about the member's success on the diet.
    Hmm... T-nation. It all becomes clear. You do realize that T-nation is a commercial site and the forum is not only moderated but edited and censored before posts go live? Wanna buy a swamp?

    And yes the brain NEEDS glucose (see Hypoglycemia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) but does not need dietary carbohydrate to get it. It can be obtained from the glycerol component of fat, or from protein breakdown (dietary or lean body tissue).

    Carbs ARE anabolic. All food with a positive calorie value has the ability to be anabolic or anti-catabolic.

    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    And actually, you sound stupid just dismissing something that you know nothing about. I shouldn't even waste my time with you if you're going to act this closed-minded. Realize that there are other perspectives on the issue, and MANY people have had amazing success (especially formerly very fat people) on the anabolic diet.
    Actually this is all old hat here at AM. Most of the vets here have honed their views on objective studies and discussions not the preachings of a private commercial site or diet book. Calling people stupid is not a great way to be taken seriously.
    Last edited by Nitrox; 08-11-2007 at 01:18 AM. Reason: Insert quote
  31. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by IainDaniel View Post
    Sounds like the pot calling the kettle black.

    You do realize ketones are toxic to the body, right?
    The Anabolic Diet is not a keto-diet. You get carbs in excess, but they are restricted some of the time. It's similar to carb cycling.

    And the comment about T-Nation? I've never had a post edited there after 600+ posts. The Anabolic Diet is a discussion about the anabolic diet, and has nothing to do with t-nation other than the fact that the URL of the thread contains the word 't-nation.'
  32. Running with the Big Boys
    Board Sponsor
    Rodja's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    23,132
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    The Anabolic Diet is not a keto-diet. You get carbs in excess, but they are restricted some of the time. It's similar to carb cycling.

    And the comment about T-Nation? I've never had a post edited there after 600+ posts. The Anabolic Diet is a discussion about the anabolic diet, and has nothing to do with t-nation other than the fact that the URL of the thread contains the word 't-nation.'
    It is not a keto diet??? The main goal of carb-cycling diets is to go into ketosis. In case you were not aware, CKD is an anagram for Cyclic Ketogenic Diet. The "Anabolic Diet" is a different version of a CKD plan.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  33. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    It is not a keto diet??? The main goal of carb-cycling diets is to go into ketosis. In case you were not aware, CKD is an anagram for Cyclic Ketogenic Diet. The "Anabolic Diet" is a different version of a CKD plan.
    The Anabolic Diet is not a keto-diet, necessarily. For some it might be. A lot of times, the carb-up is so significant that you won't go into ketosis, except for possibly a day or two out of the week.
  34. Running with the Big Boys
    Board Sponsor
    Rodja's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    23,132
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    The Anabolic Diet is not a keto-diet, necessarily. For some it might be. A lot of times, the carb-up is so significant that you won't go into ketosis, except for possibly a day or two out of the week.
    I can guarantee that if you cut carbs as low as you recommend, then your body will go into ketosis within 36 hours or so.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  35. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    A lot of times, the carb-up is so significant that you won't go into ketosis, except for possibly a day or two out of the week.
    Then it defeats its purpose.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  36. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    Then it defeats its purpose.
    Not quite. By getting the carbs at one time, you replenish glycogen levels and then deplete them each week. The key is that you are eating basically all of the carbs for the week at one time, and then you're using them all up throughout the week, while still maintaining the fat-adapted state (which is usually only FULLY reached after 6 months - sometimes more). You wouldn't maintain a fat-adapted state if you ate carbs every day.

    It's a lifestyle change, not just some quick cutting or bulking diet (you can do either with this method of eating).
  37. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    I can guarantee that if you cut carbs as low as you recommend, then your body will go into ketosis within 36 hours or so.
    Again, with the carb-up, that's not necessarily true. You should also read about the Warrior Diet (which is insane to me, but interesting), which goes into a whole huge thing about how unbelievably large our glycogen stores are in comparison to what we believe they are (it goes into some talk about how there are 20,000 calories or more worth of glucose stores - If I'm remembering correctly).
  38. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Simple fact, this fat adapted state that you are referring to is ketosis.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  39. Registered User
    dhuge67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Age
    28
    Posts
    796
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    Simple fact, this fat adapted state that you are referring to is ketosis.
    I agree that it can be.

    Some people are not able to reach Ketosis on even 10 grams of carbs a day. It's not as simple for everyone to enter into the state of ketosis as you think.
  40. Registered User
    jonny21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,254
    Answers
    0


    Quote Originally Posted by dhuge67 View Post
    I agree that it can be.

    Some people are not able to reach Ketosis on even 10 grams of carbs a day. It's not as simple for everyone to enter into the state of ketosis as you think.
    I think you are missing the point. Ketones are a by-product of lipid metabolism. So, if fatty acids are being used as energy ketones are produced and you are in ketosis. BTW, ketones are what your brain uses for energy in absence of glucose.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-26-2007, 05:38 AM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-21-2007, 07:44 PM
  3. Fat intake: 40-40-20 question
    By marshmallow man in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-03-2005, 01:01 PM
  4. fat intake?
    By dsmlinc in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-12-2005, 02:13 AM
  5. Is Fat intake Required for Ketosis?
    By maple626 in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-21-2005, 08:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in