Too Much Sugar in Milk?

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    Too Much Sugar in Milk?


    My diet allows 250 gms of carbs. In looking over my intake I see that if I have two 16 oz portions of milk with my protein shakes that gives me just under 50 gms of sugar from the milk.

    That means that 20% of my carbs are coming from sugars through the milk alone. Isn't that a lot of sugar? Wouldn't I be better off if I could replace that 50 gms with yams or barley or oatmeal?

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    I've tried looking and researching in vain for all answers for Skim Milk.

    Anyone is welcome to correct me, but from what I gather lactose is a low GI carb. Milk has a high(or higher than it appears it should) insulin response due to its protein, specifically Leucine, the other two BCAA's and Lysine.

    As far as lactose, technically any carb is sugar (right? the family of C-H-O's...they are all variations of the same chain?) and the "ose" ending should't always be a "trouble sign". Even a fiber like "cellulose", well, ends in "ose". Also not all of lactose is broken down into glucose as some is broken down to galactose (sp?) which doesn't stimulate an insulin response.

    Anyway, I have no idea how all that plays out in your body and I have no idea if I helped or confused you. But from everything I've been able to piece to together the lactose isn't a problem. I would assume 50g of carbs you are getting wouldn't be a problem since you are getting other health benifits like protein from the milk. It might be wiser to have 4 8oz servings than 2 16oz ones.
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    You are correct. You may be somewhat better off in selecting a carb source that has a lower GI index but I would say that personal preference is also going to play a roll here. If you are seeing negative effects from this much milk intake, ie. you feel its not ideal for you diet, then change it up. Personally, I love milk in the morning and post-wo and at night (not ideal). I just flat out love milk.
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    ive read that milk sugar only replenishes liver glycogen but ive heard it refills liver and muscle glycogen stores. does anyone have more info on this?
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    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBeHulk
    ive read that milk sugar only replenishes liver glycogen but ive heard it refills liver and muscle glycogen stores. does anyone have more info on this?
    That first part would be false my friend. Lactose is broken down to glucose and galactose. Galactose is then further metabolized to gluc6phos...

    Fructose is primarily used in the liver.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonny21
    That first part would be false my friend. Lactose is broken down to glucose and galactose. Galactose is then further metabolized to gluc6phos...

    Fructose is primarily used in the liver.
    thanks for the help, ive been wondering this a long time.
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    what about the carbs from low fat cottage cheese before bed. do you think that will cause a big enough insulin response for me to not eat right before going to sleep?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mildain
    what about the carbs from low fat cottage cheese before bed. do you think that will cause a big enough insulin response for me to not eat right before going to sleep?
    Isn't there only 3-4 grams of sugar per serving?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mildain
    what about the carbs from low fat cottage cheese before bed. do you think that will cause a big enough insulin response for me to not eat right before going to sleep?
    No, it will not cause an insulin spike, especially the low fat vs. non fat as the fat will slow digestion some. CC has a very low GI and it is an excellent protein source that can be taken before bed. The reason for this is the casein protein that will provide a slow and steady release of amino acids into your bloodstream while you sleep. This will prevent your body going into a catabolic or muscle wasting state.
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    How about for my milk (lactose free) and expensive as hell ($7+ gallon). Since they already added in the lactase enzyme my 12 grams sugar per 8 oz. should include glucose and galactose right? Therfore shouldn't mine have a slightly higher GI than regular milk? Granted the amount of glucose is probably to small to cause an insulin spike, unless i drank a whole gallon of it or something, but I'm still curious.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schwaugher
    How about for my milk (lactose free) and expensive as hell ($7+ gallon). Since they already added in the lactase enzyme my 12 grams sugar per 8 oz. should include glucose and galactose right? Therfore shouldn't mine have a slightly higher GI than regular milk? Granted the amount of glucose is probably to small to cause an insulin spike, unless i drank a whole gallon of it or something, but I'm still curious.
    In theory, it should be slightly higher GI, but the amount of sugar in milk combined with the fat and protein content is not enough to spike insulin to any appreciable degree. The GI of milk is trivial IMO, as it will have very little impact on blood glucose levels.
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    Quote Originally Posted by psulifter
    In theory, it should be slightly higher GI, but the amount of sugar in milk combined with the fat and protein content is not enough to spike insulin to any appreciable degree. The GI of milk is trivial IMO, as it will have very little impact on blood glucose levels.
    That's not true. Milk does have a significant insulin response. It's unique protein profile causes a rise an insulin that is not suspected because of its GI.

    Carbs are not the only thing that causes an insulin response....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrw
    That's not true. Milk does have a significant insulin response. It's unique protein profile causes a rise an insulin that is not suspected because of its GI.
    I'm intrigued...can you post a link/article to clarify/expand on this topic. That is if you have one on hand or know where to find it fast. If not that's fine, I will look for some information tomorrow, but I'm too tired to do it right now.
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    like deebo said make a choice- in other words what would you like your carbs to be within your set limit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schwaugher
    I'm intrigued...can you post a link/article to clarify/expand on this topic. That is if you have one on hand or know where to find it fast. If not that's fine, I will look for some information tomorrow, but I'm too tired to do it right now.
    Different Proteins May Have Varying Insulinotropic Properties CME
    News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD
    CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd







    Nov. 17, 2004 — Different proteins have varying insulinotropic properties, and the whey fraction of milk is the predominant insulin secretagogue, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
    "Milk products deviate from other carbohydrate-containing foods in that they produce high insulin responses, despite their low glycemic index (GI)," write Mikael Nilsson, MD, from Lund University in Sweden, and colleagues. "The insulinotropic mechanism of milk has not been elucidated."
    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of common dietary sources of animal or vegetable proteins on concentrations of postprandial blood glucose, insulin, amino acids, and incretin hormones, including glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1, in 12 healthy volunteers. These subjects ate test meals consisting of reconstituted milk, cheese, whey, cod, and wheat gluten with equivalent amounts of lactose, with an equicarbohydrate load of white-wheat bread used as a reference meal.
    Postprandial insulin responses were correlated with early increments in plasma amino acids, with the strongest correlations for leucine, valine, lysine, and isoleucine. There was also a correlation between responses of insulin and GIP concentrations.
    Compared with the bread reference, reconstituted milk powder and whey had substantially lower postprandial glucose areas under the curve (AUCs) (-62% and -57%, respectively). The whey meal was associated with higher AUCs for insulin (90%) and GIP (54%).
    "Food proteins differ in their capacity to stimulate insulin release, possibly by differently affecting the early release of incretin hormones and insulinotropic amino acids," the authors write. "Milk proteins have insulinotropic properties; the whey fraction contains the predominating insulin secretagogue.... The potential long-term effects of a noncarbohydrate-mediated insulin stimulus on metabolic variables should be evaluated in healthy persons and in persons with a diminished capacity for insulin secretion."
    The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, and Direktör Albert Påhlssons stiftelse för forskning och va¨lgörenhet supported this study. None of the authors report a conflict of interest.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80:1246-1253
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    try hood's carb countdown...milk with only 3g carbs per 8oz...same protein, almost the same taste. for me, perfect for shakes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bleedinblue823
    try hood's carb countdown...milk with only 3g carbs per 8oz...same protein, almost the same taste. for me, perfect for shakes.
    I use this while cutting. It's good stuff.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrw
    Different Proteins May Have Varying Insulinotropic Properties CME
    News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD
    CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd







    Nov. 17, 2004 — Different proteins have varying insulinotropic properties, and the whey fraction of milk is the predominant insulin secretagogue, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
    "Milk products deviate from other carbohydrate-containing foods in that they produce high insulin responses, despite their low glycemic index (GI)," write Mikael Nilsson, MD, from Lund University in Sweden, and colleagues. "The insulinotropic mechanism of milk has not been elucidated."
    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of common dietary sources of animal or vegetable proteins on concentrations of postprandial blood glucose, insulin, amino acids, and incretin hormones, including glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1, in 12 healthy volunteers. These subjects ate test meals consisting of reconstituted milk, cheese, whey, cod, and wheat gluten with equivalent amounts of lactose, with an equicarbohydrate load of white-wheat bread used as a reference meal.
    Postprandial insulin responses were correlated with early increments in plasma amino acids, with the strongest correlations for leucine, valine, lysine, and isoleucine. There was also a correlation between responses of insulin and GIP concentrations.
    Compared with the bread reference, reconstituted milk powder and whey had substantially lower postprandial glucose areas under the curve (AUCs) (-62% and -57%, respectively). The whey meal was associated with higher AUCs for insulin (90%) and GIP (54%).
    "Food proteins differ in their capacity to stimulate insulin release, possibly by differently affecting the early release of incretin hormones and insulinotropic amino acids," the authors write. "Milk proteins have insulinotropic properties; the whey fraction contains the predominating insulin secretagogue.... The potential long-term effects of a noncarbohydrate-mediated insulin stimulus on metabolic variables should be evaluated in healthy persons and in persons with a diminished capacity for insulin secretion."
    The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, and Direktör Albert Påhlssons stiftelse för forskning och va¨lgörenhet supported this study. None of the authors report a conflict of interest.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80:1246-1253

    This study just states that milk has a more pronounced release, hence a higher glycemic load due to its protein content. There is a difference between the GI and the GL of a food item. Considering everything milk still is a low to mod GI AND GL carb source.

    I've cut people down all the time to single digits using skim milk. People worrying about milk when cutting are really splitting hairs.

    Only when you are approaching contest level should you worry about lactose intake but then again other factors play a role as well such as sodium/potassium levels.



    Swedish milk is also much lower than its American counterpart so the figures will be infalted as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by psulifter
    In theory, it should be slightly higher GI, but the amount of sugar in milk combined with the fat and protein content is not enough to spike insulin to any appreciable degree. The GI of milk is trivial IMO, as it will have very little impact on blood glucose levels.
    The problem with this view is that you are not factoring in quantity. The glycemic index is a relative scale hence the GI value cannot reasonably separated from the effective GL determined by the serving size when discussing effects on blood glucose.

    FWIW a 160z serving of skim milk with 25g carbs and ~200kcals will approx double my blood glucose level from a 'textbook' baseline.

    Like the others said - fit it in to your carb allowance and it should be fine.
  

  
 

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