Supplements for acne?

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    Supplements for acne?


    I have a little acne but enough for it to bother me on the back of my neck, shoulders, and back. This used to really not be a problem because my old gym had a sauna but now i have no sauna and its comin back. I have a great diet veggies, fruits, rice, oats, fish, chicken, protein, nuts, vitamins and i drink at least a gallon of water a day. I have tried many things that are available at k-mart, rite aid, etc.. but none of it seems to really work. Does anyone have experience or know of any oral supplements i can take that will help or even maybe body washes that work well? Thanks!

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    If you have health insurance, see a doctor. I got something called Minocycline and I haven't seen very many breakouts around my back, shoulders, and around my neck/chin where I shave like I used to. Cost me only $10 for 2 months supply. It's a pill you take, only issue is something to do with your skin gets fairly sensitive to burning if you stay out too long in the sun. Also a few other possible minor side effects..nothing major though. I used to have Proactive, didn't work well enough. I just use the Minocycline prescription and some "Oxy" acne soap bar that costs $3.
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    You could look into the banish soap made by RPN. In the past i have used doctor prescribed creams to use on my face(i forget the exact compounds) but my acne isn't bad enough to warrant a need for a prescription anymore.
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    I have severe trouble with acne, the only thing that helped me was acutane, I had acne everywhere face, shoulders, and chest mostly. I would suggest though for you to first go see a dermatologist if it bothers you that much and if not try some of that pro active stuff, I've heard it works for light cases of acne.
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    Ya i have heard of acutane but mine isn't that bad and the side effects of that stuff can be bad :S had a few friends that took it. But some of the other stuff i might try, i was checking out the banish by RPN but i didn't see any reviews really but i sitll might give it a shot and maybe see a dermatologist to see if there is a light perscription i can take. Thanks for the ideas guys.
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    as far as oral supplements besides alot of water, I have heard of Zinc being helpful in repairing skin and acne as well as antioxidant and cleansing supplements
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    you might also want to look into Poseiden by Nimbus Nutrition. I took it and had a significant clear up of acne
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    Accutane is working for me currently. Taking ultra low dose of 10mg per day. After only one month, I'm pretty much completely clear and healing. Its really the closest thing to a permanent cure out there. Might look into something like Benzaclin from dermatogist which is a topical anti-biotic/Benzolperoxide cream accompanied by an oral anti-biotic, but I have never had much luck with these for my back/neck. Accutane is changing my life.
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    Ya, i have heard a lot of people that have had success with it i just don't have the extra money to spend on it right now. I got insurance but still it costs a bit of money.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Afrochowder View Post
    Ya, i have heard a lot of people that have had success with it i just don't have the extra money to spend on it right now. I got insurance but still it costs a bit of money.
    $5 per month for me..... Not sure how good or bad your insurance is, but it may not cost what you think it will
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    Zinc, magnesium, and b5. I haven't had bad acne in a couple years, but when I get an occasional zit I make sure not to miss taking supplements, and also make sure that my stress levels are under control, because I break out whenever there are 'complicated' issues.
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    Hmmm maybe i will look into acutane, you have to get blood work done dont you?
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    Acutane is really strong. It can have serious side effects. If you drink or use drugs while on Acutane you can literally go insane or suicidal. For your situation it isn't necessary. It should be used in those last resort situations where nothing seems to work and the acne is very serious and scaring. You seem to have the same acne problem I used to have. My doctor prescribed Minocyline. It costs me $10 for over 200 pills. My acne has cleared up around my shoulders, back, and around my neck where I shave. Little to no side effects. Definitely safer than trying to use Acutane when you don't need it.
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    Ya your right cause its really not that bad it really just bugs me and i guess ill see a dermatologist soon, ask em about some stuff and maybe minocycline. Also with minocycline do you know if taking supplements like test boosters and preworkout stuff is okay?
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    Neither should be an issue. I use a pws almost every workout. good luck
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    Quote Originally Posted by harleyman89 View Post
    Acutane is really strong. It can have serious side effects. If you drink or use drugs while on Acutane you can literally go insane or suicidal. For your situation it isn't necessary. It should be used in those last resort situations where nothing seems to work and the acne is very serious and scaring. You seem to have the same acne problem I used to have. My doctor prescribed Minocyline. It costs me $10 for over 200 pills. My acne has cleared up around my shoulders, back, and around my neck where I shave. Little to no side effects. Definitely safer than trying to use Acutane when you don't need it.
    What side effects do you refer to? When it was first being prescribed and they did not know much about it, doctors were prescribing doses super high. If you read recent medical journals, you would know that the same effects can be accomplished by ultra low doses. The only side effect to note that I have at 10mg is slight chapped lips. Long term antibiotic use is not healthy in itself. It cracks me up with uninformed people like yourself who read these obsurd things about accutane and take them as the holy bible. What's going to happen when you stop taking your antibiotics? Your acne will come back, there is no end in sight. With accutane the hope is that once you are done with your course you will never have acne again. To each is there own, but learn a bit about what your preaching. Accutane has done a ton more good than bad. My bloodwork actually came back better since i've been on accutane. READ READ READ before you try to ADVISE
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    It should also be noted that there have been more deaths related to minocycline than accutane. It can also cause gums and nails to turn blue. As well as:

    *

    severe headache, dizziness, blurred vision;
    *

    fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;
    *

    severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;
    *

    urinating less than usual or not at all;
    *

    pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness;
    *

    severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;
    *

    loss of appetite, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
    *

    easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness.

    Less serious side effects may include:

    *

    sores or swelling in your rectal or genital area;
    *

    mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach upset;
    *

    white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
    *

    swollen tongue, trouble swallowing; or
    *

    vaginal itching or discharge.
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    Since Harleyman negged me for not posting any studies here are some:

    Low Dose, High Rates of Success

    Ultra-low dose isotretinoin is all many acne patients need

    San Francisco - Low and ultra-low doses of isotretinoin are an effective therapy for many acne patients. This safer and cheaper solution can even be used continuously.

    Gerd Plewig, M.D., believes that the doses of isotretinoin typically used in the United States and Europe are far too high. For many patients, as little as 2.5 mg twice a week, which he describes as "a drop of rain on a dusty road" is adequate.

    Dermatologists all over the world already are treating some patients continuously with low doses of isotretinoin, according to Dr. Plewig, director, dermatology and allergy clinic, Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich.

    "When you talk to doctors in this country and other countries of the world, they use 10 mg twice a week or three times a week, which is a low or ultra-low dose. But nobody ever bothered to show and demonstrate that it works," he said. Thus, he and his team performed two clinical trials to assess its efficacy.

    Study Spotlights Low Dosing In the first trial, 28 patients with acne conglobata and inflammatory acne took a low dose of isotretinoin: 20 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, or 0.5 mg/kg body weight daily for six months. In the second study, 11 acne patients took an ultra low dose of isotretinoin: 2.5 mg to 5 mg daily or 2.5 mg twice a week for six months. Both trials involved multiple endpoints, including clinical grading, lesion counts, counts of follicular filaments (believed to be precursors to lesions), bacterial colonization, patients' opinion of seborrhea levels, two objective measurements of sebum levels (Sebutape and Bentonite clay), qualitative assessment of sebum using high power, thin layer chromatography, and biopsies to assess size and configuration of sebaceous glands.

    Trials Yield Significant Improvement Results of the first trial in which low doses of isotretinoin were used revealed significant improvements in all parameters tested. Numbers of follicular filaments, and lesions dropped, as did levels of bacteria and sebum. Sebaceous glands shrank, as well.

    At the end of the second study, which investigated ultra-low doses of isotretinoin, efficacy was maintained on many of the parameters. There were significant reductions in numbers of active lesions and follicular filaments as well as objective measures of sebum levels. Patients' ratings of seborrhea improved, and levels of P. acnes on the skin diminished.

    "The endpoint or the lowest point of a retinoid being effective for the treatment of seborrhea, persistent low grade acne, or maintenance therapy for patients with bad acne probably is around 2.5 mg or 2 mg, or maybe even 1.5 mg," Dr. Plewig said.

    The best candidates for low and ultra-low doses isotretinoin therapy, Dr. Plewig said, include patients with severe acne who were controlled with higher doses and require a lower-dose maintenance therapy, individuals whose facial acne has persisted from adolescence into adulthood, and people with sebaceous gland hyperplasia. "Some patients come only because of their oiliness. ... For these patients, I think the low or ultra-low dose is very good, and it's cheap, too," he said.

    Severe Patients Still Receive Low Doses Dr. Plewig keeps doses of isotretinoin relatively low in patients with severe acne. "I pretreat patients with severe inflammatory acne with systemic corticosteroids to begin with...about 1 mg/kg body weight for about seven to 14 days, taper it off, and then give an antibiotic, usually an erythromycin, a macrolide," he said. "And then I start with the isotretinoin [0.2 mg/kg to 0.4 mg/kg body weight]. It is so much better. We used to start immediately with isotretinoin or tried antibiotics, but often it takes too long, the patients are miserable, and it is so much better for them because you can have a faster final result, a better final result with cooling down the skin first, then adding your active treatment."

    Continuous Use Offers Versatility A great benefit of using lower doses of isotretinoin is that it can be used continuously. There are other important advantages, as well. "In terms of pharmacoeconomics, it is cheaper to use lower doses, it is better tolerated by patients, has fewer side effects, fewer laboratory abnormalities, and of course the patients like it when they have continuous elegant treatment," Dr. Plewig said.

    Despite the safer side-effect profile with low-dose isotretinoin, Dr. Plewig emphasized that, at any dose, the drug should still be considered teratogenic and be used with great caution in women of childbearing age.

    http://www.dermatologytimes.com/derm...l.jsp?id=65528

    ******
    Changing dosing patterns Dosing patterns have become quite varied among dermatologists. While most still use the label guidance of 1 mg per kilogram per day for about five months, there is a growing acceptance of lower dosing regimens.

    "The Europeans always used lower doses," says Dr. Plewig. "Even the 1 mg is too high. The usual dose (in Europe) is 0.5 or less; sometimes we use 0.2 mg. Although we sometimes treat for a longer period."

    "I'm a strong believer that low -dose Accutane is the way to go," says Craig G. Burkhart, M.D., a clinical professor of dermatology at the Medical College of Ohio. "We use between 10 and 20 mg per day and that's all we use. I don't care if the guy is 350 pounds, the most he'll get is 20 mg a day."
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    Low-Dose Accutane Good for Mild Acne
    HEALTH NEWS BITE
    Monday, May 15, 2006

    People suffering from mild cases of acne can benefit significantly from small doses of Accutane and other tretinoin-based acne treatments, a new study finds. Conducted by researchers at Israel's Soroka University, the study found that low-dose Accutane was also an effective means of reducing the side effects of inflammation and dryness that have been associated with Accutane in past research. For the purposes of the study, "low-dose" was defined as 20 milligrams of Accutane daily over the course of six months. At that dosage, researchers found that a remarkable 95% of patients experienced either complete remission of their acne or significant improvement at minimum.
    http://www.lifescript.com/channels/B..._mild_acne.asp



    ********
    Oral isotretinoin as part of the treatment of cutaneous aging.

    Hernandez-Perez E, Khawaja HA, Alvarez TY.

    Center for Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery, San Salvador, El Salvador. enrimar@ejje.com

    BACKGROUND: A number of drugs have been used to prevent aging changes. However, studies of oral isotretinoin, the commonly used acne drug, as an antiaging drug are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To determine improvement in cutaneous aging utilizing oral isotretinoin combined with different procedures of facial rejuvenation. METHODS: Sixty patients ranging in age from 35 to 65 years, in whom additional modalities of rejuvenation were also used, were randomly assigned to receive treatment with oral isotretinoin (10-20 mg three times a week for 2 months, group A). Their results were compared with 60 patients who had undergone the same surgical procedures but with no oral isotretinoin (group . RESULTS: All patients treated with oral isotretinoin noted improvement in wrinkles, thickness and color of the skin, size of pores, skin elasticity, tone, and reduction in pigmented lesions and mottled hyperpigmentation. A statistically significant difference was found in the improvement of group A (Wilcoxon test <0.01). Using minimal amounts of this drug, the side effects were practically negligible. CONCLUSION: Utilizing various procedures with oral isotretinoin allowed us to improve the effects of cutaneous aging. Our results using isotretinoin in these cases have been satisfactory. We believe that this is one of the first reports of the use of oral isotretinoin in intrinsic and photoaged skin.

    Publication Types:



    Low-dose isotretinoin in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Amichai B, Shemer A, Grunwald MH.

    Huzot Clinic of Clalit Health Services, Ashkelon, Israel.

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of isotretinoin at 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg per day in the treatment of acne is well established and considered safe, although it is sometimes not easily tolerated because of its cutaneous side effects. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of low-dose isotretinoin in the treatment of acne. METHODS: In this prospective, noncomparative, open-label study, 638 patients, both male and female, with moderate acne were enrolled and treated with isotretinoin at 20 mg/d (approximately 0.3-0.4 mg/kg per day) for 6 months. The patients were divided into two age groups: 12 to 20 and 21 to 35 years old. Patients were evaluated at 2-month intervals by means of clinical and laboratory examinations. A 4-year follow-up was also carried out. RESULTS: At the end of the treatment phase, good results were observed in 94.8% of the patients aged 12 to 20 years, and in 92.6% of the patients aged 21 to 35 years. Failure of the treatment occurred in 5.2% and 7.4% of the two groups, respectively. Twenty-one patients dropped out of the study because of lack of compliance, and another patient discontinued participation because of a laboratory side effect. During the 4-year follow-up period, relapses of the acne occurred in 3.9% of the patients aged 12 to 20 years and in 5.9% of the patients aged 21 to 35 years. Elevated serum lipid levels (up to 20% higher than the upper limit of normal value) were found in 4.2% of the patients and abnormal (<twice the upper limit of normal values) liver tests were observed in 4.8%. LIMITATIONS: This was a noncomparative, open-label study. CONCLUSION: Six months of treatment with low-dose isotretinoin (20 mg/d) was found to be effective in the treatment of moderate acne, with a low incidence of severe side effects and at a lower cost than higher doses.

    PMID: 16546586 [PubMed - in process]


    Very low dose isotretinoin is effective in controlling seborrhea.

    Geissler SE, Michelsen S, Plewig G.

    Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich.

    BACKGROUND: Excessive seborrhea, coarse-pored skin, minimal acne and oily scalp hair comprise a well-known clinical entity. It causes considerable concern, has social impact, and affects the quality of life in some individuals. Some patients seek treatment for seborrhea. No effective topical sebosuppressive medication is available. Oral isotretinoin is the only remedy for men. In women, oral isotretinoin is the most effective remedy, followed by antiandrogens. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients in three groups were treated for 6 months with very low dose isotretinoin. The influence on seborrhea was measured during oral treatment with 5 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, or 2.5 mg 3x weekly. RESULTS: Sebum production, measured with Sebutape, was reduced by up to 64%. Acne lesions regressed by as much as 84%. Follicular filaments were reduced by 66%. Microcomedones were reduced on average up to 86%. Quantitative bacteriology showed a reduction of Propionibacterium acnes but no increase of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biopsies revealed a 51% reduction in sebaceous gland size. With Bentonite, a reduction of lipids was demonstrated with 2.5 and 5 mg isotretinoin/d but not with 2.5 mg 3x weekly. There was a shift within the lipid fractions: triglycerides dominated, followed by squalenes and free fatty acids. CONCLUSIONS: Good results were achieved in all patients. The small number of patients did not permit a statistical analysis of the three isotretinoin doses studied, but there was a tendency toward better results with the two higher doses.

    PMID: 16285647 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



    Low dose isotretinoin combined with tretinoin is effective to correct abnormalities of acne.

    Plewig G, Dressel H, Pfleger M, Michelsen S, Kligman AM.

    Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich, Germany. Gerd.Plewig@derma.med.uni-muenchen.de

    BACKGROUND: Isotretinoin is well known in the therapy of acne papulopustulosa and acne conglobata. No study has investigated the pathophysiological changes of the skin of acne patients, especially when low dose oral isotretinoin is given in combination with topical tretinoin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 28 patients were treated for 6 months with oral isotretinoin. In the acne conglobata group (A-C) patients were treated with 10 mg (Group A) or 20 mg isotretinoin (Groups B, C) in combination with topical 0.05% tretinoin cream. Group C was treated the first 2 weeks with 0.05% betamethasone valerate cream instead of tretinoin cream. In the acne papulopustulosa group, the patients received 0.5 mg isotretinoin/kg bodyweight and 0.05% tretinoin cream, either alone (Group E), or with oral methylprednisolone during induction (Group D). RESULTS: Acne conglobata--A reduction of inflammatory lesion by 87-94% and of non-inflammatory lesions by 81-88% was achieved (Groups A-C). A reduction of sebaceous gland size by 35-58%, sebum production by 90-95%, follicular keratinization by 55-70% and Propionibacteria by 33-73% was seen (Groups B and C better than Group A). In Group A the amount of lipids was only reduced by 6%, in Group B by 35% and in Group C by 40%. Acne papulopustulosa--Sebum excretion rate and follicular keratinization were reduced in Group D by 89% and 50% respectively, with isotretinoin alone by 94% and 53%. The amount of lipids was reduced in Group D by 40% and in Group E by 21%. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the efficacy and cost-benefit relationship of isotretinoin in the treatment of acne compared to other therapeutic approaches, further use low dose isotretinoin in the described settings seems to justified.
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    Hey, there's a reasons you got negged. You negged me first calling me out saying to learn before I preach, when you posted absolutely no factual evidence to prove what you said. Heres my response I tried posting earlier(without links because i dont have enough posts)

    I actually read these "obsurd things about accutane" off the fda website. Clearly stated(from October 2007),
    "WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT
    ACCUTANE?
    Accutane is used to treat a type of severe acne (nodular acne) that has not been helped by other treatments, including antibiotics.
    Because Accutane can cause birth defects, Accutane is only for patients who can
    understand and agree to carry out all of the instructions in the iPLEDGE program.
    Accutane may cause serious mental health problems."

    Please provide us with factual evidence that proves the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has posted false information. Also, please post your source for death rates related to minocyline and accutane. Oh, and what was the point of the negative rep,
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    Some info on antibiotics(tetracyclines):
    - An accumulation of tetracyclines in the body may cause one’s skin to develop a purplish tint. They look like bruises, and can take up to a year to fade away. Routine doctor visits and Vitamin C 500mg twice daily can reduce this risk.
    - The longer you are on an antibiotic, the less effective it becomes. This is because the acne-causing bacteria becomes immune to the antibiotic by mutating into “super bacteria,? making your acne worse and possibly untreatable. Further, if you get another kind of infection while on a tetracycline (for example, pneumonia), antibiotics may not be an effective treatment option. This is a serious cause for concern. Antibiotics can also cause Candida, a condition where white patches form on one’s tongue. This is because the acne antibiotic also kills beneficial bacteria found on the tongue that fights off a naturally-occurring yeast infection. Other side effects still exist, but tetracycline users should always work with their doctors to find alternatives to antibiotic use.
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    Quote Originally Posted by harleyman89 View Post
    Hey, there's a reasons you got negged. You negged me first calling me out saying to learn before I preach, when you posted absolutely no factual evidence to prove what you said. Heres my response I tried posting earlier(without links because i dont have enough posts)

    I actually read these "obsurd things about accutane" off the fda website. Clearly stated(from October 2007),
    "WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT
    ACCUTANE?
    Accutane is used to treat a type of severe acne (nodular acne) that has not been helped by other treatments, including antibiotics.
    Because Accutane can cause birth defects, Accutane is only for patients who can
    understand and agree to carry out all of the instructions in the iPLEDGE program.
    Accutane may cause serious mental health problems."

    Please provide us with factual evidence that proves the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has posted false information. Also, please post your source for death rates related to minocyline and accutane. Oh, and what was the point of the negative rep,
    If you take the FDA as the holy grail on information then you are the fool. Did you know water can kill you? Bottomline is your a moron..
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    Quote Originally Posted by joebo View Post
    If you take the FDA as the holy grail on information then you are the fool. Did you know water can kill you? Bottomline is your a moron..
    I don't take the FDA as the "holy grail", I do however have faith in their information being accurate. What the hell does water intoxication have to do with accutane and minocycline anyways?
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    Quote Originally Posted by harleyman89 View Post
    I don't take the FDA as the "holy grail", I do however have faith in their information being accurate. What the hell does water intoxication have to do with accutane and minocycline anyways?
    The fact that the FDA has crazy warnings about everything out there. Hell, 3/4 of the supplements you take probably would have warnings that they may kill you if the FDA had their hands in it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by joebo View Post
    If you take the FDA as the holy grail on information then you are the fool. Did you know water can kill you? Bottomline is your a moron..
    I agree, you have a better chance of dieing from walking out of your house in the morning than dieing from accutane.
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    CAT FIGHT! lol j/k but guys i really appreciate all your input im going to talk to a dermatologist and see whats up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Afrochowder View Post
    CAT FIGHT! lol j/k but guys i really appreciate all your input im going to talk to a dermatologist and see whats up.
    First attack is usual through oral antibiotics and a topical cream of some sort. A dermatologist should always take this route first. I'm 28 though, so my acne, although moderate, should not be a problem at my age. Dealing with it as long as I have, it was time to say bye to acne forever, hopefully. In one month on 10mg of accutane, my skin is so much better, healthier looking, and smooth. Besides some remaining red marks from old acne, I'm perfectly clear and happy. Accutane attacks the cause of acne rather than trying to just put out a fire temporarily. If your like me and are lucky to have acne as an adult, then I do not believe you will find much luck with oral antibiotics especially if its on your neck and back. My face I could always keep fairly clear. My neck was always the worst for me and back a close second. Antibiotics and topicals never helped much in those areas, plus topicals tend to be too harsh to use on your neck and just cause more irritation.
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