millennium zmk have an ingredient that lowers test,why????????? - AnabolicMinds.com

millennium zmk have an ingredient that lowers test,why?????????

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    millennium zmk have an ingredient that lowers test,why?????????


    Molybdenum lowers testosterone level


    Men with high levels of the metal molybdenum in their blood also have a lower testosterone level than normal. Epidemiologists at the University of Michigan discovered this when they analysed blood samples from two hundred men who were undergoing treatment at an infertility clinic.

    Molybdenum is in our food. About twenty enzymes that are involved in protein synthesis, growth processes and oxidation in the body need the metal. We consume about 0.3 mg molybdenum every day. The body of an adult man contains about 10 mg of the metal.


    Supplements manufacturers added molybdenum to vitamin pills for years. But recently they?ve become more cautious. Molybdenum is now only found in a limited number of products, e.g. the one pictured here, the Multiple Vitamin for Men Adam Superior. [Link] One pill supplies the modest amount of 50 mcg of molybdenum.

    A more unusual product is the WaterOz Ionic Molybdenum: water in which the manufacturer has dissolved molybdenum. [Link] A teaspoon a day protects men from impotence and other complaints, the maker claims.


    But if you look at the University of Michigan study, which will be published shortly in Fertility & Sterility, you might wonder whether it?s worth raising your molybdenum level. The concentration of molybdenum in the blood turns out to be the most powerful predictor of testosterone concentration that the researchers could find. The simplified table below shows the three strongest relations between the concentration of metals and testosterone that the researchers found.

    <70th: the seventy percent of the men with a relatively less high level; 85th: the fifteen percent of the men with a relatively high level.
    The lower the figure P, the more significant the relationship. Copper and zinc raise the level of testosterone, although the relationship shown for zinc is not statistically significant.

    The testosterone-lowering effect of molybdenum was especially noticeable in men with little zinc in their blood.

    Conclusion: the amount of molybdenum in the body is not significantly affected by taking supplements. Let?s be honest, environmental pollution is a more important factor.

    Molybdenum lowers testosterone level

    I was taking this supp but now I have a lot of doubts in its formulation, why supplement with molybdenum?
    I believe its completely useless and potential harmful to test synthesis , so why put it on the formula?
    I just want a rational explanation cause 1 serving of zmk has more than 100% of the daily needs of this mineral
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    i would also like to hear a explanation on this
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    Your question is valid but out of the entire formulation I never thought I'd be here defending molybdenum’s inclusion in ZMK. No offense

    Molybdenum is an “essential” trace element that "athletes" in particular burn through quite fast much like zinc, magnesium and other minerals compared to the average male that gets little to no exercise on a daily basis. Molybdenum levels in inactive males (and females) can often be skewed in relation to zinc and copper especially when adequate zinc and copper levels aren’t ingested or present or if the individuals have been exposed to particular environmental pollutants that may cause an elevation in total metal count.

    Molybdenum has many valuable functions in the body aiding in proper mental function and sense of well being, proper amino acid metabolism, enzymatic facilitation on iron and nitrogenous waste, carbohydrate metabolism, tissue oxygenation and sleep induction, all of which are essential to the proper functioning of an “athlete” on a daily basis.

    To say that molybdenum itself is solely responsible for lowering of testosterone is irresponsible because there are other factors involved especially when the low test is coupled by “low” zinc and copper levels and “elevated” molybdenum levels. Symptoms of molybdenum deficiency are depressed growth, anemia, low appetite and impaired reproduction and fertility (to name a few) which is contrary to the U of M study sited on “fertility and sterility” which would point to other factors being involved like zinc and copper deficiency which weren’t completely addressed. High levels of molybdenum can affect levels of copper and possibly zinc which would cause some of the issues described in your sited article. The study information posted didn't mention anything about the people's lifestyles, diet or exercise regimen either.

    The 75mcg level of molybdenum set forth by the FDA is actually low for athletes that blow through minerals like crazy. The 80mcg in ZMK is meant to be taken as supplemental mineral support because contrary to popular belief we don’t get much in our diets even if we are eating 100% organic. Soil depletion has leached much of the vital minerals (including molybdenum) out of our food including typically molybdenum rich grains, dairy, organ meats and legumes. So unless the soil your food is grown in is toxic and harbors high levels of molybdenum from industrial pollutants there are little worries about excessive intake.

    In my professional opinion 80mcg of molybdenum isn’t anywhere near a level that could adversely affect testosterone levels in a healthy active person especially when combined with 30mg of highly bioavailable krebs chelated zinc as found in ZMK. If ZMK was void of zinc and copper and taken by a couch potato in higher doses then perhaps (it’s still doubtful) there would be an issue but I attest that ZMK will only raise test levels not lower them. Remember that athletes are chronically low on mineral content and we offer a balanced formula for the athlete with ZMK. I would agree that molybdenum levels could be a “predictor” in testosterone concentrations but that doesn’t mean that it is time to demonize the mineral without looking at the true picture. There are other factors or deficiencies at work here and molybdenum in ZMK isn’t the enemy of your test levels.

    BTW, smoking pot lowers zinc, copper and test levels but tends to leave molybdenum levels unchanged. Maybe everyone in the study was a pothead seeking fertility treatment. Just saying
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millennium 1 View Post
    Your question is valid but out of the entire formulation I never thought I'd be here defending molybdenum’s inclusion in ZMK. No offense

    Molybdenum is an “essential” trace element that "athletes" in particular burn through quite fast much like zinc, magnesium and other minerals compared to the average male that gets little to no exercise on a daily basis. Molybdenum levels in inactive males (and females) can often be skewed in relation to zinc and copper especially when adequate zinc and copper levels aren’t ingested or present or if the individuals have been exposed to particular environmental pollutants that may cause an elevation in total metal count.

    Molybdenum has many valuable functions in the body aiding in proper mental function and sense of well being, proper amino acid metabolism, enzymatic facilitation on iron and nitrogenous waste, carbohydrate metabolism, tissue oxygenation and sleep induction, all of which are essential to the proper functioning of an “athlete” on a daily basis.

    To say that molybdenum itself is solely responsible for lowering of testosterone is irresponsible because there are other factors involved especially when the low test is coupled by “low” zinc and copper levels and “elevated” molybdenum levels. Symptoms of molybdenum deficiency are depressed growth, anemia, low appetite and impaired reproduction and fertility (to name a few) which is contrary to the U of M study sited on “fertility and sterility” which would point to other factors being involved like zinc and copper deficiency which weren’t completely addressed. High levels of molybdenum can affect levels of copper and possibly zinc which would cause some of the issues described in your sited article. The study information posted didn't mention anything about the people's lifestyles, diet or exercise regimen either.

    The 75mcg level of molybdenum set forth by the FDA is actually low for athletes that blow through minerals like crazy. The 80mcg in ZMK is meant to be taken as supplemental mineral support because contrary to popular belief we don’t get much in our diets even if we are eating 100% organic. Soil depletion has leached much of the vital minerals (including molybdenum) out of our food including typically molybdenum rich grains, dairy, organ meats and legumes. So unless the soil your food is grown in is toxic and harbors high levels of molybdenum from industrial pollutants there are little worries about excessive intake.

    In my professional opinion 80mcg of molybdenum isn’t anywhere near a level that could adversely affect testosterone levels in a healthy active person especially when combined with 30mg of highly bioavailable krebs chelated zinc as found in ZMK. If ZMK was void of zinc and copper and taken by a couch potato in higher doses then perhaps (it’s still doubtful) there would be an issue but I attest that ZMK will only raise test levels not lower them. Remember that athletes are chronically low on mineral content and we offer a balanced formula for the athlete with ZMK. I would agree that molybdenum levels could be a “predictor” in testosterone concentrations but that doesn’t mean that it is time to demonize the mineral without looking at the true picture. There are other factors or deficiencies at work here and molybdenum in ZMK isn’t the enemy of your test levels.

    BTW, smoking pot lowers zinc, copper and test levels but tends to leave molybdenum levels unchanged. Maybe everyone in the study was a pothead seeking fertility treatment. Just saying
    good post and it makes sense, thanks for your reply
    the only thing that I still have doubts its after all whats the dosage required by an athlete , I ask cause when I look to my other supplements I see that some of them have molybdenum also , so I stay a little confused in how I should dose the zmk
    Thanks again for your quick reply
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    What other supplements do you take that include Molybdenum, if you don't mind me asking?

    Also good reply Matt. Athletes really do burn through vitamins & minerals to repair our bodies. Hopefully we get extra nutrients from all those calories we consume (Although many guys consume lots of empty calories PWO ) I'm making my rounds through various multi's. From the Costco one, on to NOW Adam, now trying CL's Orange Triad. To be honest I haven't noticed any difference from any of them, probably because of my diet and all the veggies I eat already. MVP/ZMK might be my next one to try though, it seems to be way above the others.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steveoph View Post
    What other supplements do you take that include Molybdenum, if you don't mind me asking?

    Also good reply Matt. Athletes really do burn through vitamins & minerals to repair our bodies. Hopefully we get extra nutrients from all those calories we consume (Although many guys consume lots of empty calories PWO ) I'm making my rounds through various multi's. From the Costco one, on to NOW Adam, now trying CL's Orange Triad. To be honest I haven't noticed any difference from any of them, probably because of my diet and all the veggies I eat already. MVP/ZMK might be my next one to try though, it seems to be way above the others.
    for the moment I`m only taking(with molybdenum) bio -pro blen protein from est, but a lot of pre-wo supps have it on their formulation too.
    with 2 servings of bio-pro you`ll have 150% of the daily requirement of MLBD, IF I take the zmk I`ll have >250%, not counting with food and environmental pollution , I think that if we count them we will take more than 500% , so I think its maybe to much but I´m not sure.
    Last edited by nunes; 12-03-2008 at 08:37 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by nunes View Post
    for the moment I`m only taking(with molybdenum) bio -pro blen protein from est, but a lot of pre-wo supps have it on their formulation too.
    with 2 servings of bio-pro you`ll have 150% of the daily requirement of MLBD, IF I take the zmk I`ll have >250%, not counting with food and environmental pollution , I think that if we count them we will take more than 500% , so I think its maybe to much but I´m not sure.
    One thing to keep in mind is that the US RDA values for any given vitamin or mineral are very low and specifically in place to ward off symptoms of deficiency. Typically healthy adults need between 2 and 10 times the US RDA value of many vitamins and minerals and athletes can process and utilize more. In the case of molybdenum the US RDA value is set at 75mcg to help ward off depressed growth, low appetite, impaired reproduction and infertility as well as to ensure proper enzymatic function which is "vital" to so many physiological functions. An athlete can easily utilize 600mcg to 900mcg (800% to 1200%) daily without any issues and most likely more. You would need to be exposed to "large" amounts of molybdenum (5000mcg to 60000mcg) on a chronic basis to cause noticeable side effects like fatigue or headache. Human toxicity levels aren't really established but but they may range somewhere between 5mg/kg body weight to 10mg/kg of bodyweight which is a huge level.

    You ingesting 500% of the US RDA value of molybdenum is nothing to worry about and it won't affect your testosterone levels at all; especially when combined with zinc and copper as found in ZMK.
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    I like it when Matt posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Poppa S View Post
    I like it when Matt posts
    Just because he's smarter, and the owner, and probably cooler....well shoot...that doesn't make him better than me...

    yah...maybe it does
    Millennium Sport Technologies Representative/Sponsored Athlete
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millennium 1 View Post
    One thing to keep in mind is that the US RDA values for any given vitamin or mineral are very low and specifically in place to ward off symptoms of deficiency. Typically healthy adults need between 2 and 10 times the US RDA value of many vitamins and minerals and athletes can process and utilize more. In the case of molybdenum the US RDA value is set at 75mcg to help ward off depressed growth, low appetite, impaired reproduction and infertility as well as to ensure proper enzymatic function which is "vital" to so many physiological functions. An athlete can easily utilize 600mcg to 900mcg (800% to 1200%) daily without any issues and most likely more. You would need to be exposed to "large" amounts of molybdenum (5000mcg to 60000mcg) on a chronic basis to cause noticeable side effects like fatigue or headache. Human toxicity levels aren't really established but but they may range somewhere between 5mg/kg body weight to 10mg/kg of bodyweight which is a huge level.

    You ingesting 500% of the US RDA value of molybdenum is nothing to worry about and it won't affect your testosterone levels at all; especially when combined with zinc and copper as found in ZMK.
    thanks for your answer, I was a little concerned with this MLBD s*it, but you guys seem to know what you`re doing so you have my vote of trust
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