Injury recovery , any suggestions needed!

  1. Injury recovery , any suggestions needed!


    Iím 19, and played collegiate football for a season then had my career cut short by a number of injuries. Most of my injuries have healed with time and rest, however, thereís one inflammatory injury that hasnít gone away. Cortisone shots and hot/cold therapy have given me almost 0 progress. Iíd like to return playing and would be very appreciative to anyone who has suggestions for a strong anti inflammatory/joint supplement!


  2. Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter26 View Post
    I’m 19, and played collegiate football for a season then had my career cut short by a number of injuries. Most of my injuries have healed with time and rest, however, there’s one inflammatory injury that hasn’t gone away. Cortisone shots and hot/cold therapy have given me almost 0 progress. I’d like to return playing and would be very appreciative to anyone who has suggestions for a strong anti inflammatory/joint supplement!
    What is the injury? For OTC joint support I prefer Genoflex. Cissus quadrangularis is a good ingredient in most quality joint supps that you can also buy in bulk for cheap. I'm also experimenting with types I,II, and III Collagen but it's too soon for a verdict. For my worst injuries I've experimented with BPC-157 and TB-500. BPC-157 absolutely made a big difference. TB-500 did not present a noticeable improvement.
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  3. Quote Originally Posted by Jebrook View Post
    What is the injury? For OTC joint support I prefer Genoflex. Cissus quadrangularis is a good ingredient in most quality joint supps that you can also buy in bulk for cheap. I'm also experimenting with types I,II, and III Collagen but it's too soon for a verdict. For my worst injuries I've experimented with BPC-157 and TB-500. BPC-157 absolutely made a big difference. TB-500 did not present a noticeable improvement.
    Itís called a sesamoid fracture. Sesamoid are bones that arenít attached to anything, but instead are inside a tendon for support. There are two pea-sized bones under the big toe joint and one of them shattered due to stress and pounding. Like an idiot, I played through it and took just about everything to play. It only got worse, and left me with limited mobility in my big toe, which as you can guess effected my power and speed greatly. Itís really just an inflammation and joint mobility issue. For some people this injury happens and they get the inflammation in the joint to subside , but for some it lingers

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Jebrook View Post
    What is the injury? For OTC joint support I prefer Genoflex. Cissus quadrangularis is a good ingredient in most quality joint supps that you can also buy in bulk for cheap. I'm also experimenting with types I,II, and III Collagen but it's too soon for a verdict. For my worst injuries I've experimented with BPC-157 and TB-500. BPC-157 absolutely made a big difference. TB-500 did not present a noticeable improvement.
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  5. Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter26 View Post
    It’s called a sesamoid fracture. Sesamoid are bones that aren’t attached to anything, but instead are inside a tendon for support. There are two pea-sized bones under the big toe joint and one of them shattered due to stress and pounding. Like an idiot, I played through it and took just about everything to play. It only got worse, and left me with limited mobility in my big toe, which as you can guess effected my power and speed greatly. It’s really just an inflammation and joint mobility issue. For some people this injury happens and they get the inflammation in the joint to subside , but for some it lingers
    That is definitely an injury that would be tough to deal with. I would look into BPC-157 as it been shown in research studies to repair, tendon, ligaments, and bones. I've had great luck with it to assist in healing after an acromioplasty procedure to fix some nasty rotator impingement syndrome and reduce pain in my knee from a repaired ACL rupture several years after the surgical repair.

    Here's a link for BPC info:

    https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/art...o-use-bpc-157/
    Last edited by Jebrook; 09-24-2017 at 11:29 AM. Reason: Added info
    OLYMPUS LABS/OLYMPUS UK REP

    E-mail product questions to [email protected]
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter26 View Post
    Itís called a sesamoid fracture. Sesamoid are bones that arenít attached to anything, but instead are inside a tendon for support. There are two pea-sized bones under the big toe joint and one of them shattered due to stress and pounding. Like an idiot, I played through it and took just about everything to play. It only got worse, and left me with limited mobility in my big toe, which as you can guess effected my power and speed greatly. Itís really just an inflammation and joint mobility issue. For some people this injury happens and they get the inflammation in the joint to subside , but for some it lingers
    How long ago was this? I know rest is a really ****ty answer but were you ever put in a boot for this? Bpc can help with this. Also being consistent on ibuprofen, to get itís anti inflammatory effects you need to be taking 3-4 800mg doses per day for 4 weeks. I like orange triad for my joint support along with some triple strength fish oils. Animal flex is a good option too and they just started making it in a powder.

  7. I would look into finding a chiro or pt who does Graston and will do it fairly aggressively. Gotta get some movement into that tendon to allow better mobility in the toe. I would also work on the plantar fascia and muscles in the medial arch of the foot. They r probably bound up and right as well trying to stabilize the joint. As far as cortisone injections I would try to avoid those. Inflammation is a part of healing so all the shot does it get rid of all the healing aspects of inflammation. I would look into more herbal like boswellia and turmeric and curcumin for anti inflammatory support

  8. Headhunter, did you confirm a fracture in either of the sesamoid bones using x-ray or a bone scan, or is this an unconfirmed diagnosis? If it's a fracture there's no way around it, you'll have to immobilize the big toe joint and ankle to allow the sesamoid bone(s) to heal for 4-6 weeks just like any other bone. This involves wearing a boot/air cast around during that time. With a fracture DO NOT go for any Graston treatment, as the last thing you want with a broken bone is someone pushing on it with hard tools, and forcing range of motion.

    Sometimes the sheath/lining around the bones gets inflamed from overuse, impact, or other trauma. This can be treated conservatively just like with other tendinopathies (rest and the usual). But the s***** part about sesamoiditis is that it's almost impossible to rest the big toe joint because it's used at every step. That's why sesamoiditis can linger for years in most, and make you think you have a broken bone that's just not healing.

    A quick (but by no means conclusive) test to check if any of your sesamoids are broken is to stand on both your bare feet on a hard surface, keeping your feet firmly on the ground. Slowly transfer your weight to the foot with the painful sesamoid and see how you feel. If the more pressure you put on it the more it hurts, you are probably putting pressure on a broken bone. If you can put pressure on it with only minor discomfort, and the REAL pain starts when you try to lengthen the tendon in any way (pulling the toe up or standing on your tip toes, for example), then it's a soft tissue condition/tendinopathy, and there's hope for you to recover a lot faster.

    I'm currently recovering from a soft tissue injury to the sesamoids on my left foot, and my recovery went to light speed when I switched to my current protocol, which I'll outline in my next post. This one is getting long already, but if you suffer from this condition you're probably trying to learn all you can about it because pretty much every source out there is telling you it's almost impossible to beat.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Mike NCR View Post
    Headhunter, did you confirm a fracture in either of the sesamoid bones using x-ray or a bone scan, or is this an unconfirmed diagnosis? If it's a fracture there's no way around it, you'll have to immobilize the big toe joint and ankle to allow the sesamoid bone(s) to heal for 4-6 weeks just like any other bone. This involves wearing a boot/air cast around during that time. With a fracture DO NOT go for any Graston treatment, as the last thing you want with a broken bone is someone pushing on it with hard tools, and forcing range of motion.

    Sometimes the sheath/lining around the bones gets inflamed from overuse, impact, or other trauma. This can be treated conservatively just like with other tendinopathies (rest and the usual). But the s***** part about sesamoiditis is that it's almost impossible to rest the big toe joint because it's used at every step. That's why sesamoiditis can linger for years in most, and make you think you have a broken bone that's just not healing.

    A quick (but by no means conclusive) test to check if any of your sesamoids are broken is to stand on both your bare feet on a hard surface, keeping your feet firmly on the ground. Slowly transfer your weight to the foot with the painful sesamoid and see how you feel. If the more pressure you put on it the more it hurts, you are probably putting pressure on a broken bone. If you can put pressure on it with only minor discomfort, and the REAL pain starts when you try to lengthen the tendon in any way (pulling the toe up or standing on your tip toes, for example), then it's a soft tissue condition/tendinopathy, and there's hope for you to recover a lot faster.

    I'm currently recovering from a soft tissue injury to the sesamoids on my left foot, and my recovery went to light speed when I switched to my current protocol, which I'll outline in my next post. This one is getting long already, but if you suffer from this condition you're probably trying to learn all you can about it because pretty much every source out there is telling you it's almost impossible to beat.
    Yes Iíve had a confirmed X-ray. My outermost Sesamoid on my left foot is completely shattered so healing is far fetched. Iíve tried cortisone shots, and every other thing I can do just about. Surgery is tricky and Iíd rather stay away from it.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter26 View Post
    Yes I’ve had a confirmed X-ray. My outermost Sesamoid on my left foot is completely shattered so healing is far fetched. I’ve tried cortisone shots, and every other thing I can do just about. Surgery is tricky and I’d rather stay away from it.
    That's pretty brutal, buddy. You can mitigate the pain and work around it but if all that's left is little pieces you're just putting a band-aid on the problem. Surgery is inevitable if you want any kind of pain-free walking or running. You're obviously still in a very active/athletic period of your life but having the bone removed doesn't mean complete sidelining. You could modify your running style to barefoot (striking the ground with the outer forefoot), that would result in a shorter toe-off and lessen the involvement of the FHL (the tendon that runs through the sesamoids). I can't post links yet but there's a great intro to the technique on YouTube. Just search "Terra Plana - Learning the skill of barefoot running" there.

  11. For your eventual recovery after whenever you do get the surgery, or for anyone else reading this who's suffering from sesamoiditis, here's my protocol for the condition. I'm sure this will save someone hours of research and weeks or months of pain and hassle.

    Like most people, until my foot actually started to hurt there I had no idea that there were even two little tiny kneecap-style bones right under my big toe joint. It would seem like the absolute worst place to put two little bones, with all the impact the ball of the foot takes. My wake-up call came when one day in early September I was doing single-leg calf raises with a weighted vest and 120lbs dumbbell. I was moving slow and using good form, but felt something pop under my foot. It was a little sore but figured it for wear and tear of moving heavy weight that we all get subjected to and heal from. The next day I did weighted incline pushups with a weight vest plus a backpack on with a couple of plates in it - my feet were up on a solid metal box, with my big toes fully stretched in that elevated position. After two days straight of such abuse, on the 3rd day I had really bad pain bending the toe, and the inside of the ball of my foot burned with each step.

    PHASE 1 (Weeks 1-2): For the first 2 weeks I pretty much did nothing. I figured these aches and pains usually clear up if you stop aggravating them and avoid doing things that cause the pain. To this end I started walking more on the outside edge of my foot. I walked with a limp but who cares, I figured it was only for a few days. I also cut out planks, pushups, calf raises, and anything that put stress on the big toe joint and ball of the foot. I also used Voltaren Extra Strength (I think it's called Voltarol in the US), a topical pain reliever cream (taking oral NSAIDS can hurt your gainz). I also took my usual joint ache combo of time-released Vitamin C 1g twice a day, and MSM 1g 3 times a day. This combo kept things from getting worse, and when the Voltarol was working pain was slightly reduced, but there was still no real improvement.

    PHASE 2 (Weeks 3-4): When I realized after two weeks that the problem was NOT going away, I realized I needed to get serious. I realized that the longer I kept a modified walking gait, the greater the chances I would develop ankle, knee, or hip problems in my left leg. So I needed to seriously research what was going on and find a way to heal fast. What I learned wasn't good! It seems for most folks that once you get Sesamoiditis that you never fully recover, and the condition can linger for years if you don't get off the foot and let things heal. In practice this meant about a month in a boot that freezes your ankle and big toe joint. The Flexor Hallucis Longus tendon (FHL) goes from your big toe joint to your sesamoids to the back of your heel, and connects at the back of your foreleg, so that entire area needs to be immobilized for proper healing. This would be very difficult for me, as I have a busy family life, a job that requires me to walk, run, and jump, and I go stir crazy sitting in a chair. I looked at different foot pads online for taking pressure off the sasamoids, and ordered a few different designs to try out. Some made the rest of my foot hurt, while some worked well for keeping pressure off of my sesamoids, but none fixed the core problem: I had tendinopathy around the sesamoids, specifically the one closest to the inside of my foot, and it was bending the toe upwards/lenghthening the tendon that was killing me. For those with a fracture however, the gel pads may be a godsend - I recommend Jill's Gels dancer pads, as they really keep the pressure off of the sesamoid area.

    PHASE 3 (Weeks 5-6): This is when I really went berserker mode on my sesamoiditis. I'd probably spent a good 20 hours Googling everything in desperation during week 4, and stumbled upon a treatment for sesamoiditis in horses. Yes, HORSES. Apparently these animals frequently get sesamoiditis, and with owners paying a fortune to maintain them and keep them healthy they'll try anything. As I was also ready to try anything, I went for it and used Bragg organic apple cider vinegar. I mixed two tablespoons of the stuff in 2 cups of cold water and chugged it back 3 times a day. DO NOT take it straight, and be careful to rinse your mouth with regular water right after drinking the water-ACV mixture, as the acid in it can rot your teeth. Despite the rinsing my back teeth are killing me after 2 weeks on this stuff, and I've been resorting to brushing with Sensodyne to cut the ache.

    The result: I noticed an immediate drop in pain after 2 days on this protocol. By the end of day 3 I could put my big toe against a wall and very carefully stretch it to the full "up" position without excruciating pain. I would say that after 3 days the pain was at about 50% of what it was when I started on ACV. Don't ask me what the mechanism of action is for this improvement, all I know is that it worked!

    I have to say that I also started using Cissus at 2g a day at around the same time I started downing the ACV. I avoided taking it up til then because I've always found that Cissus slows down my bodybuilding progress (I think because it raises E), but I was willing to try anything. It usually takes about 2 weeks for Cissus to start affecting anything in my experience, so I'm certain that it was the ACV that caused this huge improvement.

    In week two of this phase of declaring war on these two little twerps, I started on BPC-157. Again, this turned out to be a miracle treatment. With two subcutaneous injections of 400mcg into the fat pad just near the sesamoids, by the end of Day 2 of treatment my pain had drastically reduced again. After 7 days on the injections and 14 days on the ACV, my recovery is INSANE. I still have a little bit of pain in my sesamoids area, but a good deal of it is actually from the pin-cushion effect of 14 injections in 7 days into the area!

    I'm going to start some strengthening exercises for the FHL tomorrow (Google "Towel Crunches"), and work on maintaining the range of motion (as it still stiffens up when I don't stretch it), but I'm sure in another 7 days, after 14 more BPC-157 injections and some exercise, I'll be good to go.
    Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go get ready to walk my kid around for a couple of hours of trick-or-treating (WITHOUT major foot pain!)

    Coles Notes/TLDR:

    -Offload as much as possible while recovering
    -Use organic Apple Cider Vinegar - 2 tablespoons in 2 cups of water, 3 times a day
    -Inject with BPC-157 near the sesamoid area (fat pad on inner ball of foot) 400mcg, 2 times a day
    -Use Voltaren/Voltarol to dull some pain if you MUST to do something on your feet
    -When pain begins to subside, gently stretch the big toe upward against a wall or furniture (don't overdo it) and build the FHL tendon up with some gentle strength work.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter26 View Post
    I’m 19, and played collegiate football for a season then had my career cut short by a number of injuries. Most of my injuries have healed with time and rest, however, there’s one inflammatory injury that hasn’t gone away. Cortisone shots and hot/cold therapy have given me almost 0 progress. I’d like to return playing and would be very appreciative to anyone who has suggestions for a strong anti inflammatory/joint supplement!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJWn1SRRMKY&t=59s
    Millennium Sport Technologies Representative
    Mind and Muscle Code AM10
    Classic Physique competitor, Facebook- Great Physique Fitness, Online coaching
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