Self Improvement Books

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  1. Self Improvement Books


    Can anyone recommend some of these? Iíve been in a slump of slight depression, low motivation, drinking more than Iíd like when I go out. I figured reading is one of the only things I havenít tried yet.

    I just started Mind Hacking by Sir John Hargrave, not sure if itís a good one but it sounded interesting and I was able to download it for free. Lol

    Iím not religious so Iíd prefer no books directly based on that. I donít care if the author is as long as it isnít biased towards a religion.


  2. Pimp
    By ice burg slim.

    Job
    Old testemant

    Look up documentary or info regarding inmates in California who have indeterminate segregated housing.
    Some of those guys have been in solitary confinement for over a decade.
    You put a man in environment where its kill or be killed.
    And then you put him in a smaller cage when he acts like an animal.
    Those guys are being force fed because they refuse to eat.
    They are white as ghosts and skinny like a greyhound.

    I'm sure you be got it better than those guys youngster.
    •   
       


  3. Don't stay home, get in the gym and get shredded or lift heavy books?

  4. I’m not sure either of you understand what I’m saying.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by rascal14 View Post
    Iím not sure either of you understand what Iím saying.
    I wasn't trying to be a dick.
    Those are good books
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  6. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a [email protected]#% by Mark Manson is a good one and I really do not like self help books or believe most of them actually help. Tim Ferriss has a couple alright ones, so check out his website and podcast if you don't feel like checking out his books.

    Both of these authors base most of their ideas on Stoicism and I can recommend further reading on that if you're interested, although warning that most of it is going to be fairly dense philosophy and not self help. The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday though is a good way to start though as it gives a short quote from a Stoic philosopher with an explanation on how you can implement that quote each day.
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  7. Self Improvement Books


    Quote Originally Posted by Aleksandar37 View Post
    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a [email protected]#% by Mark Manson is a good one and I really do not like self help books or believe most of them actually help. Tim Ferriss has a couple alright ones, so check out his website and podcast if you don't feel like checking out his books.

    Both of these authors base most of their ideas on Stoicism and I can recommend further reading on that if you're interested, although warning that most of it is going to be fairly dense philosophy and not self help. The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday though is a good way to start though as it gives a short quote from a Stoic philosopher with an explanation on how you can implement that quote each day.
    I was going to mention Marcus Aureliusí Meditations and Epictetusí Discourses and Handbook.

    Iíd say that theyíre some of the best self help books out there. One thing I like about the Stoics is that theyíre very practical, and I find they donít spend much time on dense/abstract/hypothetical/theoretical philosophy, but a lot on practical ways to be able to be happy and equal regardless of your circumstances, not because of them.

    Iíd also say that the Dhammapada (sayings of the Buddha) and the Tao Te Ching are also pretty short reads packed full of value, but they have more of a learning curve to really get a lot out of them.

    The Bhagavad Gita is also great, but it isnít short, and having an annotated/explained version makes a world of difference. I like Eknath Easwaranís Bhagavad Gita for Daily Reading.

    I do really like that The Stoics are pretty easy to understand and apply without any real background into theology, and that it can be applied to a variety of theologies or lack thereof. For example, early Christians loved the Stoics, and many atheists love them today. Itís just so practical and direct; itís a rare logical philosophy really.

    Edit: Iíve also found that none of the books Iíve mentioned really push a religion on anyone at all. Hell, Iíve heard people argue the Stoics were polytheistic, monotheistic, and atheist, so theyíre definitely not pushing anything. Easwaran talks about all sorts of religions in his commentary on the Gita, including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Taoism (Tao Te Ching) in its original form isnít really even a religion IMO, and the Dhammapada (Buddhism) is never forceful in insisting you believe anything; the Buddha himself said not to believe anything just because he said it, but that we should test it for ourselves.

    I think Iíd recommend starting with the Stoics though.
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  8. 9EEF394D-9A03-4F2A-8794-18AE80FED130-3677-00000257EFB5BA30.jpg
    Iíd recommend this edition of Epictetusí works first. I bought a fancier hardcover after, but this one is great and affordable.

    Iíd start with the Handbook, which is short. Like the title suggests, itís a small handbook for the basics of Stoicism that you can refer back to.

    From there Iíd read Discourses, which is his much longer teachings and lessons on various aspects of Stoic philosophy, as if you were his student.

    Then you can finish with Fragments, which are more short pieces he wrote.
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  9. Quote Originally Posted by Aleksandar37 View Post
    The Subtle Art of Not Giving a [email protected]#% by Mark Manson is a good one and I really do not like self help books or believe most of them actually help. Tim Ferriss has a couple alright ones, so check out his website and podcast if you don't feel like checking out his books.

    Both of these authors base most of their ideas on Stoicism and I can recommend further reading on that if you're interested, although warning that most of it is going to be fairly dense philosophy and not self help. The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday though is a good way to start though as it gives a short quote from a Stoic philosopher with an explanation on how you can implement that quote each day.
    Podcasts are even better, actually. I'll check those out, I remember hearing about Mark Manson's book before.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    9EEF394D-9A03-4F2A-8794-18AE80FED130-3677-00000257EFB5BA30.jpg
    I’d recommend this edition of Epictetus’ works first. I bought a fancier hardcover after, but this one is great and affordable.

    I’d start with the Handbook, which is short. Like the title suggests, it’s a small handbook for the basics of Stoicism that you can refer back to.

    From there I’d read Discourses, which is his much longer teachings and lessons on various aspects of Stoic philosophy, as if you were his student.

    Then you can finish with Fragments, which are more short pieces he wrote.
    Thank you for all that, I remember hearing some about The Stoics in some courses I took a couple years ago. I definitely do not mind learning of other religions, I enjoy it. I think religion has a lot of good things everyone should know and practice.

    I just know some of the books my buddy reads push Christianity super hard and that would just annoy me more than anything to read. I grew up Southern Baptist for the majority of my life so I am familiar with that pretty well.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by rascal14 View Post
    Thank you for all that, I remember hearing some about The Stoics in some courses I took a couple years ago. I definitely do not mind learning of other religions, I enjoy it. I think religion has a lot of good things everyone should know and practice, but I know some of the books my buddy reads push Christianity super hard and that would just annoy me more than anything to read. Pray the gay away type of things you hear in Southern Baptist churches.. lol
    Trust me, Iíve seen enough ďaccept Jesus or burn in Hell. Whatever else you believe is wrong and I have to tell that to you because I love youĒ stuff to not want anything to do with it either. That said, Iíve read some good ďChristianĒ books, but none of them were pushing anything. For example, the Good Heart is a book based on the dialogues between the Dalai Lama and Laurence Freeman, a Catholic priest and Benedictine monk. Theyíre likely stronger in their beliefs than just about anyone, but they are still able to respect each otherís views and have meaningful conversation and learn from each other instead of attacking each other or trying to convert each other.
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  12. Quote Originally Posted by rascal14 View Post
    Thank you for all that, I remember hearing some about The Stoics in some courses I took a couple years ago. I definitely do not mind learning of other religions, I enjoy it. I think religion has a lot of good things everyone should know and practice.

    I just know some of the books my buddy reads push Christianity super hard and that would just annoy me more than anything to read. I grew up Southern Baptist for the majority of my life so I am familiar with that pretty well.
    Just to clarify, Stoicism is not a religion. Many books have drawn parallels between Stoicism and various religions, but it's not a religion itself.
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  13. Quote Originally Posted by Aleksandar37 View Post
    Just to clarify, Stoicism is not a religion. Many books have drawn parallels between Stoicism and various religions, but it's not a religion itself.
    Oh okay. I didn’t remember learning of it as a religion, but I didn’t know for sure that it wasn’t.

    I got the audio book for The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*** for now, I may pick up a hard copy though. I’ve never listened to an audiobook so I’ll have to see how I like it. I will have to order Epictetus works’, the store didn’t have it in stock.
  14. If I live every moment believing, then the chaos in my heart will be a beautiful thing.-
    I am in love, but not in love with someone or something, I am in love with my life. And for the first time, in a long time, everything is inspiring.-

  15. This is by a professor I follow on LinkedIn.

    IMG_0578.jpg
    If I live every moment believing, then the chaos in my heart will be a beautiful thing.-
    I am in love, but not in love with someone or something, I am in love with my life. And for the first time, in a long time, everything is inspiring.-

  16. Quote Originally Posted by Aleksandar37 View Post
    Just to clarify, Stoicism is not a religion. Many books have drawn parallels between Stoicism and various religions, but it's not a religion itself.
    Yep. Itís quite interesting actually; many early Christians loved the Stoics and said Stoicism was compatible with Christianity, but later Christians changed their mind and criticized the Stoics, and now Stoicism is popular with all sorts of people who may or may not have strong theological beliefs, and is a popular source for self-help books to draw from.

    Itís nice to see the Stoics getting some love lol.
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  17. Quote Originally Posted by rascal14 View Post
    Can anyone recommend some of these? I’ve been in a slump of slight depression, low motivation, drinking more than I’d like when I go out. I figured reading is one of the only things I haven’t tried yet.

    I just started Mind Hacking by Sir John Hargrave, not sure if it’s a good one but it sounded interesting and I was able to download it for free. Lol

    I’m not religious so I’d prefer no books directly based on that. I don’t care if the author is as long as it isn’t biased towards a religion.


    Send me a PM and I'll tell you the books that shaped much of my life.

    Honestly, I don't know if they count as self-improvement in a strict sense, but I guarantee you that they will contain the USEFUL kind of wisdom instead of the overly positive bull**** being espoused by a lot of idiots. They will teach you about a realistic way of living a life full of successes.

  18. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    Send me a PM and I'll tell you the books that shaped much of my life.

    Honestly, I don't know if they count as self-improvement in a strict sense, but I guarantee you that they will contain the USEFUL kind of wisdom instead of the overly positive bull**** being espoused by a lot of idiots. They will teach you about a realistic way of living a life full of successes.
    Are these books so secret that you canít mention them so we can all think about looking into them?
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  19. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Yep. It’s quite interesting actually; many early Christians loved the Stoics and said Stoicism was compatible with Christianity, but later Christians changed their mind and criticized the Stoics, and now Stoicism is popular with all sorts of people who may or may not have strong theological beliefs, and is a popular source for self-help books to draw from.

    It’s nice to see the Stoics getting some love lol.
    By any chance, have you read Meditations by Marcus Aurelius?

    I read a few pages of it, not enough to decide whether it's worth the money or not.

  20. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    By any chance, have you read Meditations by Marcus Aurelius?

    I read a few pages of it, not enough to decide whether it's worth the money or not.
    I have two copies of it haha. I really enjoyed it. It was likely never meant to be published, so itís different than most books, but I find it is very direct and genuine. It doesnít pull an punches, and some people say it can be a bit pessimistic at times, but I found it very motivating and full of logical wisdom that I try to apply in my life. Lots of emphasis on how we can learn not to depend on others or external circumstances for happiness, and how we should focus on what is on our control in life.

    That and Epictetus are great. Epictetusí works are written more like a teacher to a student, so the two together give a great course in Stoicism from the OGs.
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    For less than $4 on Amazon Prime, Iíd say itís worth it. I bought this one, read it, then bought a hardcover edition.

    Itís also available to read online for free, but thereís something nice about a physical book for this sort of thing IMO.
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  22. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Are these books so secret that you canít mention them so we can all think about looking into them?
    You know what? Screw it. I'll just flat out say what they are. lol...

    For starters, the best book by the author is The 48 Laws of Power, followed by The 50th Law. Honestly, I'd prioritize his other book, The 33 Strategies of War over The 50th Law but it's a personal bias. The 33 Strategies of War is a personal favorite of mine.

    He also wrote The Art of Seduction and Mastery, but I didn't like them as much. Stick to the ones above.

    The author's name is Robert Greene. Here's an interview of him by Barry Kibrick.

    Edit: Can't post link... Just look it up on youtube. I recommend watching the one where Kibrick interviewed him about The 48 Laws...

  23. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    I have two copies of it haha. I really enjoyed it. It was likely never meant to be published, so it’s different than most books, but I find it is very direct and genuine. It doesn’t pull an punches, and some people say it can be a bit pessimistic at times, but I found it very motivating and full of logical wisdom that I try to apply in my life. Lots of emphasis on how we can learn not to depend on others or external circumstances for happiness, and how we should focus on what is on our control in life.

    That and Epictetus are great. Epictetus’ works are written more like a teacher to a student, so the two together give a great course in Stoicism from the OGs.
    Thank you very much.

  24. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    You know what? Screw it. I'll just flat out say what they are. lol...

    For starters, the best book by the author is The 48 Laws of Power, followed by The 50th Law. Honestly, I'd prioritize his other book, The 33 Strategies of War over The 50th Law but it's a personal bias. The 33 Strategies of War is a personal favorite of mine.

    He also wrote The Art of Seduction and Mastery, but I didn't like them as much. Stick to the ones above.

    The author's name is Robert Greene. Here's an interview of him by Barry Kibrick.

    Edit: Can't post link... Just look it up on youtube. I recommend watching the one where Kibrick interviewed him about The 48 Laws...
    Thanks. Interesting. Would the 33 Strategies of War happen to draw from the Art of War? I really enjoyed the latter, but have never heard of the former. I may have to check it out.
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  25. 48 laws of power is good. 50th law as well.
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