Self Improvement Books

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  1. Interesting. Iíll have to check them out!
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  2. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Thanks. Interesting. Would the 33 Strategies of War happen to draw from the Art of War? I really enjoyed the latter, but have never heard of the former. I may have to check it out.
    I like The 33 Strategies of War more than I like The 48 Laws of Power. But I will admit that The 48 Laws of Power may very well be his best book.

    The 33 Strategies of War draws wisdom from Sun Tzu, yes. But it also draws from Carl Von Clausewitz, Napoleon Bonaparte, and even the ****ing Bible. No joke. He quoted Job 7:1, which says The life of man upon earth is a warfare. Pretty cool stuff.

    Here's a quote that Robert Greene quoted from Sun Tzu, including it in the book... I have it memorized and I request that you give me a few rep points for posting it here. lol. You don't have to if you don't want to. Here's the quote...

    He whom the ancients called an expert in battle gained victory where victory was easily gained. Thus, the battle of the expert is never an exceptional victory, nor does it win him reputation for wisdom or credit for courage. His victories in battle are unerring. Unerring means that he acts where victory is certain and conquers an enemy that has already lost.

    Sun Tzu, The Art of War, 4th century BC.
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  3. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    I like The 33 Strategies of War more than I like The 48 Laws of Power. But I will admit that The 48 Laws of Power may very well be his best book.

    The 33 Strategies of War draws wisdom from Sun Tzu, yes. But it also draws from Carl Von Clausewitz, Napoleon Bonaparte, and even the ****ing Bible. No joke. He quoted Job 7:1, which says The life of man upon earth is a warfare. Pretty cool stuff.

    Here's a quote that Robert Greene quoted from Sun Tzu, including it in the book... I have it memorized and I request that you give me a few rep points for posting it here. lol. You don't have to if you don't want to. Here's the quote...

    He whom the ancients called an expert in battle gained victory where victory was easily gained. Thus, the battle of the expert is never an exceptional victory, nor does it win him reputation for wisdom or credit for courage. His victories in battle are unerring. Unerring means that he acts where victory is certain and conquers an enemy that has already lost.

    Sun Tzu, The Art of War, 4th century BC.
    Sounds like floyd mayweather read that too.
  4. Self Improvement Books


    Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    I like The 33 Strategies of War more than I like The 48 Laws of Power. But I will admit that The 48 Laws of Power may very well be his best book.

    The 33 Strategies of War draws wisdom from Sun Tzu, yes. But it also draws from Carl Von Clausewitz, Napoleon Bonaparte, and even the ****ing Bible. No joke. He quoted Job 7:1, which says The life of man upon earth is a warfare. Pretty cool stuff.

    Here's a quote that Robert Greene quoted from Sun Tzu, including it in the book... I have it memorized and I request that you give me a few rep points for posting it here. lol. You don't have to if you don't want to. Here's the quote...

    He whom the ancients called an expert in battle gained victory where victory was easily gained. Thus, the battle of the expert is never an exceptional victory, nor does it win him reputation for wisdom or credit for courage. His victories in battle are unerring. Unerring means that he acts where victory is certain and conquers an enemy that has already lost.

    Sun Tzu, The Art of War, 4th century BC.
    Repped since you asked, and because it's a solid post haha

    I'll check them out. I enjoy reading a wide variety of books, so I'm interested in books to pull together multiple beliefs/philosophies/etc in a way that makes sense (some books do it amazingly well, and some are clearly trying to shove a round peg in a square hole). I'll try to take a picture of some of the books I have. As Ron Burgundy once said, "I have many leather-bound books," but I don't have an apartment that smells of rich mahogany.

    Edit: some books;
    IMG_9531.jpgIMG_9532.jpgIMG_9533.jpg
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  5. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Repped since you asked, and because it's a solid post haha

    I'll check them out. I enjoy reading a wide variety of books, so I'm interested in books to pull together multiple beliefs/philosophies/etc in a way that makes sense (some books do it amazingly well, and some are clearly trying to shove a round peg in a square hole). I'll try to take a picture of some of the books I have. As Ron Burgundy once said, "I have many leather-bound books," but I don't have an apartment that smells of rich mahogany.

    Edit: some books;
    IMG_9531.jpgIMG_9532.jpgIMG_9533.jpg
    Dude, you have a book called Jesus Calling? So you're a Christian?? Me as well! I'm glad to meet a fellow Christian like myself, even if it's just online.

    A lot of atheists in this world are missing out. LOL
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    Dude, you have a book called Jesus Calling? So you're a Christian?? Me as well! I'm glad to meet a fellow Christian like myself, even if it's just online.

    A lot of atheists in this world are missing out. LOL
    Did you also see my two copies of the Bible, the Nag Hammadi scriptures, and Yoganandaís commentary on the Gospel?

    I donít think Iím your traditional Christian though, as I canít say I think that being a Christian is the only way to get to heaven or salvation or whatever you want to call it. One of the best analogies Iíve heard comes from the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who also talks about Jesus, Thich Nhat Hanh, who said something that I remember as ďthe raft is not the shore.Ē That too often we confuse the raft, or the tool, with the shore we are trying to reach, or the goal. In the case of theology, a religion is the raft we use to try to reach the shore, or heaven/salvation/nirvana/etc. To me, it seems better to acknowledge but respect the different rafts we may be riding on the sea of life on, but is it not better to travel together to the same goal than it is to try to sink each otherís rafts because they look a little different than ours?

    There are plenty of Christians that are better Buddhists or Hindus than many Buddhists or Hindus, and many Buddhists or Hindus that are better Christians than Christians. Gandhi talked about this a lot.

    When you distill it down to the most essential and core beliefs and goals, many things really arenít all that different. I can get into a lot more detail, but Iíve already typed a lot haha. Regardless of what you believe in, having some belief is good, I agree. Whether itís Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc., they all have real value and help give us insight into God IMO. For example, many goals of Buddhism, Christianity, and Hinduism are all very similar, with similar goals of freeing ourselves from worldly temptations, returning to our original nature, putting others first, etc. Even Plato, the Stoics, etc have a lot of similar beliefs and goals, just different explanations and means for achieving them.

    Have you heard the parable of the blind men and the elephant?
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  7. Not really self improvement as it is motivational/inspirational

    "If life is a game these are the rules"

    Good book

  8. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Did you also see my two copies of the Bible, the Nag Hammadi scriptures, and Yogananda’s commentary on the Gospel?

    I don’t think I’m your traditional Christian though, as I can’t say I think that being a Christian is the only way to get to heaven or salvation or whatever you want to call it. One of the best analogies I’ve heard comes from the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who also talks about Jesus, Thich Nhat Hanh, who said something that I remember as “the raft is not the shore.” That too often we confuse the raft, or the tool, with the shore we are trying to reach, or the goal. In the case of theology, a religion is the raft we use to try to reach the shore, or heaven/salvation/nirvana/etc. To me, it seems better to acknowledge but respect the different rafts we may be riding on the sea of life on, but is it not better to travel together to the same goal than it is to try to sink each other’s rafts because they look a little different than ours?

    There are plenty of Christians that are better Buddhists or Hindus than many Buddhists or Hindus, and many Buddhists or Hindus that are better Christians than Christians. Gandhi talked about this a lot.

    When you distill it down to the most essential and core beliefs and goals, many things really aren’t all that different. I can get into a lot more detail, but I’ve already typed a lot haha. Regardless of what you believe in, having some belief is good, I agree. Whether it’s Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc., they all have real value and help give us insight into God IMO. For example, many goals of Buddhism, Christianity, and Hinduism are all very similar, with similar goals of freeing ourselves from worldly temptations, returning to our original nature, putting others first, etc. Even Plato, the Stoics, etc have a lot of similar beliefs and goals, just different explanations and means for achieving them.

    Have you heard the parable of the blind men and the elephant?


    I believe otherwise, to be honest with you... I guess you can say that I am too traditional, and you'd be correct. I believe in the literal 6-day creation of the world. I'm not the kind of liberal Christian who accepts old-earth creationism as truth.

    I believe, very genuinely, that Jesus is the only way to salvation. I've dabbled in Buddhism before and I didn't like it.

    Do you happen to know about Ravi Zacharias? I believe him when he said that religions are "fundamentally different and AT BEST superficially similar."

    But as much as I am a devoted Christian, I don't go to church, which is something I'm ashamed of a little bit. But it's no big deal for me. After all, God is with us ALL even if we don't go to church. It's probably better if we go to church, but it's not as important as what a lot of people make it out to be. We are all sinners and Christianity has a sort of egalitarianism in accusing virtually EVERYONE of being unworthy. Thankfully, because Jesus paid the price for our sins, we can all be saved.

    Interesting note... A part of the reason why Gandhi succeeded was because he appealed to a Christianized demographic.

    Anyway, I've never heard of that elephant parable. Please enlighten me.
  9. Self Improvement Books


    Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    I believe otherwise, to be honest with you... I guess you can say that I am too traditional, and you'd be correct. I believe in the literal 6-day creation of the world. I'm not the kind of liberal Christian who accepts old-earth creationism as truth.
    I respect your belief, but even many Christian scholars believe that some parts of the Bible are not intended taken literally. Also, what would you say if Genesis never actually said that the Serpent was Satan? Not saying it wasnít meant to represent him, just that many things arenít quite as cut and dry as youíd believe or are told.

    I believe, very genuinely, that Jesus is the only way to salvation. I've dabbled in Buddhism before and I didn't like it.
    Different strokes for different folks. Some Buddhism is very abstract and difficult to follow, some isnít. I approached Buddhism through the lens of Christianity, and learned a lot about both, and now I can honestly see how/why I do think Buddhism can genuinely work for some people and lead to the same ďshoreĒ or goal as Christianity. Just my opinion, and none of us, not you nor I, can know for sure.

    Do you happen to know about Ravi Zacharias? I believe him when he said that religions are "fundamentally different and AT BEST superficially similar."
    I never said that they are the same, only that the GOAL can be the same. Even the Dali Lama says you canít be a Buddhist and a Christian, but we can certainly apply lessons and ideas from one, and we donít have to inherently say that everything else is wrong. The belief systems and practices can differ wildly but have the same end goal, even if they think itís not the same goal. As I asked before, have you heard of the parable of the elephant and the blind men?

    But as much as I am a devoted Christian, I don't go to church, which is something I'm ashamed of a little bit. But it's no big deal for me. After all, God is with us ALL even if we don't go to church. It's probably better if we go to church, but it's not as important as what a lot of people make it out to be. We are all sinners and Christianity has a sort of egalitarianism in accusing virtually EVERYONE of being unworthy. Thankfully, because Jesus paid the price for our sins, we can all be saved.
    Random fact, did you know that Hindus have a term called ďtwice born,Ē which is a spiritual birth that is necessary to reach salvation and be free from the cycle of birth and death. Pretty interesting stuff. Also, like Christians, Hindus believe that man was created good, but was tempted and corrupted by the worldly things, and that we should strive to free ourselves from these things if we want salvation and to return to our true nature we were created in. Plato actually had a VERY similar belief too.

    Interesting note... A part of the reason why Gandhi succeeded was because he appealed to a Christianized demographic.
    Gandhi himself said he didnít feel a need to be a Christian because he though being a good Hindu meant being a good Christian. If anything, he would likely agree more with the ďthe raft is not the shoreĒ belief I mentioned earlier.

    Anyway, I've never heard of that elephant parable. Please enlighten me.
    Response in post above (bold).

    Adding the elephant parable soon.

    Anyway, I respect your views and beliefs. I donít know if Iím right, but I canít know, so the Stoic thing to do is not to worry about it, and just base my views and actions on what I believe, while staying open to new evidence or ideas that may come my way. As Epictetus said, paraphrased, we think that being strong in our convictions is always a good thing, but this is only true when our beliefs are based on solid reasoning and facts. Sticking to a belief once we know it to be wrong may be strength, but it is the strength of a madman, not a healthy man, and should not be praised or encouraged. Not saying youíre doing this at all, just that I try to keep an open mind and try to base my views on what I best think is the truth, not what sounds nicest to me or what Iíve believed for the longest.

    If my mind is made up and NOTHING, no amount of evidence or definitive proof could change it, then Iím not really interested in knowing the truth, and Iím not sure what methods God plans to use to help show me the truth, as I donít know the whole truth now, so I try not to shut myself off from anything that doesnít perfectly align with my current beliefs. If I did that, Iíd never learn anything new, and I wouldnít grow.
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  10. Parable of the elephant and the blind men (long):

    Long ago six old men lived in a village in India. Each was born blind. The other villagers loved the old men and kept them away from harm. Since the blind men could not see the world for themselves, they had to imagine many of its wonders. They listened carefully to the stories told by travelers to learn what they could about life outside the village.

    The men were curious about many of the stories they heard, but they were most curious about elephants. They were told that elephants could trample forests, carry huge burdens, and frighten young and old with their loud trumpet calls. But they also knew that the Rajah's daughter rode an elephant when she traveled in her father's kingdom. Would the Rajah let his daughter get near such a dangerous creature?

    The old men argued day and night about elephants. "An elephant must be a powerful giant," claimed the first blind man. He had heard stories about elephants being used to clear forests and build roads.

    "No, you must be wrong," argued the second blind man. "An elephant must be graceful and gentle if a princess is to ride on its back."

    "You're wrong! I have heard that an elephant can pierce a man's heart with its terrible horn," said the third blind man.

    "Please," said the fourth blind man. "You are all mistaken. An elephant is nothing more than a large sort of cow. You know how people exaggerate."

    "I am sure that an elephant is something magical," said the fifth blind man. "That would explain why the Rajah's daughter can travel safely throughout the kingdom."

    "I don't believe elephants exist at all," declared the sixth blind man. "I think we are the victims of a cruel joke."

    Finally, the villagers grew tired of all the arguments, and they arranged for the curious men to visit the palace of the Rajah to learn the truth about elephants. A young boy from their village was selected to guide the blind men on their journey. The smallest man put his hand on the boy's shoulder. The second blind man put his hand on his friend's shoulder, and so on until all six men were ready to walk safely behind the boy who would lead them to the Rajah's magnificent palace.

    When the blind men reached the palace, they were greeted by an old friend from their village who worked as a gardener on the palace grounds. Their friend led them to the courtyard. There stood an elephant. The blind men stepped forward to touch the creature that was the subject of so many arguments.

    The first blind man reached out and touched the side of the huge animal. "An elephant is smooth and solid like a wall!" he declared. "It must be very powerful."

    The second blind man put his hand on the elephant's limber trunk. "An elephant is like a giant snake," he announced.

    The third blind man felt the elephant's pointed tusk. "I was right," he decided. "This creature is as sharp and deadly as a spear."

    The fourth blind man touched one of the elephant's four legs. "What we have here," he said, "is an extremely large cow."

    The fifth blind man felt the elephant's giant ear. "I believe an elephant is like a huge fan or maybe a magic carpet that can fly over mountains and treetops," he said.

    The sixth blind man gave a tug on the elephant's coarse tail. "Why, this is nothing more than a piece of old rope. Dangerous, indeed," he scoffed.

    The gardener led his friends to the shade of a tree. "Sit here and rest for the long journey home," he said. "I will bring you some water to drink."

    While they waited, the six blind men talked about the elephant.

    "An elephant is like a wall," said the first blind man. "Surely we can finally agree on that."

    "A wall? An elephant is a giant snake!" answered the second blind man.

    "It's a spear, I tell you," insisted the third blind man.

    "I'm certain it's a giant cow," said the fourth blind man.

    "Magic carpet. There's no doubt," said the fifth blind man.

    "Don't you see?" pleaded the sixth blind man. "Someone used a rope to trick us."

    Their argument continued and their shouts grew louder and louder.

    "Wall!" "Snake!" "Spear!" "Cow!" "Carpet!" "Rope!"

    "Stop shouting!" called a very angry voice.

    It was the Rajah, awakened from his nap by the noisy argument.

    "How can each of you be so certain you are right?" asked the ruler.

    The six blind men considered the question. And then, knowing the Rajah to be a very wise man, they decided to say nothing at all.

    "The elephant is a very large animal," said the Rajah kindly. "Each man touched only one part. Perhaps if you put the parts together, you will see the truth. Now, let me finish my nap in peace."

    When their friend returned to the garden with the cool water, the six men rested quietly in the shade, thinking about the Rajah's advice.

    "He is right," said the first blind man. "To learn the truth, we must put all the parts together. Let's discuss this on the journey home."

    The first blind man put his hand on the shoulder of the young boy who would guide them home. The second blind man put a hand on his friend's shoulder, and so on until all six men were ready to travel together
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  11. I also think that we can learn a great deal from religious teachings even if we chose not to believe in the religions. I think too many people shut themselves off to reading anything ďreligiousĒ because they donít want to have to believe in the more abstract or out there theological things.

    Honestly, anyone can learn from the teachings of Jesus or the Buddha and apply them without having to believe in their religions, or even in religion at all. Brother Laurence once said something to the effect of he sometimes wished he could do good things for God without Him seeing it and rewarding it, to do it just to do it. Buddhists also say that we have to not only do the right things, but do them for the right reasons. Itís similar to Epictetus and the Stoics saying that we should do good deeds and be done with it, not to expect something in return or to desire to be viewed as good for doing it. Surely we can all learn from these things and apply them, and that we can all say itís good to do good and expect nothing in return, but merely to do good because it is the right thing to do, itís our true nature to be good, and that will bring us true happiness. My understanding of it is that Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Plato, and the Stoics all believe that man was created good by nature, but that itís temptation and worldly pleasures that corrupt us. And that we should therefore strive to fee ourselves from these things that have power over us. Iíve heard Christians say that people are slaves to sin; the Stoics said that we are slaves to whatever we depend on for pleasure. In both cases, we should strive to free ourselves from these things. Plato described these things, these sins or temptations, as nails that bind our soul to our body, and they are strong enough to make us desire to come back again (reincarnation) to satisfy them. Only by removing these nails can we no longer desire to be reborn again, and only then can we go to be with God. The whole ďsin as nailsĒ thing resonates pretty well with the whole Jesus dying on the cross for man, no? And he was around hundreds of years BC. The Hindu concept of reincarnation is pretty similar to Platoís actually. Thereís also Jesus saying he is the way. Interestingly, in the Tao Te Ching, written hundreds of years BC, Lao Tzu speaks of something that has always been, that never changes, that created the universe. He says he doesnít know what to call it, so he calls it the way.

    TL;DR: even if Christians, Buddhists, Hindus, Plato, etc. all have different ideas of what happens after we die, or why we should seek God, they all seek God, and they all seek to go beyond worldly things, earthly pleasures, sin and temptation. They seek to return to the good nature that we were all created with. Anyone who sincerely strives to do this is someone I can respect, and someone who is striving to be Christ-like, even if theyíre not a ďChristian.Ē
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  12. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    Repped since you asked, and because it's a solid post haha

    I'll check them out. I enjoy reading a wide variety of books, so I'm interested in books to pull together multiple beliefs/philosophies/etc in a way that makes sense (some books do it amazingly well, and some are clearly trying to shove a round peg in a square hole). I'll try to take a picture of some of the books I have. As Ron Burgundy once said, "I have many leather-bound books," but I don't have an apartment that smells of rich mahogany.
    Very nice collection! It's been a long time since I've read the Upanishads. I'm going to have to work that back into my daily routine.
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  13. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    I also think that we can learn a great deal from religious teachings even if we chose not to believe in the religions. I think too many people shut themselves off to reading anything “religious” because they don’t want to have to believe in the more abstract or out there theological things.

    Honestly, anyone can learn from the teachings of Jesus or the Buddha and apply them without having to believe in their religions, or even in religion at all. Brother Laurence once said something to the effect of he sometimes wished he could do good things for God without Him seeing it and rewarding it, to do it just to do it. Buddhists also say that we have to not only do the right things, but do them for the right reasons. It’s similar to Epictetus and the Stoics saying that we should do good deeds and be done with it, not to expect something in return or to desire to be viewed as good for doing it. Surely we can all learn from these things and apply them, and that we can all say it’s good to do good and expect nothing in return, but merely to do good because it is the right thing to do, it’s our true nature to be good, and that will bring us true happiness. My understanding of it is that Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Plato, and the Stoics all believe that man was created good by nature, but that it’s temptation and worldly pleasures that corrupt us. And that we should therefore strive to fee ourselves from these things that have power over us. I’ve heard Christians say that people are slaves to sin; the Stoics said that we are slaves to whatever we depend on for pleasure. In both cases, we should strive to free ourselves from these things. Plato described these things, these sins or temptations, as nails that bind our soul to our body, and they are strong enough to make us desire to come back again (reincarnation) to satisfy them. Only by removing these nails can we no longer desire to be reborn again, and only then can we go to be with God. The whole “sin as nails” thing resonates pretty well with the whole Jesus dying on the cross for man, no? And he was around hundreds of years BC. The Hindu concept of reincarnation is pretty similar to Plato’s actually. There’s also Jesus saying he is the way. Interestingly, in the Tao Te Ching, written hundreds of years BC, Lao Tzu speaks of something that has always been, that never changes, that created the universe. He says he doesn’t know what to call it, so he calls it the way.

    TL;DR: even if Christians, Buddhists, Hindus, Plato, etc. all have different ideas of what happens after we die, or why we should seek God, they all seek God, and they all seek to go beyond worldly things, earthly pleasures, sin and temptation. They seek to return to the good nature that we were all created with. Anyone who sincerely strives to do this is someone I can respect, and someone who is striving to be Christ-like, even if they’re not a “Christian.”


    I'm impressed by your knowledge, to be honest.

    I don't know what else to say except thanks for sharing. lol

    Actually, when you mentioned that we can all learn from Jesus's and Buddha's teachings, it reminded me of one particular teaching of Jesus during his sermon on the mount. I have it memorized. Here it is...

    Matthew 6:31-34

    Therefore, do not be anxious saying "What shall we eat?" or "What shall we drink?" or "What shall we wear?" For the gentiles seek after all these things and your heavenly father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. Therefore, do not be anxious about tomorrow for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is it's own trouble.


    I absolutely loved the sermon on the mount. It's been a long time since I read it, but I remember it being very enlightening and profound.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    I'm impressed by your knowledge, to be honest.

    I don't know what else to say except thanks for sharing. lol

    Actually, when you mentioned that we can all learn from Jesus's and Buddha's teachings, it reminded me of one particular teaching of Jesus during his sermon on the mount. I have it memorized. Here it is...

    Matthew 6:31-34

    Therefore, do not be anxious saying "What shall we eat?" or "What shall we drink?" or "What shall we wear?" For the gentiles seek after all these things and your heavenly father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. Therefore, do not be anxious about tomorrow for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is it's own trouble.


    I absolutely loved the sermon on the mount. It's been a long time since I read it, but I remember it being very enlightening and profound.
    That's the stuff.

    Basically a complete account of alien encounters with humans.

    Fully believe prayer can unlock parts of the brain that are dormant.

  15. Quote Originally Posted by Cgkone View Post
    That's the stuff.

    Basically a complete account of alien encounters with humans.

    Fully believe prayer can unlock parts of the brain that are dormant.
    Wait, what? What are you talking about? I'm confused.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    Wait, what? What are you talking about? I'm confused.
    I'm referring to most of the accounts in the bible where man spoke to God.
    Sorry not specifically the sermon on the mount( which is really good)
    The entire bible is basically an alien encounter.

  17. Sorry if that's a little too out there.

  18. Quote Originally Posted by Cgkone View Post
    I'm referring to most of the accounts in the bible where man spoke to God.
    Sorry not specifically the sermon on the mount( which is really good)
    The entire bible is basically an alien encounter.
    Yes. I'm definitely not ruling out that possibility.

    The one problem I have with that theory, though, is that it weakens the idea of God being all-powerful. If he is merely an extraterrestrial, it would mean he would be subject to natural, scientific laws. But the God of the Bible is more than just another superior creature. He's more than that. And that's what I believe.

  19. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    Yes. I'm definitely not ruling out that possibility.

    The one problem I have with that theory, though, is that it weakens the idea of God being all-powerful. If he is merely an extraterrestrial, it would mean he would be subject to natural, scientific laws. But the God of the Bible is more than just another superior creature. He's more than that. And that's what I believe.
    Aliens could just be an extension of God.
    Messengers
    God himself never actually walks around on earth just through Jesus.
    Its always just a voice or a messenger of God.

  20. So absolutely God could be the creater of earth and man and love us and send prophets and instructions on how to live and still not be a giant man sitting on a gold thrown on a cloud.

    I fully believe in God.
    Just when it was copied by king James we were so primitive that
    It made more sense to believe in angels with wing than angels traveling light speed.

    You ever look into the book of Enoch?

  21. Quote Originally Posted by Cgkone View Post
    You ever look into the book of Enoch?
    No I haven't. What's it about?

  22. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    No I haven't. What's it about?
    When God cast Satan out of heaven many angels went with him.
    They had sex with men and women and animals
    The of spring were powerful creatures.

    King James kept it out when he copied the bible.

    Look it up very interesting.
    It was in the original scrolls that were used to write the bible.
    Or something like that.

  23. Quote Originally Posted by Cgkone View Post
    I'm referring to most of the accounts in the bible where man spoke to God.
    Sorry not specifically the sermon on the mount( which is really good)
    The entire bible is basically an alien encounter.
    An alien encounter is not the most plausible or logical explanation for the events of the Bible. For one, itís arguable that not everything is intended to be taken literally at face value. Iím not saying itís impossible, just that Occamís would suggest that they theory with the least amount of assumptions is probably correct, and throwing aliens into the mix, as something we canít really prove right now, on top of divine intervention and the presence of God, which we may never be able to ďproveĒ seems less likely than ďnormalĒ divine intervention, as an Omnipotent/Omnipresent God is necessary in either case; also having aliens would be another step or assumption that we just donít know, which makes it less likely IMO. Not impossible, just not likely. If God is omniscient and omnipresent, the simplest explanation is he can just send manifestations and/or communicate directly with people without a physical form/presence. Having God communicate through aliens is another added layer of complexity that further convolutes things IMO. What do these aliens do when theyíre not communicating with us? Do they always do Godís will, or just sometimes? Etc. Iím not saying aliens donít exist, as given infinite time and space, they almost certainly do, or did, or will exist, itís just I donít know if theyíre messengers of God.

    TL;DR; We havenít ďprovenĒ the existence of aliens or God; Iíd be wary of saying that theyíre so closely linked and interdependent.
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  24. Quote Originally Posted by Zombocalypse View Post
    I'm impressed by your knowledge, to be honest.

    I don't know what else to say except thanks for sharing. lol

    Actually, when you mentioned that we can all learn from Jesus's and Buddha's teachings, it reminded me of one particular teaching of Jesus during his sermon on the mount. I have it memorized. Here it is...

    Matthew 6:31-34

    Therefore, do not be anxious saying "What shall we eat?" or "What shall we drink?" or "What shall we wear?" For the gentiles seek after all these things and your heavenly father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. Therefore, do not be anxious about tomorrow for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is it's own trouble.


    I absolutely loved the sermon on the mount. It's been a long time since I read it, but I remember it being very enlightening and profound.
    Thanks man. The sermon on the mount is definitely amazing, for anyone, Christian or not. The call to not worry is very Stoic, and the call to be mindful of the present moment is very reminiscent of Buddhism. Perhaps thatís just because itís the truth, and different beliefs have different parts of the truth that Jesus was teaching. Itís all very interesting, and reading different views and beliefs has furthered my understanding of each one. IMO, they can work together, but it does help to have some ďbaseĒ or ďlensĒ to come back to.
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