Self Myofascial Release (smfr)

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    Self Myofascial Release (smfr)


    SELF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE


    My personal stash of recovery goodness.
    1 - AXIS Foam Roller (12")
    1 - AXIS Foam Roller (12", cut in half)
    1 - Tennis Ball

    Looking to save some money? Use a rolling pin and a tennis ball. This requires a friend for your dorsal half.



    I need to formally thank PMiller for opening my eyes to SMFR work. I wanted to post some links for the folks that are not incorporating it into their training/life.

    Myofascial Release is a form of bodywork (complementary medicine) which includes, but is not limited to structural assessments (where a formal diagnosis is not necessarily given) and manual massage techniques for stretching the fascia and releasing bonds between fascia, integument, muscles, and bones are mainly applied; with the goal of eliminating pain, increasing range of motion and balancing the body.
    YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.

    Must See Links

    Wikipedia | Online Encyclopedia

    T-Nation.com | Feel better for Ten Bucks

    Elite Fitness Systems | Rehab Tools

    Sports Fitness Advisor| SMFR Exercises

    Coach Nick Tumminello | Hamstring Flexibility Secrect w/ SMFR Video

    Coach Nick Tumminello | Secrets of Self Myofascial Release DVD

    Self-Myofascial Release Techniques | Micheal Clark, MS,PT,PES,CSCS

    Elite Fitness Systems | Rehabilitation Exercise Index

    -

    They do it; why don't you?
    Last edited by borobulker; 07-07-2008 at 11:15 AM.
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    Glad to see your enjoying it buddy, it really is amazing how much relief you can get from a piece of foam. I am about to start trying other recovery methods such as Epsom Salts baths and see how that goes.
    Muscle Pharm Rep
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    Excellent info, man. I've had active release work done before and it works wonders. This looks like a great option and is a lot cheaper to boot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhyno View Post
    Excellent info, man. I've had active release work done before and it works wonders. This looks like a great option and is a lot cheaper to boot.

    I am thinking of compiling some more info on ART also and posting something like this...

    thanks!
    \\ USPlabs Alpha Ginger //
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    Hey guys is there any way to use these techniqes for the calf muscles (all by your self)?

    Mr.50
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    http://asp.elitefts.com/qa/default.a...=58185&tid=115

    Foam Roller - Calves
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Foam Rolling is a great rehab tool for all parts of the body. It can soften muscle adhesions leading to a faster recovery.

    To foam roll the calves, place the foam roller directly under the calf muscle. Roll back and forth 10-20 times. Be sure to concentrate on any "sticky" points. For more pressure, you can cross your other leg over the top (as pictured). Turning your foot in and out will make sure you hit all areas of the gastroc. You can do both legs and once, but doing each leg separately provides more pressure on that leg.

    Click here to get your foam roller!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.50 View Post
    Hey guys is there any way to use these techniqes for the calf muscles (all by your self)?

    Mr.50
    For calfs, i use the tennis ball. OR you can have a friend (my girlfriend does it) use a rolling pin.

    Good luck!
    \\ USPlabs Alpha Ginger //
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    Foam rollers are the new craze. For those of you that haven't had the luxury of working with one of these pieces of equipment, a foam roller is a 6 inch thick piece of cylindrical foam, typically either 1 foot or 3 feet in length. The densities of foam rollers vary. Some are very malleable (and probably only suited for the elderly or someone that is extremely sensitive), while others are much more stiff. In most cases, I think the stiffer type are much better. In fact, I sometimes use a 4 inch thick, 3 foot long piece of PVC piping to do my foam rolling work.

    So why the foam rolling emphasis recently? It's come to our attention that, in general, we spend a lot of time improving tissue length (think stretching), and NO time on tissue QUALITY. As a simple illustration, let's consider a muscle as a long rubber band. Many people have had the experience of having a “knot” in their muscle, or an extremely tender or hypersensitive area. Think of tying a knot in the middle of our rubber band. Now if you go to stretch that rubber band, envision that it will take more absolute force to attain the same overall change in length and also that the areas immediately adjacent to the knot will become thinner and superfluously stretched. While this isn't EXACTLY how things work in the body, it will work as a metaphor for our purposes.

    Foam rolling has been likened to a form of soft tissue therapy, similar to various forms of massage, Active Release Techniques (A.R.T.), etc. While I can appreciate the usefulness of foam rolling, and recommend that all my clients/athletes do it immediately before they train (and throughout the day if they're willing), I think it's important to keep everything in perspective. Foam rolling is not the cure for cancer, as the industry push seems to insinuate. Averaging around $25, a foam roller is essentially the world's cheapest massage therapist. But you get what you pay for. An actual manual therapist will out-perform a foam roller EVERY time (assuming they therapist has any clue about what they're doing).

    I've been fortunate to have had the experience of getting A.R.T. work done by Dr. William Brady in Boston over the last few weeks. While Dr. Brady is a chiropractic physician, A.R.T. therapist, and certified strength and conditioning specialist, I liken his work to that of a magician. A typical visit lasts about 5 minutes, 2 of which consist of answering questions and testing range of motion (ROM). Do the math, only THREE minutes of actually work. I leave every single session with DRASTIC ROM improvements, and feeling much better. This isn't an advertisement for Dr. Brady (although, if you're within an hour of Boston, I HIGHLY recommend that you look him up. Tell him Kevin sent you); it's just an illustration of the difference between the results attainable from foam rolling accompanied by stretching, and the results attainable from a skilled soft-tissue therapist. You'll getter better results, in terms of ROM AND health, in a few A.R.T. session than you would from hun
    dreds of hours of foam rolling and stretching.

    So why still recommend foam rolling? Well, quite simply, not everyone has access to a soft-tissue therapist. Ideally, I'd have every athlete I work with seeing an A.R.T. and massage therapist regularly (at least one of them, at least every two weeks). The busy schedules of modern society often don't permit for such a commitment. Foam rolling is a cheap, yet still effective compromise.

    If you're interested in beginning to foam roll, I can tell you that you will feel much better after a week or so of doing it consistently. I've tried a lot of the foam rollers on the market and can only recommend two: the three foot black one from Perform Better (www.PerformBetter.com), and a three foot piece of PVC piping from anywhere (Home Depot is probably a good bet). While you're out, pick up a lacrosse ball too. You can use a lacrosse ball to apply a more concentrated, focal pressure on smaller tissue that won't respond to the more global pushing of a foam roller.

    Once you're equipped, go to youtube.com and search prodigyperformance. I've been busy over the last few weeks adding a ton of video. I probably won't add it to the Prodigy website for several more weeks so youtube is your best bet. As always, feel free to email me if you have any questions (kn@prodigyperformancetraining .com).

    Keep training hard,

    Kevin Neeld, C.S.C.S.
    www.ProdigyPerformanceTraining.com
    www.KevinNeeld.com
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    Mr. 50 - I'd go r-e-a-l s-l-o-w w/ rolling the calves (and the ilio-tibial band, down the outside of the thigh) - these areas are THICK w/ pain receptors, and rolling 'em can be *quite* sharply uncomfortable until you get the knack of controlling speed, pressure and breathing.

    That said, SMR is a great addition to the toolkit - worth everyone's attention.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BodyWizard View Post
    Mr. 50 - I'd go r-e-a-l s-l-o-w w/ rolling the calves (and the ilio-tibial band, down the outside of the thigh) - these areas are THICK w/ pain receptors, and rolling 'em can be *quite* sharply uncomfortable until you get the knack of controlling speed, pressure and breathing.

    That said, SMR is a great addition to the toolkit - worth everyone's attention.

    He he.... I sure did find that out BodyWizard..... especially soreness the next day too! Thanks for the warning. I am actually at the point now where it doesn't hurt so much

    Mr.50
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    i need to do this again i used it made me almost cry hah that just goes to show howmuch i need it

    my hip erectors area are the tightest in my body
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycste View Post
    BUMP

    i need to do this again i used it made me almost cry hah that just goes to show howmuch i need it

    my hip erectors area are the tightest in my body
    Same here man... Unreal tight. I just ordered a new, full size roller from EliteFTS...
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    Great thread. I used the foam rollers often..they are awesome. Can't seem to keep a flippin tennis ball around with my rotty destroying them and my 2 yo daughter hiding them, lol.
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    Foam rolling is an absolute life saver, superb thread borobulker

    I quite like a rolling pin taken to the quads, the pain is excruciating initially but after a few sessions it feels great

    Anyone hardcore enough to use a golf ball?
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    on elitefts, you guys think its worth spending a few bucks more and getting their "greenish" colored ones that are the strongest material etc?
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    Definately. They last a lot longer as the dense foam is less likely to get deformed with time. May hurt a bit more than the softer ones but it's worth it imo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhyno View Post
    Definately. They last a lot longer as the dense foam is less likely to get deformed with time. May hurt a bit more than the softer ones but it's worth it imo.
    yea makes sense, i def hope i push myself into ordering the 2 rollers and doing the exercises
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    I think it's smart to use both - the less dense foam is def less traumatic to the more exquisitely painful areas, and advisable relaxing through this is the key: simply hammering through is NOT going to get you the long-term results. Following with the more dense is a good sequence, and since the rollers aren't that expensive (check Amazon, or PerformBetter.com), there's no reason not to use both.

    Good to see SMR getting some love!
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmiller383 View Post
    Glad to see your enjoying it buddy, it really is amazing how much relief you can get from a piece of foam. I am about to start trying other recovery methods such as Epsom Salts baths and see how that goes.
    Epsom salts immersion was something my parents were both big on back in the 50s - they were both extremely active up into their late 70s & rarely complained of aches & such (and as I approach 60, I'm appreciating the value).

    Will have to look into the science of it - should be interesting!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BodyWizard View Post
    Epsom salts immersion was something my parents were both big on back in the 50s - they were both extremely active up into their late 70s & rarely complained of aches & such (and as I approach 60, I'm appreciating the value).

    Will have to look into the science of it - should be interesting!
    My chiro talked me into it for the first time a few weeks ago. I could literally crack my whole back while laying in the tub. Something I can never do in any condition.

    I may take one tomorrow. Post up any info you get please.

    Also, got my new 3' foam roller in today from EFS, same material. My GF and I spent about 25 minutes earlier sword fighting with my foam rollers...
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    Quote Originally Posted by UKStrength View Post
    Anyone hardcore enough to use a golf ball?
    Many people use lacrosse balls... ouch.
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