Leaning to the left too much

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  1. Leaning to the left too much


    I'm having trouble with my posture. I unconsciously lean to the left too much and it's putting too much stress on my left foot.

    I would notice it during jogging or just sitting down. I always pull myself upright but then I'd find myself leaning again to the left side.

    I can't seem to find anything on the net about it and I'm still searching for info while I wait for my appointment to an ortho doctor.


  2. (Not a joke). Is one leg longer? Have a buddy who was having posture issues and after he went to the doc, they found his legs were WAAAY off, and it was messing his hips up. He has custom shoes to fix it with 1" sole extensions on one side. Looks silly, but only because I know about it
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  3. Any back and/or hip issues?
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  4. You may have a point. I don't know how to measure my legs accurately so i guess I'll have to wait for my appointment.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    Any back and/or hip issues?
    I notice my shoulders aren't symmetrical. I had an injury when I was a baby according to my mom. I fell down from my crib and broke my clavicle.
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by maxram View Post
    I notice my shoulders aren't symmetrical. I had an injury when I was a baby according to my mom. I fell down from my crib and broke my clavicle.
    That could be part of the problem. No current pain/tightness in your lower back, though?
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  7. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    That could be part of the problem. No current pain/tightness in your lower back, though?
    None right now. Only a sore left heel.

    I've had chest xrays before and my spine is normal. This sore left foot started when I got more active this past few months. More active compared to my teenage years.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by Wrivest View Post
    (Not a joke). Is one leg longer? Have a buddy who was having posture issues and after he went to the doc, they found his legs were WAAAY off, and it was messing his hips up. He has custom shoes to fix it with 1" sole extensions on one side. Looks silly, but only because I know about it
    Yeah my little brother had the same thing, left leg is longer and it messed up his back during track season because of the turns.

  9. the back is a strange and funny critter it will shift on its own to relieve pressure on a nerve. if your not having pain and odd sensations down the leg burning, or cold and weakness you can rule out disk compression on the transverse nerves( the nerves that run out of the spinal space and to the limb) if you have had x-rays of the back and there is no scoliosis(abnormal curves of the spinal bones) that MAY eliminate this as well. it sounds like a posture issue or as some above me said a small difference in length between the right and left leg. get it checked out by your primary care and he may recommend a good ortho

  10. Well i did have 3-4 days where my left calf was numb almost painful on the outer side.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by maxram View Post
    Well i did have 3-4 days where my left calf was numb almost painful on the outer side.
    You would know if it was from something like a ruptured disk, you wouldn't say well i had an odd sensation for a couple days LOL. my last disk injury i couldn't lift my left foot and the pain was massive all the time. I would check with the primary care doc and explain what you have noticed.

  12. If you haven't already, get an MRI done, just to be certain.

  13. Ok thanks for the replies guys.

    I did have one incident when I was 20, I had a very intense lower back pain that I bad trouble getting up from bed. It disappeared after 3 days.

    Then last year, I was napping in the ER during break by sitting down with my head leaning forward on a table. That's when my left outer calf started numbing.

    My appointment got moved due to an OR sched of the ortho doctor.

  14. An Ortho is your best bet. Should be able to figure it out. I need to visit one myself soon.

  15. If it's just your feet it could be your wear to small of shoes, i had major foot issues about 2 years ago to the point were I almost couldn't walk when I woke up in the morning. Tried everything from rolling ball on my foot to chiropractor. None of it helped then finally I went to get a new pair of shoes and got my feet professionally measured I was wearing shoes 2 1/2 sizes to small within a week the pain went away. It was pretty silly and stupid but sometimes we overlooks the simplest things.
    Bigcountry's Getting a little smaller: Epi/Stano Log

    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/cycle-info/231194-bigcountrys-getting-little.html

  16. Quote Originally Posted by Bigcountry08 View Post
    If it's just your feet it could be your wear to small of shoes, i had major foot issues about 2 years ago to the point were I almost couldn't walk when I woke up in the morning. Tried everything from rolling ball on my foot to chiropractor. None of it helped then finally I went to get a new pair of shoes and got my feet professionally measured I was wearing shoes 2 1/2 sizes to small within a week the pain went away. It was pretty silly and stupid but sometimes we overlooks the simplest things.
    Unfortunately we don't have podiatrists here

  17. Quote Originally Posted by maxram View Post
    I notice my shoulders aren't symmetrical. I had an injury when I was a baby according to my mom. I fell down from my crib and broke my clavicle.

    Most people's shoulders are not symmetrical in height, the dominant side is typically lower. I'd worry more about spinal alignment and pelvis orientation

  18. Quote Originally Posted by maxram View Post
    Ok thanks for the replies guys.

    I did have one incident when I was 20, I had a very intense lower back pain that I bad trouble getting up from bed. It disappeared after 3 days.

    Then last year, I was napping in the ER during break by sitting down with my head leaning forward on a table. That's when my left outer calf started numbing.

    My appointment got moved due to an OR sched of the ortho doctor.

    Those are all signs of a disc issue, the second resulting in compression on most likely the L5 nerve root

  19. Quote Originally Posted by Gutterpump View Post
    If you haven't already, get an MRI done, just to be certain.

    Honestly I would recommend against jumping to this conclusion at this point, I'd say see a professional and let them decide. MRI's of the back are often inconclusive. Do an MRI of a lifters back and your likely to see many small herniations etc. but often are not the source of pain

  20. Quote Originally Posted by braskibra View Post
    Honestly I would recommend against jumping to this conclusion at this point, I'd say see a professional and let them decide. MRI's of the back are often inconclusive. Do an MRI of a lifters back and your likely to see many small herniations etc. but often are not the source of pain
    ^^this is not true ^^

    minor herniation of a disk on a normal spine may not contact a nerve which is where the pain comes from but if said person has a narrowing of the spinal canal (Stenosis) which is common in most active males age 30+ a small herniation can be very uncomfortable.

    I don't think you have a spinal injury that happened from a trauma, but i have had my fair share of spinal injuries and an MRI will reveal all inconsistency and injuries. the majority of people will have a some sort of MINOR herniation where the disk presses on the outer casing but 7 times out of 10 reside in a few weeks with out you knowing it, the doctors especially the ones that practice in spinal injuries know this and tell you this. The other times the disk tears its nucleus sack in leaks the nuclei out into the spinal fluid area and there is where it calcifies and starts to cause pain. also the longer the sack is torn the faster the deterioration starts inside the disk (disk degeneration) once this occurs the likelihood of the disk to reside back to natural position becomes much less.

    sorry for the information rant but the back is something i have a fair amount of knowledge in. have have sat with many of specialist and discussed treatment for my injuries and conditions.

    As i said before in previous posts talk with your primary care doctor don't waste time with the ER unless your incontinent because they are useless and a waste of a 250 deductible. describe your pain to the pc and go from there

  21. Quote Originally Posted by hulkish1 View Post
    ^^this is not true ^^

    minor herniation of a disk on a normal spine may not contact a nerve which is where the pain comes from but if said person has a narrowing of the spinal canal (Stenosis) which is common in most active males age 30+ a small herniation can be very uncomfortable.

    I don't think you have a spinal injury that happened from a trauma, but i have had my fair share of spinal injuries and an MRI will reveal all inconsistency and injuries. the majority of people will have a some sort of MINOR herniation where the disk presses on the outer casing but 7 times out of 10 reside in a few weeks with out you knowing it, the doctors especially the ones that practice in spinal injuries know this and tell you this. The other times the disk tears its nucleus sack in leaks the nuclei out into the spinal fluid area and there is where it calcifies and starts to cause pain. also the longer the sack is torn the faster the deterioration starts inside the disk (disk degeneration) once this occurs the likelihood of the disk to reside back to natural position becomes much less.

    sorry for the information rant but the back is something i have a fair amount of knowledge in. have have sat with many of specialist and discussed treatment for my injuries and conditions.

    As i said before in previous posts talk with your primary care doctor don't waste time with the ER unless your incontinent because they are useless and a waste of a 250 deductible. describe your pain to the pc and go from there

    I am not sure what portion you are questioning.

    First and foremost:
    An MRI of the back is indicated if:
    1. Persons signs and symptoms present red flags, out of the ordinary symptoms
    2. If the person has severe loss of motor function or loss of sensation, cauda equina syndrome etc
    3. If the symptoms the person has warrants the possibility of surgery
    4. If MRI dictates treatment

    In OP's case, he complains of a curved spine. If by visual/physical examination it appears his spine is significantly curved then this would indicate an x-ray.
    Let the physician make the call, in my opinion his symptoms do not appear anywhere near the level that would indicate use of MRI. Additionally, it would not change his initial treatment plan which most likely would include either medication (anti-inflams) conservative care (PT) or bracing.

    Furthermore I would like to point out some erroneous statements:

    "minor herniation of a disk on a normal spine may not contact a nerve which is where the pain comes from but if said person has a narrowing of the spinal canal (Stenosis) which is common in most active males age 30+ a small herniation can be very uncomfortable. "

    prevalence of spinal stenosis is not very high

    "this cross-sectional study was performed as a part of the research on osteoarthritis/osteoporosis against disability (ROAD) in Japan and 1,009 subjects (335 men, 674 women, mean age 66.3 years, age range 21-97 years) were analyzed. An experienced orthopedic surgeon obtained the medical history and performed the physical testing for all participants. Symptomatic LSS diagnostic criteria required the presence of both symptoms and radiographic LSS findings. A 6-m walking time, chair standing time, and one-leg standing time were obtained from all participants.RESULTS:

    The prevalence of symptomatic LSS was 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.7-11.3) overall, 10.1% (CI: 7.4-13.8) in men and 8.9% (CI: 7.0-11.3) in women. There was a difference in the prevalence with increasing age by gender. The LSS prevalence showed little difference with age greater than 70 years for men, but the LSS prevalence for women was higher with increasing age. Among physical performance measures, 6-m walking time at a maximal pace was significantly associated with symptomatic LSS (P = 0.03).
    CONCLUSION:

    The prevalence of symptomatic LSS was approximately 10% in a cohort resembling the general Japanese population. "

    10% in people whom average an age of 66 years old

    In addition, even with presence of stenosis, most people are asymptomatic

    "We found that 77.9% of participants had more than moderate central stenosis and 30.4% had severe central stenosis. Logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and severity of radiographic LSS showed that severe central stenosis was related to clinical symptoms. However, only 17.5% of the participants with severe central stenosis were symptomatic.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although radiographic LSS was common in our cohort, which resembled the general Japanese population, symptomatic persons were
    relatively uncommon."

    Not to mention MRI's of the back

    "Given that many asymptomatic adults have abnormal findings on lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging, this modality generally should not be performed for nonspecific chronic low back pain in the absence of red flags. Whole body scanning is not supported by current evidence."

    Clinical guidelines


    [Indications for magnetic resonance imaging for low back pain in adults].

    [Article in Spanish]
    Millán Ortuondo E1, Cabrera Zubizarreta A2, Muñiz Saitua J3, Sola Sarabia C3, Zubia Arratibel J4.
    Author information


    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION:

    Low back pain is a common disorder that generates many medical consultations. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is commonly used in the clinical management of some of these patients. However, the cost of inappropriate MRI use is high, so there is a need to develop guidelines to help physicians make correct decisions and optimize available resources.
    OBJECTIVE:

    To determine the main clinical indications for MRI scanning in adults with low back pain.
    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used: After a systematic review (May 2012), a list of the clinical indications for MRI scanning in patients with low back pain was prepared. A multidisciplinary expert panel scored each indication from 1, «totally inappropriate» to 9, «totally appropriate». A first on-line round, an in-person panel meeting, where results of the first round were discussed, and a final second on-line round were arranged. A clinical indication was considered appropriate if the median score was 6.5 or higher, and there was agreement between experts (IPRAS index was used).
    RESULTS:

    An MRI test is considered appropriate if cancer, spinal infection or a fracture, even with a negative X-ray test is suspected.; if there is inflammatory back pain; severe/progressive neurological deficit; severe and progressive low back pain; subacute or chronic low back pain with radicular involvement unresponsive to conservative therapy.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    Clinical indications for a MRI scanning are based on the suspicion of a secondary serious pathology. This methodology helps to set clinical indications for MRI, and may be of great value for both clinicians and health managers.
    Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.



    "Eight studies were included in this review. Strata were defined for separate pathologies i.e. lumbar disc herniation (HNP) and spinal stenosis. Five studies comparing MRI to findings at the surgery for identifying HNP were included in a meta-analysis. Pooled analysis resulted in a summary estimate of sensitivity of 75% (95% CI 65-83%) and specificity of 77% (95% CI 61-88%). For spinal stenosis pooling was not possible.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    The results suggest that a considerable proportion of patients may be classified incorrectly by MRI for HNP and spinal stenosis. However, the evidence for the diagnostic accuracy of MRI found by this review is not conclusive, since the results could be distorted due to the limited number of studies and large heterogeneity."


  22. are you a doctor? have you had significant injuries to the spine?

    reason I ask i have spent the past 7yrs of my life learning why i have stenosis, degenerative disk disorder
    and i dont read spinal forums or websites since the last time i brought one to my surgeon he crumbled it up and laughed said these things are a joke.

    stenosis is very common more common then your study shows and it is very easily detected on an mri. if you read the last post i did i simply stated that the x-ray would only show curves which can also be seen in an MRI as well. if filmed at the side profile.

    if you want me to post an image of an MRI and show and educate symptoms I had I will gladly post my most recent from December 2013.

    patient studies are performed daily and there is always a second done to contradict the first and previous.

    most web sites if you go that route show that stenosis is a process of aging some people get it earlier then others but all it is is the hardening of soft tissue or enlarged bone growth it happens with time, other cases develop it from injuries to the spine such as ruptured disks.

    we could debate all day about this, but speaking from experience from spinal injuries and spending many days and nights dealing with ortho and nuro im sharing what i have been told by highly rearguard specialist from both boston when i asked some of the same questions

  23. Name:  KEN'S SPINE.jpg
Views: 70
Size:  42.6 KB
    This is a quick look at my last mri this caused sever pain in both left and right legs with left side drop foot and 80% strength loss also Cauda Equina Syndrome lost bladder function

    L5-S1 dislocation the vertebra slipped and collapsed the disk result TILF (trans intrabody lumbar fusion) they used two rods and 4 screws and autograph bone. they had to remove all the bone and tissue overgrowth from L2-L4 with L2-L3 complete disk removal which caused the bladder loss

    This link will show a normal spine MRI with a small bulge at L1-L2 that a specialist would look right over and dismiss as a source of pain
    Emerald Coast Pain Services

  24. I'm not really sure how any of this applies to OP, which is what this thread is about. He asked about how to fix his posture and correct a spinal curve, don't really think an MRI is indicated for that.

    I'm not going to sit here and discuss your mri and story and muffle this thread with irrelevant information.

  25. I agree this is about the OP, but your information was not on point so we started a discussion inside the thread on it. I followed up with information and a couple of pics explaining certain spinal conditions

    To be clear the I feel the OP does not have nerve related issues but still needs to get looked at by his primary care so they can make the correct course of actions and follow up with ortho to get full diagnoses.
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