The effects of foam rolling on post exercise fatigue

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    The effects of foam rolling on post exercise fatigue


    The effects of myofascial release with f... [J Strength Cond Res. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI


    The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance.


    The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance. J Strength Cond Res 28(1): 61-68, 2014-In the last decade, self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary. However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance. Twenty-six (13 men and 13 women) healthy college-aged individuals (21.56 2.04 years, 23.97 3.98 body mass index, 20.57 12.21 percent body fat) were recruited. The study design was a randomized crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured. A 2 2 (trial gender) analysis of variance with repeated measures and appropriate post hoc was used to analyze the data. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests. However, there was a significant difference between genders on all the athletic tests (p ≤ 0.001). As expected, there were significant increases from pre to post exercise during both trials for fatigue, soreness, and exertion (p ≤ 0.01). Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking (p ≤ 0.05). The reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance.
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

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    although, it may not improve performance directly in the short term. I still presume that the other benefits that have been studied (mobility, range of motion, reduction of DOMS) would all eventually lead to better performance in the long term.
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    Great post. I would agree that I feel much better after my leg day when I have rolled my legs out before hand. I would also say that I "feel" better during the workout even if it doesn't lead to a strength increase. For me it's definitely worth taking 10 minutes to feel a whole lot better for the next 2-3 days.
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    While the researchers found no direct beneficial effect on performance, they did hypothesize that - foam rolling = decreased fatigue = ability to increase workout time, volume & intensity = performance enhancement. So it is possibly and definitely plausible that foam rolling can have an indirect benefit on performance.
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
    While the researchers found no direct beneficial effect on performance, they did hypothesize that - foam rolling = decreased fatigue = ability to increase workout time, volume & intensity = performance enhancement. So it is possibly and definitely plausible that foam rolling can have an indirect benefit on performance.
    Yep. I'm a fan of it for sure. I guess in the strict definition of "performance" they didn't get significant results, but as you said added endurance is basically = performance.
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    Smart foam rolling leads to improved mobility leads to better mechanics in training movements leads to fewer injuries leads to less interruptions leads to vastly increased performance. Think about the gains you make if you're not zigzagging from this strain and that tear. It's big.
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    Quote Originally Posted by herderdude View Post
    Smart foam rolling leads to improved mobility leads to better mechanics in training movements leads to fewer injuries leads to less interruptions leads to vastly increased performance. Think about the gains you make if you're not zigzagging from this strain and that tear. It's big.
    You're big.
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    Great post and glad you shared this
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyjd View Post

    You're big.
    It's cause I foam roll.
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    How about comparing to regular dynamic warm up routine groups that people do prior to working out or participating in sports??

    And if you are studying for mechanisms, as written in the abstract, one major mechanism that still hasn't be ruled out is the placebo effect!
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    nice article
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    Quote Originally Posted by anoopbal View Post
    How about comparing to regular dynamic warm up routine groups that people do prior to working out or participating in sports??

    And if you are studying for mechanisms, as written in the abstract, one major mechanism that still hasn't be ruled out is the placebo effect!
    Good questions here. I think, ultimately, science is trying to help people figure out exactly what is BEST in terms of warming up to a workout or cooling down from one... There will never be a definitive answer. Between science and its need to control every variable in a study and anecdotal evidence (potentially placebo as you pointed out) that has people world-round supplying their two-cent "Well it worked for me", I really think that there will only ever be a middle ground.

    Personally I like both dynamic warm-ups and foam rolling. Can't say I've noticed a difference either way. I honestly can't say I've noticed a difference when I simply stretched before a workout either. And that's supposed to be a HUGE no-no. But whatever...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savageous View Post
    Good questions here. I think, ultimately, science is trying to help people figure out exactly what is BEST in terms of warming up to a workout or cooling down from one... There will never be a definitive answer. Between science and its need to control every variable in a study and anecdotal evidence (potentially placebo as you pointed out) that has people world-round supplying their two-cent "Well it worked for me", I really think that there will only ever be a middle ground.

    Personally I like both dynamic warm-ups and foam rolling. Can't say I've noticed a difference either way. I honestly can't say I've noticed a difference when I simply stretched before a workout either. And that's supposed to be a HUGE no-no. But whatever...
    Honestly though, look at it this way. Even if it's a placebo that is causing increased ROM and endurance with less DOMS, doesn't that just prove that placebo can be useful in it's own right? What I mean to say is, sometimes if it "works for me", then maybe it just really does as opposed to having verifiable proof that it's actually a result of my actions as opposed to my belief in those actions. A.K.A. "results don't lie."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyjd View Post
    Honestly though, look at it this way. Even if it's a placebo that is causing increased ROM and endurance with less DOMS, doesn't that just prove that placebo can be useful in it's own right? What I mean to say is, sometimes if it "works for me", then maybe it just really does as opposed to having verifiable proof that it's actually a result of my actions as opposed to my belief in those actions. A.K.A. "results don't lie."
    I completely agree. I don't believe that placebo can be discounted in many situations because of how strong the power of belief/want to believe is.

    That, of course, goes in line with what I'm saying. It's a happy middle-ground. Science will say lots of things but one thing it seems to never say is, "Or do whatever works best for you." Because, in the end, it's what we all end up doing anyway.

    Also - I'm not always satisfied with these studies as verifiable proof as I'm sure you're not either. The bodybuilding community was onto something when it came to dieting for building mass/cutting fat far before science or the studies caught up. Thanks, Mikey!
    All Business.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyjd View Post
    Honestly though, look at it this way. Even if it's a placebo that is causing increased ROM and endurance with less DOMS, doesn't that just prove that placebo can be useful in it's own right? What I mean to say is, sometimes if it "works for me", then maybe it just really does as opposed to having verifiable proof that it's actually a result of my actions as opposed to my belief in those actions. A.K.A. "results don't lie."
    Where did you find increase in ROM & endurance??

    From the study: "Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking". Means none of the objective measures of performance showed any difference (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). We don't want people to think they are getting better, we want them to get better!

    And there is a good reason why drug companies spend billions & billions of dollars comparing a drug to a PLACEBO.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anoopbal View Post
    Where did you find increase in ROM & endurance??

    From the study: "Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking". Means none of the objective measures of performance showed any difference (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). We don't want people to think they are getting better, we want them to get better!

    And there is a good reason why drug companies spend billions & billions of dollars comparing a drug to a PLACEBO.
    The study did say that the decrease in fatigue logically lends itself to chronically increased performance over time. I know that the "performance" increase didn't strictly fit their definition, but I'd say that for all intensive purposes the capacity to extend "acute workout time and volume" is an increase in performance in the broader sense of the word. I wasn't saying that Foam rolling was having a placebo effect, but merely making reference to the idea that one can sometimes capture the power of placebo to their advantage.
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    Quote Originally Posted by herderdude View Post
    Smart foam rolling leads to improved mobility leads to better mechanics in training movements leads to fewer injuries leads to less interruptions leads to vastly increased performance. Think about the gains you make if you're not zigzagging from this strain and that tear. It's big.
    Exactly! Tis why I foam roll on the daily! Being a 30 year old athlete, gotta do everything possible to try and ensure injuries dont happen! Because unlike when I was in my early 20's, an injury is no longer just a few day set back, its usually weeks n months lost!
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    I wouldn't attribute foam rolling or any other form of myofascial release as 'performance enhancing' in a direct sense, but rather utilize it for the other purported benefits. I'm also assuming they foam rolled once then conducted the trials and then ceased the study, correct? If so, is there any evidence the athletes who were in the control group were not actively foam rolling prior to the studies commencement?

    A longer duration study may have been preferred to determine whether or not foam rolling could attribute to indirect performance increments.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyjd View Post
    The study did say that the decrease in fatigue logically lends itself to chronically increased performance over time.
    The decreased fatigue is compared to 'planking for 30 sec' which means zilch to anyone involved in performance or athletics. And when you do planks( not supported) and foam rolling (weight supported) for 30 sec for around 5 body parts which one do you expect to be more tiring?

    If they wanted to show a decrease in fatigue, take athletes do their warm up and then do foam rolling and then show a decrease in fatigue. I am not sure why this study is getting so much attention.

    Their conclusion is good i think:

    "The results of this study suggest that SMR through the use of foam rollers before a workout does not enhance athletic performance. Since workout time with athletes is often limited, strength and conditioning coaches should take this information into account when planning how to best use the time in a training session. However, perceived fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less compared with the control condition of planking. Foam Rolling may offer subjects a feeling of relaxation, which may have psychological benefits to some people."
  

  
 

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