60 seconds or less between sets increases your testosterone - AnabolicMinds.com

60 seconds or less between sets increases your testosterone

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    60 seconds or less between sets increases your testosterone


    I've been reading a few forums and heard if you keep your rest time between sets to 60 seconds or less it increases your testosterone, has anybody else heard of this???

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    I believe more in instinct training. I don't look at my watch in the gym and panic when 61 seconds have passed. My body lets me know.

    Lift,rest as long as it takes you to do it again and repeat.

    I'm usually in the gym 1 to 3hours,realistically given the stereotype of the 45 minute rule*for those who believe it* shouldn't I have wasted away by now? Let your body decide
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    Maybe your right! But I have tried this the past few days in the gym and I feel like it is working because like u say your body does let u no but It feels my body is already telling me to carry on with this. I feel the pump in my muscles is more intense and the next day my testosterone seems to be increasing..... Whether its all in the mind I no but I'm just gunna carry on with this for a few weeks and see the outcome.
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    I doubt it. keeping your workouts shorter may help keep test elevated due to lower cortisol but thats not same as 30 sec between sets.
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    Well, I do DC training so if I get 10 seconds between reps that's all I need. Noticed good gains, so can't quite comment negatively.
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    Depends completely on the type and goals of the training. Max lifts don't favor this type of rest period.
    Always open light. Itís not what you open with, itís what you finish with. Louie Simmons
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    The Finnish study that gets cited often is misrepresented. The study design is not rest interval based (60 sec vs 3 min) but on 1 group doign leg extensions only and group 2 doing a combo of upper body exercises then leg extensions. ergo-log . com/testrest.html.

    To me the differences between the groups may be statistically significant but not biologically significant. Test is elevated in the study but I doubt the increase is able to increase hypertrophy or strength gains any measurable amount above the baseline. Sure there's a window where group 1 is up like 20% on test but it only lasts for 15 min. I can increase test much more llegally for a much longer period of time like weeks with $20 of DAA.
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    How do you feel your testosterone increasing the day after? I don't believe the hormonal changes in your body directly related to a single training session are that dramatic to give you any physiological symptoms of increased testosterone.
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    I believe there are more conclusive studies out that show the testosterone/GH secreting benefits of heavy compound movements. I'll stick to those.
    Always open light. Itís not what you open with, itís what you finish with. Louie Simmons
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    Whatever makes u work harder in the gym is what u should do, who cares if its in ur head or not.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZMIDLYF View Post
    I believe there are more conclusive studies out that show the testosterone/GH secreting benefits of heavy compound movements. I'll stick to those.
    Correct.

    The trend with regards to the GH and T response appears to be something like this:

    Shorter rest periods, higher volume, moderate intensity appears to trigger the most GH release, and this release is also associated with lactate production (i.e.: 4 x 10 @ 75% 1RM with 45-60 rest).

    Longer rest periods, lower volume, higher intensity, longer rest triggers a greater T response (i.e.: 5 x 5 @ 88%, 3-5 min rest). This response appears to be reduced (and cort elevated) if the sets are taken to failure.

    All that said, the response all seems to fade away with conditioning, and it doesn't appear that big manipulations in this response effect gains very much. Read differently: The response is needed to make gains (if you blunt the response, you're screwed), but eliciting a 10% greater increase in T or GH with training isn't going to make a hell of a lot of difference.
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    Muscle college radio just covered in training hormone release...it's not something to really base your workouts around

    with that said, i don't look at the clock but tend to like shorter rest periods...things like squats obviously have longer rest periods...but i don't have the patience to wait 2-3 minutes between sets, but i rarly do max lifts....i'd much rather increase intensity doing other things than just heavy lifting
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaun16 View Post
    Maybe your right! But I have tried this the past few days in the gym and I feel like it is working because like u say your body does let u no but It feels my body is already telling me to carry on with this. I feel the pump in my muscles is more intense and the next day my testosterone seems to be increasing..... Whether its all in the mind I no but I'm just gunna carry on with this for a few weeks and see the outcome.
    Maybe by rushing more, you are obviously increasing the intensity of your W/O's, no!?
    Also, by changing things up, you are no longer adapted to what you were doing
    The one problem I see with it for me, is on the big exercises ie: squats, deadlifts, heavy rows, OHP's or BP's where the weight I would be using 80%-85%-90% of my 1RM, is going to be hard for me to be at optimum recovery and ready to go again in under 60 secs, especially as I get past the 3rd/4th/5th... sets.
    Sure smaller muscle groups or iso moves why not!?
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulBlack View Post
    Maybe by rushing more, you are obviously increasing the intensity of your W/O's, no!?
    Also, by changing things up, you are no longer adapted to what you were doing
    The one problem I see with it for me, is on the big exercises ie: squats, deadlifts, heavy rows, OHP's or BP's where the weight I would be using 80%-85%-90% of my 1RM, is going to be hard for me to be at optimum recovery and ready to go again in under 60 secs, especially as I get past the 3rd/4th/5th... sets.
    Sure smaller muscle groups or iso moves why not!?
    The definition of intensity is percentage of 1RM i.e. if you lift at a higher intensity you are lifting a heavier weight on that given lift.

    Decreasing rest periods will result in using lower weights and therefore you would be training at a lower intensity.

    I know what you are getting at though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdcc View Post
    The definition of intensity is percentage of 1RM i.e. if you lift at a higher intensity you are lifting a heavier weight on that given lift.

    Decreasing rest periods will result in using lower weights and therefore you would be training at a lower intensity.
    Disagree with definition specifics.
    Many "could" use the same weight, but shorten rest time, increasing power out put to finish the set, say an rpe scale (rate of perceived exertion).
    20 rep squats can be more intense than a heavier weight for 2x10 reps. It depends on the RPE at the 20th compared to the RPE at 10th. So I can't say it is "more" weight alone, that determines intensity factors.
    But I see what "you're saying" too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulBlack View Post
    Disagree with definition specifics.
    Many "could" use the same weight, but shorten rest time, increasing power out put to finish the set, say an rpe scale (rate of perceived exertion).
    20 rep squats can be more intense than a heavier weight for 2x10 reps. It depends on the RPE at the 20th compared to the RPE at 10th. So I can't say it is "more" weight alone, that determines intensity factors.
    But I see what "you're saying" too.
    What I am saying is the true definition of intensity in weightlifting is the percentage of 1RM and has nothing to do with perceived exertion.

    High rep workouts may feel more intense in terms of exertion but do not fit the actual definition of intensity because a lower weight is used e.g. a back squat of 90% 1RM is a higher intensity than a back squat at 60% 1RM irrespective of the number of repetitions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulBlack View Post
    Disagree with definition specifics.
    Many "could" use the same weight, but shorten rest time, increasing power out put to finish the set, say an rpe scale (rate of perceived exertion).
    20 rep squats can be more intense than a heavier weight for 2x10 reps. It depends on the RPE at the 20th compared to the RPE at 10th. So I can't say it is "more" weight alone, that determines intensity factors.
    But I see what "you're saying" too.
    Now we are getting into semantics.

    What you are describing Paul is a mix of relative intensity (How close to failure you are working) and RPE.

    Absolute intensity, or when you see intensity in a strength and conditioning program refers to the % of the 1rm.

    So, although 3 x 10 @ 70% is not working at 100% absolute intensity (you are not using your 1rm) it could be at 100% relative intensity.


    Either way, manipulation of rest periods to achieve a certain goal is what separates a good programmer apart from a "mix that sh*t up" bro.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Now we are getting into semantics.

    What you are describing Paul is a mix of relative intensity (How close to failure you are working) and RPE.

    Absolute intensity, or when you see intensity in a strength and conditioning program refers to the % of the 1rm.

    So, although 3 x 10 @ 70% is not working at 100% absolute intensity (you are not using your 1rm) it could be at 100% relative intensity.


    Either way, manipulation of rest periods to achieve a certain goal is what separates a good programmer apart from a "mix that sh*t up" bro.
    Quote Originally Posted by bdcc View Post
    What I am saying is the true definition of intensity in weightlifting is the percentage of 1RM and has nothing to do with perceived exertion.

    High rep workouts may feel more intense in terms of exertion but do not fit the actual definition of intensity because a lower weight is used e.g. a back squat of 90% 1RM is a higher intensity than a back squat at 60% 1RM irrespective of the number of repetitions.
    Understood
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