Conventional vs Sumo deadlift

  1. Pro Virili Parte
    Board Sponsor
    JudoJosh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    29
    Posts
    8,774
    Rep Power
    2088894

    Conventional vs Sumo deadlift


    A three-dimensional biomechanical analysis of sumo and conventional style deadlifts.

    Abstract

    PURPOSE:

    Strength athletes often employ the deadlift in their training or rehabilitation regimens. The purpose of this study was to quantify kinematic and kinetic parameters by employing a three-dimensional analysis during sumo and conventional style deadlifts.

    METHODS:

    Two 60-Hz video cameras recorded 12 sumo and 12 conventional style lifters during a national powerlifting championship. Parameters were quantified at barbell liftoff (LO), at the instant the barbell passed the knees (KP), and at lift completion. Unpaired t-tests (P < 0.05) were used to compare all parameters.

    RESULTS:

    At LO and KP, thigh position was 11-16 degrees more horizontal for the sumo group, whereas the knees and hips extended approximately 12 degrees more for the conventional group. The sumo group had 5-10 degrees greater vertical trunk and thigh positions, employed a wider stance (70 +/- 11 cm vs 32 +/- 8 cm), turned their feet out more (42 +/- 8 vs 14 +/- 6 degrees). and gripped the bar with their hands closer together (47 +/- 4 cm vs 55 +/- 10 cm). Vertical bar distance, mechanical work, and predicted energy expenditure were approximately 25-40% greater in the conventional group. Hip extensor, knee extensor, and ankle dorsiflexor moments were generated for the sumo group, whereas hip extensor, knee extensor, knee flexor, and ankle plantar flexor moments were generated for the conventional group. Ankle and knee moments and moment arms were significantly different between the sumo and conventional groups, whereas hip moments and moments arms did not show any significantly differences. Three-dimensional calculations were more accurate and significantly different than two-dimensional calculations, especially for the sumo deadlift.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Biomechanical differences between sumo and conventional deadlifts result from technique variations between these exercises. Understanding these differences will aid the strength coach or rehabilitation specialist in determining which deadlift style an athlete or patient should employ.

    PMID: 10912892
    .....
    Biomechanical analysis of the deadlift during the 1999 Special Olympics World Games.

    Abstract

    PURPOSE:

    Improper lifting techniques may increase injury risks and decrease performance. The aim of this study was to compare and contrast biomechanical parameters between sumo and conventional style deadlifts and between high- and low-skilled lifters who participated in the powerlifting event during the 1999 Special Olympics World Games.

    METHODS:

    Two synchronized video cameras collected 60 Hz of data from 40 subjects. Parameters were quantified at barbell liftoff (LO), when the barbell passed the knees (KP), and at lift completion.

    RESULTS:

    Compared with the conventional group, the sumo group had a 100% greater stance width, 20% smaller hand width, 10% less vertical bar distance, a more vertical trunk at LO, a more horizontal thigh at LO and KP, a less vertical shank at KP, and greater forefoot abduction. The sumo group generated ankle dorsiflexor, knee extensor, and hip extensor moments, whereas the conventional group produced ankle plantar flexor, knee flexor and extensor, and hip extensor moments. Compared with low-skilled lifters, high-skilled lifters had a 40% greater barbell load, 15% greater stance width (sumo group only), greater knee flexion at LO (conventional group only), greater knee extension at KP, a less vertical shank position at LO (sumo group only), 15% less vertical bar distance, less first peak bar velocity between LO and KP (conventional group only), smaller plantar flexor and hip extensor moment arms at LO and KP, and greater knee extensor moment arms at LO.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The sumo deadlift may be more effective in working ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors, whereas the conventional deadlift may be more effective in working ankle plantar flexors and knee flexors. High-skilled lifters exhibited better lifting mechanics than low-skilled lifters by keeping the bar closer to the body, which may both enhance performance and minimize injury risk.

    PMID: 11474337
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  2. Running with the Big Boys
    Board Sponsor
    Rodja's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    30
    Posts
    23,087
    Rep Power
    918008

    Nice find and with ME as well.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  3. Registered User
    SweetLou321's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  188 lbs.
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    3,464
    Rep Power
    115379

    To bad I still pull more with a conventional stance.
    •   
       

  4. Registered User
    Torobestia's Avatar
    Stats
    6'3"  250 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,199
    Rep Power
    141049

    These are definitely more physiology and mechanical physics related papers than I'm used to. In lay terms, what do these papers show and why should we care?
  5. Registered User
    Swanson52's Avatar
    Stats
    6'2"  300 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Nefukkinbraska
    Age
    39
    Posts
    3,075
    Rep Power
    532236

    Quote Originally Posted by Torobestia View Post
    These are definitely more physiology and mechanical physics related papers than I'm used to. In lay terms, what do these papers show and why should we care?
    From my cursory analysis, it appears that one does less work (bimechanically) when pulling sumo vs conventional.
    Don't worry, man, someday I'ma be nobody too.
  6. Registered User
    Bigez's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  240 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    22
    Rep Power
    1491

    For me and my body,I have always pulled sumo.It allows me to keep upper body more vertical and takes my lower back out of the big strain and allows my legs to do the work.
  7. Registered User
    Lutztenways's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  160 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    146
    Rep Power
    88637

    I feel sumo deadlifts in my glutes more, I feel more stable and I can use heavier weight, does this sound reasonable or do I have a form issue? The added strength has me looking forward to my sumo pulls all week long.
  8. Registered User
    Vipersg123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Age
    27
    Posts
    609
    Rep Power
    572

    I like both stances, but tend to stay conventional. However if my low back is sore I will go with sumo as it is much easier on the low back
  9. Registered User
    16dawg23's Avatar
    Stats
    5'6"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    112
    Rep Power
    711

    yeah vip i go with sumo (dumbel) high rep, i suffer from low back probs,and i believe they have helped my gains in a big way. makes for taxing leg day but ya gotta do what ya gotta do...lol
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Pros vs Bros Deadlift for Reps.
    By VolcomX311 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-16-2011, 03:05 PM
  2. Sumo Deadlift Help
    By DeepDarkHills in forum Powerlifting/Strongman
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-13-2010, 07:47 PM
  3. Deadlift: Hex Bar Vs. Straight Bar
    By Esox Express in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-20-2009, 07:33 PM
  4. Verticle Grip Deadlifts vs. Traditional Barbell
    By Highlanda01602 in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-30-2007, 08:02 PM
  5. Conventional Deadlifter but Sumo Curious
    By Whaler in forum Powerlifting/Strongman
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-10-2007, 01:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in