Static stretching bad?

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    Static stretching bad?


    Is it bad for you?

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    it can lower power output so do it after a workout. other then that its not bad at all. its just another tool in your toolbox.
    you can call me "ozzie" for short.
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    Agreed with above statement. In addition, full Rom resistance training can be an effective method to enhance active range flexibility itself. I also don't think there have been too many studies showing a strong correlation between ss and reduced injury rates
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdb2 View Post
    Agreed with above statement. In addition, full Rom resistance training can be an effective method to enhance active range flexibility itself. I also don't think there have been too many studies showing a strong correlation between ss and reduced injury rates
    That, and incorrect stretching or imbalanced stretch program can lead to lax joints and increase risk of injury.

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyin808 View Post
    I agree that static stretching should be good for prevention of injury or even if your are injured. But overall I would would say dynamic or plyometric warm ups would be the best
    No scientific evidence exists that static stretching leads to a decrease in injuries.
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyin808 View Post
    Yes after u work out...not before! Static stretching helps decrease the chances of DOMS or future injury after a workout!
    I bet you can't find studies to back up either of these points.

    http://sweatscience.com/stretching-d...scle-soreness/
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    Studies published in both the British Medical Journal(1999) and the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine(2002)have found that static stretching has NO statistically significant effect on reducing muscle soreness or injuries.

    A 2008 study of over 1,000 soldiers had half stretch and half not stretch found no difference in the frequency of injuries.
    Repeating something over and over doesn't make it correct.
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyin808 View Post
    I understand we're ur coming from but your information is based on the general world of exercising...I am referring to athletic performance. Studies have shown reduce of injury for players and athletes that have type two muscle fibers versus those that have type 1.. But u have points....
    Can you please reference these? What type of injury during what type of exercise in what type of athletes??
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Can you please reference these? What type of injury during what type of exercise in what type of athletes??
    Would you agree that static stretching is important for those with imbalances like internal humerus rotation, protracted shoulders, lordosis, etc.?
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Would you agree that static stretching is important for those with imbalances like internal humerus rotation, protracted shoulders, lordosis, etc.?
    Absolutely. Static stretching is very useful in correcting/preventing muscular imbalances and improving sport specific flexibility.

    Does static acute stretching prevent or reduce the risk of injury....despite what the populus may believe, it doesn't appear to.

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyin808 View Post
    Since static stretching is used to prevent muscle imbalances, could you say that it could prevent injury? I mean muscle imbalances, if treated properly could leans to a future injury. But I also believe that dynamic and static could go hand in hand together..
    Yes, chronic static stretching can reduce the risk of injuries. A static stretching routine prescribed to help correct flexibility deficiencies or imbalances over time will improve mobility and movement, and reduce the risk of injury. Dynamic stretching is good as an acute way to reduce injury risk, as it both increases muscle temperature/blood flow and works to activate the muscles.

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Yes, chronic static stretching can reduce the risk of injuries. A static stretching routine prescribed to help correct flexibility deficiencies or imbalances over time will improve mobility and movement, and reduce the risk of injury. Dynamic stretching is good as an acute way to reduce injury risk, as it both increases muscle temperature/blood flow and works to activate the muscles.

    Br
    What would you say about something like this?

    Pre-workout: Dynamic stretching, workout, post workout: static stretching? Or would you say it'd be better to do dynamic stretching on a separate day?

    Thanks.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    What would you say about something like this?

    Pre-workout: Dynamic stretching, workout, post workout: static stretching? Or would you say it'd be better to do dynamic stretching on a separate day?

    Thanks.
    That's about what I do.

    Warm up with dynamic stretching and mobility drills.
    Workout
    Static stretching

    You can even work needed static stretching into the workout. For example, I work hip flexor stretches into my lower body workouts. I'll also put hip opening movements into my upper body workouts, or both as part of a core and fixator circuit at the end.

    Br
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    To clarify I wasn't trying to say that static stretching had no positive uses or applications. Merely that the idea that static stretching reduces injuries or lessens DOMS isn't backed up by any scientific research which still no one in this thread has challenged. I'm not against static stretching by any means (though I think it's misused pretty much all the time), but the if the idea is you're decreasing your risk of injury by bending over and trying to touch your toes you're mistaken.
  

  
 

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