Increased stride frequency reduces running injury risk

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    Increased stride frequency reduces running injury risk


    We see less impact, especially on the knees, when stride frequency is increased and stride length is decreased. A few good styles to look at that take this into account for distance running are Chi running and the POSE method of running.

    Effects of Step Rate Manipulation on Joint Mechanics during Running (Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; Chumanov, Elizabeth S.; Michalski, Max P.; Wille, Christa M.; Ryan, Michael B.)

    Abstract
    Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the biomechanical effects of step rate modification during running on the hip, knee and ankle joints, so as to evaluate a potential strategy to reduce lower extremity loading and risk for injury.

    Methods: Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 45 healthy recreational runners during treadmill running at constant speed under various step rate conditions (preferred, +/- 5% and +/- 10%). We tested our primary hypothesis that a reduction in energy absorption by the lower extremity joints during the loading response would occur, primarily at the knee, when step rate was increased.

    Results: Less mechanical energy was absorbed at the knee (p<0.01) during the +5% and +10% step rate conditions, while the hip (p<0.01) absorbed less energy during the +10% condition only. All joints displayed substantially (p<0.01) more energy absorption when preferred step rate was reduced by 10. Step length (p<0.01), center of mass vertical excursion (p<0.01), breaking impulse (p<0.01) and peak knee flexion angle (p<0.01) were observed to decrease with increasing step rate. When step rate was increased 10% above preferred, peak hip adduction angle (p<0.01), as well as peak hip adduction (p<0.01) and internal rotation (p<0.01) moments, were found to decrease.

    Conclusion: We conclude that subtle increases in step rate can substantially reduce the loading to the hip and knee joints during running and may prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of common running-related injuries.

    (C) 2010The American College of Sports Medicine
    Br

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    I thought this was common knowledge. Overstriding is bad. One of the reasons vibrams are so good is that they attempt to get you to reduce your stride.
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    Perhaps common knowledge in the S&C educated.

    But, here's what I see at the gym or the track all the time:

    People banging away at the treadmill..coming down really heavy on the heel, rolling to the toe, and then very poor backside mechanics. The introduction and popularity of excessively padded running shoes makes this worse, and actually causes the mass population to believe you should be running heel to toe. As an orthopedic surgeon once told me "If everyone ran barefoot I'd only have to work part time"

    Br
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    I've seen these studies but never really found them useful until I started running longer distances. One of the premier ultra runners from my area has discussed this topic on occasion. I had the chance to see him in action on a 24hr race. His stride is very short but his turnover is really fast. Must be working for him considering he logged 130ish miles in that 24hr period.
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    Not only reduces injury, but improves sprint speed. I am a 100 meter sprinter and dropped my time last season from 11.7 to 11.0 based on a technique that emphasized this. I focused on the feet in the frontal mechanics-the farthest your feet should go is tucked under trunk, half a foot ahead max, not perpendicular to the ground with a right angle from shin to quads. thats the running style that causes injuries
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    Quote Originally Posted by brock17cf View Post
    Not only reduces injury, but improves sprint speed. I am a 100 meter sprinter and dropped my time last season from 11.7 to 11.0 based on a technique that emphasized this. I focused on the feet in the frontal mechanics-the farthest your feet should go is tucked under trunk, half a foot ahead max, not perpendicular to the ground with a right angle from shin to quads. thats the running style that causes injuries
    Can you send me a link to exercises/drills to improve this technique?

    I too am a sprinter, and am always looking for information that will improve my times and mechanics.

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Can you send me a link to exercises/drills to improve this technique?

    I too am a sprinter, and am always looking for information that will improve my times and mechanics.

    Br
    Check out elite tracks article- "Maximum velocity sprint mechanics"
    Near the bottom of the article there is a piece called 'flight phase'. this why i changed what i did in my sprinting, i focused only where my knee was (level with hips and forward) and not where the foot was. The foot should not make a right angle with the ground in front, that is where hamstring injuries often occur-the deceleration of the lower leg in the flight phase. When the foot doesnt travel as far forward, the hamstring has less strain. Also, there is a decreased time that leg recovers overall, improving stride rate.

    Unnderground secrets to faster running was the book i used for training..
    It basically emphasizes maxing out on deadlifts 4-5 days a week, if ya have any questions, I love discussing this- it gave me great results!
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