Any experienced boxers here?

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    Any experienced boxers here?


    I'm in my mid 40's and in very good shape. One of my dreams in life has always been to box. Well, as some of the older crowd here can attest, life, work, kids and everything else pushes your dreams down the totem pole.

    I have never boxed and never plan on getting in the ring per se. I am merely looking to hit the heavy and speed bags and learn a bit about the sport, techniques (proper way to punch), and also tap into the cardiovascular positives of a boxer's training.

    So, yes, I will be boxing in the basement in large part lol.

    I need input on the best way to get started. Any advice is appreciated

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    Learning jump rope fundamentals are huge to getting down footwork and timing. Also, look into footwork drills. That's the best place to start.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    If your plan is to set up heavy + speed bags in your basement and do most of your training there then I would seriously consider finding a good coach and getting private lessons once every week or so (budget willing).

    A lot of boxing is simply repetition to develop the motor skills and reactions but there are a lot of subtleties that are hard to learn without good coaching. Lets face it, at 40+ you probably want do it right the first time.
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    Thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whacked View Post
    I'm in my mid 40's and in very good shape. One of my dreams in life has always been to box. Well, as some of the older crowd here can attest, life, work, kids and everything else pushes your dreams down the totem pole.

    I have never boxed and never plan on getting in the ring per se. I am merely looking to hit the heavy and speed bags and learn a bit about the sport, techniques (proper way to punch), and also tap into the cardiovascular positives of a boxer's training.

    So, yes, I will be boxing in the basement in large part lol.

    I need input on the best way to get started. Any advice is appreciated
    I've been boxing for the past 15 years, on an amateur basis. I also cover the sport professionally, for a few online publications.

    A heavy bag is a great way to start, since the bag is heavily weighted, it will help in developing the upper body quite effectively. In terms of endurance and speed development, a speed bag is a highly effective tool in those regards.


    Start out by learning the proper techniques for throwing each punch, coaches will usually assign a number for a specific punch thrown, so for example a jab would be considered a 1, then a follow up left or right might be considered 2, you'll begin to learn and understand combination punching, as each number will correlate to something you and your coach are working on.
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    Hope u have high ceilings in the basement to hang a heavy bag from most r way to low...

    I did a little gold gloves outta college. Find a gym take some lessons and stand infront of a mirror for long periods of time watching ur form and technique. Training by urself is almost impossible but if u are a very motivated and a little insane it can be done. Teddy Atlas has a cpl good movies and some combo bags that u can shellout for or get the duct tape out and fake.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whacked View Post
    I'm in my mid 40's and in very good shape. One of my dreams in life has always been to box. Well, as some of the older crowd here can attest, life, work, kids and everything else pushes your dreams down the totem pole.

    I have never boxed and never plan on getting in the ring per se. I am merely looking to hit the heavy and speed bags and learn a bit about the sport, techniques (proper way to punch), and also tap into the cardiovascular positives of a boxer's training.

    So, yes, I will be boxing in the basement in large part lol.

    I need input on the best way to get started. Any advice is appreciated
    Make sure you learn how to wrap your hands properly, and do use gloves to hit the heavy bag. I compete in MMA and have seen many people mess up their hands/wrists because the didn't do it properly. Like someone else said learn the techniques for each punch. If you want to be serious about your training. Practicing hitting the bag w/o proper technique will make it 10 times harder to learn it later on.
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    Technique is an absolute golden when it comes to throwing a proper punch.

    Your foundation is your stance, make sure you know how to pivot off your foot and throw your weight into a punch. Make sure your jab foot is always facing the opponent and your power foot is at an angle that allows the pivot to happen. Make sure most of your punches are straight (1, 2) you'll call it.

    Honestly just watch some youtube videos on how to properly punch and stand and learn some outside slips and stuff and you'll do fine. I boxed amateur for fifteen months and currently still box as a hobby 2-3 times per month (not in competition though).

    I would recommend mixed martial arts over simple boxing though. Learn how to use your legs and submission wrestling as well as boxing.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whacked View Post
    life, work, kids and everything else pushes your dreams down the totem pole.
    Amen to that! You can get a boxing cert that will help you with technique and some basic fundmentals. Finding a workshop would be a great idea cause you don't plan on taking it to the ring.

    http://www.iscafit.com/certs.asp
    ôLord, whom shall we go away to? You have sayings of everlasting life"- John 6:68

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    Thanks again all
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    Quote Originally Posted by southpaw23 View Post
    I've been boxing for the past 15 years, on an amateur basis. I also cover the sport professionally, for a few online publications.

    A heavy bag is a great way to start, since the bag is heavily weighted, it will help in developing the upper body quite effectively. In terms of endurance and speed development, a speed bag is a highly effective tool in those regards.


    Start out by learning the proper techniques for throwing each punch, coaches will usually assign a number for a specific punch thrown, so for example a jab would be considered a 1, then a follow up left or right might be considered 2, you'll begin to learn and understand combination punching, as each number will correlate to something you and your coach are working on.
    Southpaw is right and I fully agree. Technique is number. i think he will agree with when I say things like: say your throwing a cross most people hit with arms and dont get their body into it, they are swinging it, finally they are not guarding their chin. Most important they are probably dropping their hands. So I stand by him and say get a coach. And not just a coach but be sure they are good.
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    I did some boxing back when I was younger. I then revisited it as park of a JKD training program. I can tell you as an instructor (not of martial arts) that PRIMACY is key. If you teach yourself wrong once, it takes forever to overwrite that. Learn it right from a trainer/coach the first time correctly, THEN save some money and practice at home with occasional visits back. Doing it wrong can be a) dangerous to you when you break something B) be a waste of time C) fail you if you actually one day need to defend yourself. Nothing in life worthwhile is best done by the easy road...
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    I would strongly suggest that you find a personal trainer or a boxing gym, just to get the basics down. You don't want to start off with bad form then have to correct it, instead learn the proper way, than just train on your own, i used to find myself going on youtube to find videos of different training methods, speed drills, speedbag...ect.

    Deff wrap your hands and always wear gloves, go easy at first not to hurt your wrists, and do exercises to protect/str them.
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    If you already know how to throw a proper punch then just get a heavy bag and go to town. Work on putting together combinations by shadow boxing, then throw them together on the bag. If you don't have a clue how to throw a proper punch, then get a coach.

    Personally, I think speed bags and jump ropes are useless for making you a better boxer. I know TONS of people who can do amazing things on a speed bag, but they can't box to save their lives. Speed bags teach you to punch wrong, they just get you used to repetitive timing, people don't fight like that. Your footwork while jump roping is nothing like it should be in the ring... Its good conditioning, but thats about it.

    Just my 2 cents.
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    I think every boxer and trainer will highly disagree with you regarding a speed bag and a jump rope.
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    I'm sure they would, but thats why its my opinion. Hitting a speed bag involves hitting a bag with a hammer fist. You NEVER punch like that in a boxing match. People's heads nor bodies rebound back like a speed bag either. Jump rope, while a decent conditioning tool, is a completely different type of footwork. When you throw a punch, you plant and drive with your back foot, often sliding your front foot. Jump roping doesn't involve any real forward, backward, or lateral movements. It is only vertical jumping. It doesn't pertain to boxing. Argue if you like, but shadow boxing is way better for footwork. And if you want to make the hand-eye coordination argument for the speed bag, then I will tell you that a focus bag is much better for that as well.

    Really not trying to argue here, but I like to rant, because some coaches do some really dumb things. Biggest pet peeve... most boxers like to run A LOT. For the most part boxing is an anaerobic sport... jogging is aerobic and has pretty much ZERO performance carryover. Timed intervals on the heavy bag or using focus mitts, as well as short intense/ longer less intense rounds would be much better conditioning. You can point to thousands of coaches who have had good results with jogging, but i can guarantee they could have had better results training like that. proven through TONS of research.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Legacyfighter View Post
    I'm sure they would, but thats why its my opinion. Hitting a speed bag involves hitting a bag with a hammer fist. You NEVER punch like that in a boxing match. People's heads nor bodies rebound back like a speed bag either. Jump rope, while a decent conditioning tool, is a completely different type of footwork. When you throw a punch, you plant and drive with your back foot, often sliding your front foot. Jump roping doesn't involve any real forward, backward, or lateral movements. It is only vertical jumping. It doesn't pertain to boxing. Argue if you like, but shadow boxing is way better for footwork. And if you want to make the hand-eye coordination argument for the speed bag, then I will tell you that a focus bag is much better for that as well.

    Really not trying to argue here, but I like to rant, because some coaches do some really dumb things. Biggest pet peeve... most boxers like to run A LOT. For the most part boxing is an anaerobic sport... jogging is aerobic and has pretty much ZERO performance carryover. Timed intervals on the heavy bag or using focus mitts, as well as short intense/ longer less intense rounds would be much better conditioning. You can point to thousands of coaches who have had good results with jogging, but i can guarantee they could have had better results training like that. proven through TONS of research.
    agreed
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    The purpose of the jump rope is for balance and to remain light on your feet. You're not supposed to just bounce up and down for 1000's of revolutions. What you're supposed to do is vary the tempo, bounces on each feet, 2-3 revolutions per jump, etc. To remain cognizant of your footwork while tired is the goal and their is a reason it's been a staple for generations of boxers.

    I do agree that their is too much dogma in boxing training such as running in the morning, but I agree with this one. You start with the feet and move up, not the other way around. Staying nimble and mobile is the name of the game in striking.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    Boxed threw highschool an was recruited to box at Naval Academy. Unfortunately I had taken a few to many blows to head for math portion of ACT an only got into the prep school.

    Theirs alot of good above, and alot of bad as well. Sitting in class so can't completely break everything Down but yes foot work is king. You have to learn how to move before you can move an strike. Yes jump roping works some don't agree but they honestly don't know ****. Don't just do some monotonous routine, learn to switch between what you doing you have to learn to be light on your feet. Second heavy bag as said before is key as well. You need to practice throwing punchs an throwing them with power. Get your wrist arms and shoulders used to putting a large amount of force into an object that doesn't move much when you land the most powerful punch you can. Very important because if your serious about boxing you will at some point spar/ fight some giant ugly fracker from Russia haha jk that will be stronger an in better shape. I've seen guys break wrists landing bad forum punches with everything they've got. The name of the game is practice. Boxing is not a sport you get good at in a week. As I'm sure most of the people who try an give you advice will. Have seen it tons guys who watch ultimate fighter or buy a pay per view an suddenly by some form of boxing/fighting magic are all knowing an suggestive to training an fighting. Sorry I'll get off my soap box. If you take nothing else from this post, the best thing you could possibly do, get a training PARTNER. He'll or a few. Yes you can learn some footwork with jumping rope. Yes you can learn some forum with a heavy bag, (learning combos are pretty useless on heavy bag by way, people don't stand still, aside from getting moves down) but you can't put it all together with out a partner. People move an react, the only way to account for that is to train for moving an reacting. Combos need to be learned with Mits. First then sparing. Sparing is the end all. Alot changes when punches are coming back at you and you are taking damage or bleeding. Spare spare spare! Get used to it, love it! Your going to get hit an have alot of headaches but that's the sport and it's an awesome sport! Don't let any one tell you to sit in basement an spend all your time on a heavy bag, their the ones who hit a bag everyday for a month, think their pro, come to spare at gym an get the **** beat out of them for a round an quite. Best of luck man it's an amazing sport you won't regret it! Just put the time in! Sorry for any spelling errors or on soap box sitting in calculus right now hard to keep a constant train of thought!
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    A boxer running in the morning is less a matter of conditioning, as it is a matter of creating a certain type of structure/discipline, which is a necessary evil, it's more mental than anything. The rationale being is that a boxer must learn to do things that feel and seem uncomfortable, so that once they enter that ring, nothing is a surprise. I once heard a conditioning expert say " I put my boxers through 8 weeks of hell, pushing them past their limits, so that on fight night being in that ring feels easier by comparison". And I can assure you for the elite in the sport, that approach works.

    Jumping rope as stated above is essential for increasing balance, especially in boxing, as certain types of combinations require either stepping off your back foot, or punching while backing up, or side to side movements. Its simply one method out of many to help strengthen balance. It's very easy to find yourself throwing combinations and then be out of position due to bad balance, see Miguel Cotto prior to hooking up with Manny Steward. As for the speed bag routine, it does help with hand eye coordination, in addition to being an effective conditioning tool.

    I agree with the poster above. It's a "requirement" to get in that ring and spar, in my gym it's considered mandatory. Besides all that it's fun and nothing helps you control fear more than stepping into that ring.
  

  
 

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