Are You Using Too Much Protein Powder? - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Are You Using Too Much Protein Powder?



      by: Gigi Chow NaturalNews

      Protein powders are increasingly popular. Fitness enthusiasts use the supplement for weight loss, building lean muscle mass and enhancing athletic performance while others use it as a convenient meal replacement or snack. However, are there undesirable and potentially harmful effects from excessive use?

      Recommended protein intake

      Protein requirement depends on several factors including body weight and activity levels. According to the International Society of Sports Nutrition, a daily intake of 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight or about 0.36 grams per pound is enough for nearly 97.5 percent of healthy men and women. A 150-pound person would therefore need about 54 grams of protein daily. For those who train intensely such as endurance athletes or power lifters, the recommendation is 1.4 to 2.0 grams per pound of body weight which is about 0.6 to 0.9 grams per pound. Pregnant women also need more protein. The average American diet contains 70 to 100 grams of protein daily, exceeding the recommendation.

      Protein and acidity

      A diet high in protein generates a large amount of acid in the body that the kidneys must eliminate. While some studies suggest that this increase in acidity can lead to several problems including kidney damage and osteoporosis, other studies dispute these findings.

      According to the proponents of the acid-alkaline diets, increased acidity is one of the major causes of inflammation which is associated with a host of conditions such as heart disease and cancer.

      Heavy metals

      In 2010, Consumer Reports magazine sampled 15 protein powders and drinks and found that most of them had low to moderate ranges of the heavy metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. When accumulated in the body, these heavy metals are toxic to major organs. The report found that with especially three of the popular brands, consumers who have three servings daily could be exposed to levels that exceed the maximum limits for heavy metal contaminants.

      Allergens and impurities

      Many popular protein powders are derived from whey and soy. Whey protein is derived from milk and the lactose in whey protein powders can cause digestive discomfort to those who are lactose-intolerant. As for soy, not only is it a common allergen but it may also slow down thyroid function and potentially lead to dreadful weight gain.

      Many protein powder formulations also contain artificial sweeteners and flavoring to mimic the taste of milkshakes. These artificial ingredients may cause uncomfortable side effects such as bloating and gas.

      Protein overload

      A three-ounce piece of meat contains about 21 grams of protein. Many people eat more than three ounces of meat in one sitting so they can easily meet the recommended protein requirement in one to two meals. Considering most protein powders contain 20 to 30 grams of protein per serving and given that most people are not endurance athletes, adding one or two servings a day can be extremely taxing to the body.

      Sources for this article include:

      http://www.nutraceuticalsworld.com

      http://www.jissn.com/content/4/1/8

      http://m.jn.nutrition.org/content/128/6/1051.full

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2129142/

      http://www.acidalkalinediet.net/

      http://www.consumerreports.org

      http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyon...s/protein.html


      Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041288_pr...#ixzz2ZmQnh7uz
      Comments 18 Comments
      1. 804's Avatar
        804 -
        Okay... now I've heard it all...
      1. huggy77's Avatar
        huggy77 -
        ahhh, fun comments incoming...
      1. mcc23's Avatar
        mcc23 -
        There should be a thicker filter for the articles AM posts on here
      1. THOR 70's Avatar
        THOR 70 -
        Next article title: "Is your testosterone too high?"
      1. theOCdude's Avatar
        theOCdude -
        Originally Posted by THOR 70 View Post
        Next article title: "Is your testosterone too high?"
        Lmao
      1. taman6886's Avatar
        taman6886 -
        I was told I needed to reduce my protein intake due to early stage kidney disease. That input came from a medical professional. When asked, she stated that she did not think the high protein intake I habitully ingested (250-300+g daily at that time) caused the damage, (this was attributed to type II diabetes) but rather that it would place further strain in my kidneys.
      1. CountryLiftin's Avatar
        CountryLiftin -
        Some people do eat too much protein. Look at guys like wendler who eat 1g or so per pound of BW and they are at the top. He eats way more carbs though. If you are natty I say 1g/lb is plenty .
      1. Axillist's Avatar
        Axillist -
        My favorite part of the article is
        "recommendation is 1.4 to 2.0 grams per pound of body weight which is about 0.6 to 0.9 grams per pound." I'm not an engineer but I'm pretty sure that statement makes no sense mathematically!
      1. GrizzlyLB50's Avatar
        GrizzlyLB50 -
        Originally Posted by Axillist View Post
        My favorite part of the article is
        "recommendation is 1.4 to 2.0 grams per pound of body weight which is about 0.6 to 0.9 grams per pound." I'm not an engineer but I'm pretty sure that statement makes no sense mathematically!
        It would be logical to conclude this was a typo and the first unit should be Kilogram, not pound, but as it is worded it does make no sense.
      1. jerrysiii's Avatar
        jerrysiii -
        So make sure you get your 50 gms of protein and then load up on whole grains. This must be best because the our government would never lie to us.

        Someone really needs to moderate the content of the article page. There are some good articles, but crap like this really has no business on this site.
      1. cloydcd's Avatar
        cloydcd -
        Originally Posted by Axillist View Post
        My favorite part of the article is
        "recommendation is 1.4 to 2.0 grams per pound of body weight which is about 0.6 to 0.9 grams per pound." I'm not an engineer but I'm pretty sure that statement makes no sense mathematically!
        I quit reading as soon as I read that.
      1. Admin's Avatar
        Admin -
        Originally Posted by jerrysiii View Post
        So make sure you get your 50 gms of protein and then load up on whole grains. This must be best because the our government would never lie to us.

        Someone really needs to moderate the content of the article page. There are some good articles, but crap like this really has no business on this site.


        Then write your own and we will put it up.
      1. Wrivest's Avatar
        Wrivest -
        Originally Posted by Admin View Post

        Then write your own and we will put it up.
        Ohhhhhhh snap!!!!!
      1. Admin's Avatar
        Admin -
        Not meant as a snap, just the truth. We don't write the articles. They are for you to like, criticize, whatever...we aren't an editorial board and authors don't want their work changed, no matter how awful people think it is.
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Wow; a new step in pseudoscience right there. Next they will be telling me that vegan-ism is super healthy. Check out the 4th source. That study specifically destroys the implication/agenda this article is trying to push.

        To Quote:
        "The purpose of this review is to evaluate the scientific validity of AHA Nutrition Committee's statement on dietary protein and weight reduction (St. Jeor ST et al. Circulation 2001;104:1869–1874), which states: "Individuals who follow these [high-protein] diets are risk for ... potential cardiac, renal, bone, and liver abnormalities overall. Simply stated, there is no scientific evidence whatsoever that high-protein intake has adverse effects on liver function. Relative to renal function, there are no data in the scientific literature demonstrating that healthy kidneys are damaged by the increased demands of protein consumed in quantities 2–3 times above the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)."

        There is absolutely no friggin way a high protein intake does anything but good to your system if your kidneys aren't shot. It's an absolutely fallacious claim. Period.
      1. mrmello's Avatar
        mrmello -
        Am I the only one who didn´t think the article was that bad? I didnt get so hung up on the ammount of protein one should eat but rather, on the consumer report lab analyses on 15 protein powders which contained traces of heavy metal. This was the main point of the article, not how many grams you are having. Whats bad for you is to consume 3 or more servings of these contaminants. Since it didn´t mention which ones were paticulary bad..I looked for that test and turns out these 3 were the most preocupying ones: EAS-Dark Chocolate RTD, Muscle Milk Vanilla and Muscle Milk chocolate both powder version.
      1. huggy77's Avatar
        huggy77 -
        i enjoy the awful articles... I know they will lead to everyone leaving funny comments...
      1. glpro's Avatar
        glpro -
        Originally Posted by Pandabear View Post
        Wow; a new step in pseudoscience right there. Next they will be telling me that vegan-ism is super healthy. Check out the 4th source. That study specifically destroys the implication/agenda this article is trying to push.

        To Quote:
        "The purpose of this review is to evaluate the scientific validity of AHA Nutrition Committee's statement on dietary protein and weight reduction (St. Jeor ST et al. Circulation 2001;104:1869–1874), which states: "Individuals who follow these [high-protein] diets are risk for ... potential cardiac, renal, bone, and liver abnormalities overall. Simply stated, there is no scientific evidence whatsoever that high-protein intake has adverse effects on liver function. Relative to renal function, there are no data in the scientific literature demonstrating that healthy kidneys are damaged by the increased demands of protein consumed in quantities 2–3 times above the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)."

        There is absolutely no friggin way a high protein intake does anything but good to your system if your kidneys aren't shot. It's an absolutely fallacious claim. Period.

        Whoop! there it is!

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