• Is When You Eat As Important As What?



      Jack Owoc Flex

      IS NUTRIENT TIMING BRO SCIENCE (BS)?

      Many self-proclaimed experts hiding behind their big screen computer monitors are claiming that “nutrient timing” is just pure “BS” or “Bro Science.” Nutrient timing is not BS! In fact, the truth is that nutrient timing with super creatines and super leucine peptide-based supplements and proteins are the future of muscle building!

      HOW DO WE GET BIGGER, FASTER, STRONGER, AND LEANER?

      There are secrets to radically increasing muscle protein synthesis (MPS) so that it’s far greater than protein breakdown. The secret to explosive muscle growth doesn’t just end here. The next step is to eliminate the threat of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) altogether!

      If you’re building more proteins than you’re breaking down, then ultimately you build more muscle. Research shows that you can more effectively turn on mTOR and MPS with multiple servings of whey protein. However, the combination of four servings of 20 grams of whey protein proved to be more effective than eight servings of 10 grams. Four servings of 20 grams also beat two servings of 40 grams of whey protein in turning on mTOR and MPS.

      In other words, there is a threshold for mTOR activation and, consequently, protein synthesis. This phenomenon is called protein threshold. Different proteins have different thresholds based on quality and leucine content. Whey protein is the most studied of all sportsnutrition proteins with 20–30 grams being optimal and 40 grams having only a slightly better effect on mTOR and MPS (myofbrillar protein synthesis) activation. Keep in mind that whey protein’s high leucine content is primarily what makes it so potent. Very recent (2014) research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that 25 grams of whey protein increased MPS by a whopping 267%. What was really cool was that this same study showed that just 6.25 grams of whey protein plus 5 grams of leucine increased MPS by 220%. I’m also privy to certain research that shows that you can add 3 grams of leucine to 30 grams of an inferior protein like hemp, rice, wheat, or pea to make these plant-based proteins pretty close to whey protein in its ability to increase myofbrillar protein synthesis.

      Make no mistake, 40 grams of whey protein is still superior to lesser amounts of protein. Consequently, this is precisely why I never take less than 40 grams of SRO Whey Protein Isolate. Do I stop there? No, whey! I’ll spike-stack 40 grams of SRO with my patented Creatyl-L-Leucine super creatine peptide and some super leucine peptides like leucine-L-leucine and leucine-L-isoleucine or simply add a huge spoon of CREmTOR.

      Special Note: Creatine and leucine have horrible solubility. What’s super cool is that the patented Creatyl-L-Leucine super creatine peptide is one of the most soluble of all creatines and it dissolves in just seconds when you stir it into water and even faster in stomach acid!

      There’s no doubt that every time you eat a meal with a suffcient amount of animal protein you’ll stimulate mTOR and consequently, MPS. Four meals are better than two meals, while six meals are more effective than four in activating the musclebuilding pathways and turning of muscle protein breakdown (MPB). - FLEX

      NUTRIENT TIMING SUPPLEMENT PROTOCOL & MEAL STRATEGY

      MEAL 1

      2 whole eggs (yolks included
      5 egg whites
      1 tsp almond butter
      1 cup broccoli

      MEAL 2

      6 oz chicken breast
      12 walnuts
      1 cup green beans

      MEAL 3

      8 oz grass-fed beef (90% protein/10% fat)
      6oz sweet potato
      1 tbsp thin fat

      MEAL 4

      6 oz wild fish (preferably wild salmon-no farm-raised fish
      1/2 avocado
      large green salad

      MEAL 5

      6 oz chicken breast
      10 walnuts
      1 cup cooked asparagus

      MEAL 6 (Optional)

      Protein Rush! RTD or
      2 scoops SRO Zero Carb Protein (can be used as a replacement for meal 1-5 or 6th meal)
      EXPLOSIVE MUSCLE GROWTH PROTOCOL

      PRE-WORKOUT

      mTORC1 or Shotgun 5X

      INTRA-WORKOUT

      2-3 scoops Fast 5

      POST-WORKOUT

      1 Carbonx RTD
      1 scoop CREmTOR
      2 1/2 scoops SRO Zero Carb

      - See more at: http://www.flexonline.com/nutrition/....WSgqLwDn.dpuf
      Comments 26 Comments
      1. Oscar's Avatar
        Oscar -
        Why does this read like a vpx ad
      1. asooneyeonig's Avatar
        asooneyeonig -
        Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
        Why does this read like a vpx ad
        cause its from Flex mega'adverti'zine
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        yeah this article (advertisement) is useless
      1. gg06mr's Avatar
        gg06mr -
        I was expecting the article to recommend 10-12 servings of 20-30 grams of protein spread out evenly throughout the day, with quite a few of those being whey, after how it opened up. Ironically, the recommended meal plan seemed to go against everything the article talked about.
      1. Helander's Avatar
        Helander -
        mTor is maxed out for up to five hours from eating a good meal including a nice amount of protein. By constantly getting more protein in you just numb your response.
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        mTor is maxed out for up to five hours from eating a good meal including a nice amount of protein. By constantly getting more protein in you just numb your response.

        Will sipping on BCAA's all day have the same effect as constantly eating protein?
      1. Thompson2003's Avatar
        Thompson2003 -
        So there's no mention of actually eating certain things at a certain time of day, just a poorly executed advertisement for crEmtor? This article is worse than worthless, thank u for wasting my time.
      1. Helander's Avatar
        Helander -
        Originally Posted by Gutterpump View Post
        Will sipping on BCAA's all day have the same effect as constantly eating protein?
        Constantly sipping BCAA:s seems to only be effective only when the quality/quantity of daily protein is severly restricted. For example a child in a third world country with half of his 12 brothers dead due to starvation would benefit from sipping BCAA:s constantly, but if your protein intake is on the level of a bodybuilder, there's no real use for this.

        Even fasting for 36 hours straight does not cause your body to break down muscle tissue, unless you're very lean (under ~10% bodyfat, and even then you'll get it all back with normalized calorie amounts in a couple of weeks)

        Lyle McD. says in his Protein Book that it might be of minor benefit to augment your slowly releasing meal with a fast-digesting protein like whey or BCAA hours after youhave eaten to spike mTor again, but the benefit is a very minor indeed if it exists at all.

        The bottom line from what I've read is to spike mTor, then let it settle (which it will do anyways) and then spike it again. Think of a "push-pull" method when picking up women. Brad Pilon mentioned in his EsE audio files that the longer the mTor has been unactivated, the more aggressive the response is when it is once again spiked up.
      1. krk1's Avatar
        krk1 -
        I thought the article was generally good with some decent citations to back the inductive reasoning. The promo aspect which hit me hard about the third paragraph up from the bottom has the appearance of being the original statement to peddle, and so the rest was stacked on top of it :)
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        Constantly sipping BCAA:s seems to only be effective only when the quality/quantity of daily protein is severly restricted. For example a child in a third world country with half of his 12 brothers dead due to starvation would benefit from sipping BCAA:s constantly, but if your protein intake is on the level of a bodybuilder, there's no real use for this.
        I do it because it makes my water taste good lol.. I love Xtend (BCAAs) / RPG (BCAA/EAA blend). And it definitely helps me drink far more water throughout the day.
      1. Helander's Avatar
        Helander -
        Originally Posted by Gutterpump View Post
        I do it because it makes my water taste good lol.. I love Xtend (BCAAs) / RPG (BCAA/EAA blend). And it definitely helps me drink far more water throughout the day.
        I also sometimes do it just to get more water down when at work. Surely, if it makes people drink more water, it is worth something.
      1. Oscar's Avatar
        Oscar -
        Gets kind of pricey doing that, just go with sugar free kool aid, unless money isn't an issue
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        I've been trying to squeeze limes into my water and just do that instead for a bit of flavor, definitely healthier that taking in so much aspartame from sugar free kool-aid, but I love Xtend and RPG so much, it's a bit of an addiction tbh. Using RPG all day is definitely expensive because of the EAA's. Such a good blend though with the freeze-dried berry extracts/powder they put in there.
      1. Vengeance187's Avatar
        Vengeance187 -
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        Even fasting for 36 hours straight does not cause your body to break down muscle tissue, unless you're very lean (under ~10% bodyfat, and even then you'll get it all back with normalized calorie amounts in a couple of weeks)
        This is incorrect. The body is always breaking down muscle in an anabolic:catabolic ratio. If anabolism is higher than catabolism, you build muscle. If catabolism is higher than anabolism, you lose muscle. It's as simple as that. I used to lose muscle when taking a week off from working out from not eating enough. I certainly didn't "fast"(besides the 8 hour fast called sleeping), so how did I lose the muscle if your claim is true? Now I stay in a calorie surplus when taking a break from working out just to maintain what muscle I've gained. You can't "stop" catabolism. You can lower it(sipping bcaa's may do this), or increase anabolism to make the ratio more favorable to building muscle. If you could stop muscle breakdown, damaged tissue would never get removed...
      1. Helander's Avatar
        Helander -
        Originally Posted by Vengeance187 View Post
        This is incorrect. The body is always breaking down muscle in an anabolic:catabolic ratio. If anabolism is higher than catabolism, you build muscle. If catabolism is higher than anabolism, you lose muscle. It's as simple as that. I used to lose muscle when taking a week off from working out from not eating enough. I certainly didn't "fast"(besides the 8 hour fast called sleeping), so how did I lose the muscle if your claim is true? Now I stay in a calorie surplus when taking a break from working out just to maintain what muscle I've gained. You can't "stop" catabolism. You can lower it(sipping bcaa's may do this), or increase anabolism to make the ratio more favorable to building muscle. If you could stop muscle breakdown, damaged tissue would never get removed...
        You are correct in terms that metabolism is not an on/off switch - There are anabolic and catabolic processes going an all the time in our body. Muscle growth is not possible without simultaneous muscle breakdown.

        However, the reason you lost muscle is that you stopped exercising. Strength training is the single biggest factor which prevents muscle loss. Short term fasting + regular exercise = no muscle loss. Short term fasting + no workout = muscle loss. Actually, sipping BCAA:s every two hours 24/7 + no exercise = muscle loss.

        You probably did not lose much muscle mass anyways, and probably most of it was just glycogen depletion. Also it needs to be noted that the more advanced the athlete, the more he will downgrade when taking a week off. A total n00b would not lose anything since he has nothing to lose. Some extremely high level athletes find their athletic ability drop with only two consecutive days off!

        Also, from a practical viewpoint muscle loss is something most people should not even think about. If you took a crash diet for two weeks without exercising at all, which would result in pretty "massive" muscle loss, you would gain it all back in terms of weeks due to muscle memory. (Edit: Obviously no-one does this kind of ****)The process is similar in nature as it is with weight loss: The average person will gain his lost fat back pretty quickly, because the fat cells get left in place while the fat content is removed. It is easy to fill an already built warehouse with stuff you know.

        Muscle cells also do not get destroyed when one experiences muscle loss (only in cases of near death starvation does body completely rid muscle cells). The muscle cells simply shrink and become inactive, and their potential can be easily restored with exercise and proper nutrition.
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        Hrm I tend to come back stronger when I take a week off to deload. I log all my workouts and I've noticed that in my numbers. I'm not sure if athletes would downgrade so easily. Maybe cardiovascular wise, I could see that. Just speaking from practical experience.
      1. Helander's Avatar
        Helander -
        Originally Posted by Gutterpump View Post
        Hrm I tend to come back stronger when I take a week off to deload. I log all my workouts and I've noticed that in my numbers. I'm not sure if athletes would downgrade so easily. Maybe cardiovascular wise, I could see that. Just speaking from practical experience.
        That is most surely correct. I also highly doubt most people would actually experience real muscle loss with one week off training, but if someone insists that they did, the only practical reason is that their bodies respond quickly to "non-stimulus" and downgrade their peak levels. With skill-based training the drop tends to be more aggressive. I do gymnastics as my main sport, and things such as handstand endurance drop pretty quick without constant, daily "reminders" for the body to keep the skill up.

        These things tend to be highly individual. On olympic level there are athletes who thrive on up to three workout sessions per day. There are some olympic athletes who get destroyed by two workout sessions per day. Still both compete at the same level.
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        That is most surely correct. I also highly doubt most people would actually experience real muscle loss with one week off training, but if someone insists that they did, the only practical reason is that their bodies respond quickly to "non-stimulus" and downgrade their peak levels. With skill-based training the drop tends to be more aggressive. I do gymnastics as my main sport, and things such as handstand endurance drop pretty quick without constant, daily "reminders" for the body to keep the skill up.

        These things tend to be highly individual. On olympic level there are athletes who thrive on up to three workout sessions per day. There are some olympic athletes who get destroyed by two workout sessions per day. Still both compete at the same level.

        Ahh yes, I was also going to mention that skill based training like gymnastics and olympic lifting would see a faster downgrade, since a lot of the work is CNS related. A skill based athlete could come back a bit 'rusty' from a break.
      1. Vengeance187's Avatar
        Vengeance187 -
        Originally Posted by Gutterpump View Post
        Hrm I tend to come back stronger when I take a week off to deload. I log all my workouts and I've noticed that in my numbers.
        That used to happen to me for the first few years of working out. Now I'm either the same strength or less after a break. I don't do deloads, I just take a week off, and sometimes more if on vacation. I don't know many other 165lbs guys that can bench 330lbs; that is, after I can get it back up there after a break. What sucks the most is losing a couple of years of progress in a couple of months from getting sick.
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        You are correct in terms that metabolism is not an on/off switch - There are anabolic and catabolic processes going an all the time in our body. Muscle growth is not possible without simultaneous muscle breakdown.......Muscle cells also do not get destroyed when one experiences muscle loss (only in cases of near death starvation does body completely rid muscle cells). The muscle cells simply shrink and become inactive, and their potential can be easily restored with exercise and proper nutrition.
        There are several different types of muscle cells. The cells are not part of the contractile tissue. Muscle tissue is absolutely broken down. Just making sure you realize your statement about muscle tissue not being broken down is incorrect.
        Also, from a practical viewpoint muscle loss is something most people should not even think about. If you took a crash diet for two weeks without exercising at all, which would result in pretty "massive" muscle loss, you would gain it all back in terms of weeks due to muscle memory.
        I personally have lost a lot of muscle, and it took me just as long to gain it back as it did the first time around. I've always been a hardgainer though, so it may be a special case.
        Originally Posted by Helander View Post
        mTor is maxed out for up to five hours from eating a good meal including a nice amount of protein. By constantly getting more protein in you just numb your response.
        It depends on the rate of amino acid appearance and clearing. In Lyle McDonal's study BCAA's 2 hours after a meal spiked MPS since it's high rate of appearance raised amino acid levels higher than the previous meal, but cleared the system fast enough that the next meal 2 hours later still increased MPS. The four hour blanket statement only applies to whole foods(I'm pretty sure it was four, not five, but I can't find the study now).
      1. Gutterpump's Avatar
        Gutterpump -
        Originally Posted by Vengeance187 View Post
        That used to happen to me for the first few years of working out. Now I'm either the same strength or less after a break. I don't do deloads, I just take a week off, and sometimes more if on vacation. I don't know many other 165lbs guys that can bench 330lbs; that is, after I can get it back up there after a break. What sucks the most is losing a couple of years of progress in a couple of months from getting sick.
        I hear ya. I do believe in muscle memory though and I do believe that strength can also be regained fast after a long break if you train right. For example, I had stopped deadlifting for a very very long time...so my numbers were pretty horrible. After not having deadlifted for over a year, I was able to get my 1RM to 450 within 2 months of following a simple but effective powerlifting routine and really pushing it every week. I never would've thought my #'s would jump so fast in such a short time.

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