Weight Gain From Quitting Smoking - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Weight Gain From Quitting Smoking



      From Science Daily

      Most smokers put on a couple of kilos when they quit smoking. This is not due to an increased calorie intake, but to a change in the composition of the intestinal flora after quitting smoking, as a study supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) suggests.

      When smokers wave goodbye to their cigarettes, eighty per cent of them put on seven kilos on average. Their weight increases even if their calorie intake remains the same or even falls compared to the level before quitting smoking. What is the reason for this weight gain?

      Researchers working with Gerhard Rogler of Zurich University Hospital attribute the cause to a changed composition of the bacterial diversity in the intestine. As they recently showed in a study in PLoS One, the bacterial strains that also prevail in the intestinal flora of obese persons take the upper hand in people giving up smoking.

      Comparison of stool samples

      Rogler and his colleagues of the Swiss IBD cohort study examined the genetic material of intestinal bacteria found in the faeces and studied stool samples which they had received from twenty different persons over a period of nine weeks -- four samples per person. The test persons included five non-smokers, five smokers and ten persons who had quit smoking one week after the start of the study.

      While the bacterial diversity in the faeces of smokers and non-smokers changed only little over time, giving up smoking resulted in the biggest shift in the composition of the microbial inhabitants of the intestines. The Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes fractions increased at the expense of representatives of the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla. At the same time, the test subjects who had quit smoking gained an average of 2.2 kilos in weight although their eating and drinking habits remained the same (with the exception that, towards the end of the study, they drank on average a little more alcohol than before quitting smoking).

      More efficient utilisation

      Their results reflected those seen in previous studies conducted with mice, says Rogler. When other scientists transplanted the faeces of obese mice into the intestines of normal-weight mice some years ago, they saw that both the fractions of the Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in the gut flora as well as the weight of the mice treated increased. The new gut flora apparently used the energy contained in the nutrition more efficiently.

      Rogler and his colleagues assume that the same effect also manifests itself in their test subjects. The composition of the diverse bacteria in the intestinal flora, which changes after giving up smoking, probably provides the body with more energy, resulting in new non-smokers gaining weight.

      Swiss IBD cohort study

      With the aim of gaining a better understanding of inflammatory bow-el diseases or IBD, specialist hospitals, private practice physicians and university institutions have come together to pool their knowledge. They are collecting the medical data of now nearly 2,000 affected persons who are participating in this long-term study.

      Story Source:
      The above story is based on materials provided by Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung.
      Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

      Journal Reference:
      Luc Biedermann, Jonas Zeitz, Jessica Mwinyi, Eveline Sutter-Minder, Ateequr Rehman, Stephan J. Ott, Claudia Steurer-Stey, Anja Frei, Pascal Frei, Michael Scharl, Martin J. Loessner, Stephan R. Vavricka, Michael Fried, Stefan Schreiber, Markus Schuppler, Gerhard Rogler. Smoking Cessation Induces Profound Changes in the Composition of the Intestinal Microbiota in Humans. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (3): e59260 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059260

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0829093032.htm
      Comments 6 Comments
      1. xigotmailx's Avatar
        xigotmailx -
        Cool information but how does this affect gains in the gym. Are you going to get fat gain or muscle gain from the change if you workout. Don't these scientists know that its all about the gains?
      1. edje007's Avatar
        edje007 -
        Originally Posted by xigotmailx View Post
        Cool information but how does this affect gains in the gym. Are you going to get fat gain or muscle gain from the change if you workout. Don't these scientists know that its all about the gains?
        I quit smoking about8 months ago....it's all about changing diet if you think your getting fatter.

        Biggest difference for me is, more endurance and a better pump...so glad I quit that shyt...was hard, but well worth it;)
      1. xigotmailx's Avatar
        xigotmailx -
        I'm saying if you already have a macro nutrient balanced diet for your weight, will you put on fat or muscle if you keep your diet in check and even update it for the new given weight *their average is 5 lbs*. 5 pounds also isn't very much in hindsight but 5 pounds of muscle vs fat has a huge difference in body comp and body fat % as well. Could this be the new "anabolic" lol, "quit smoking gain 5 pounds lean mass in a month" = new marketing strategy for the nicotine replacement companies
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        I think it's because of the carbon monoxide. Smoking keeps carbon monoxide really high in a smoker's blood, which basically depresses the entire body, including gut flora like they said, but also every other aspect of metabolism. So it's true, keeping the diet exactly the same people will gain weight. Whether it's muscle or fat depends on different things. In my case it was mostly muscle, but I changed my diet a lot & started bodybuilding when I quit. The figure of 5 lb is way low though, probably because it's not actually possible to keep the diet the same. I know several people who quit and they all gained at least 20 lb.
      1. xigotmailx's Avatar
        xigotmailx -
        Originally Posted by compudog View Post
        I think it's because of the carbon monoxide. Smoking keeps carbon monoxide really high in a smoker's blood, which basically depresses the entire body, including gut flora like they said, but also every other aspect of metabolism. So it's true, keeping the diet exactly the same people will gain weight. Whether it's muscle or fat depends on different things. In my case it was mostly muscle, but I changed my diet a lot & started bodybuilding when I quit. The figure of 5 lb is way low though, probably because it's not actually possible to keep the diet the same. I know several people who quit and they all gained at least 20 lb.
        Do you feel it would of been easier to gain more muscle if one has already been working out? Because I have been stuck around 190 and gaining weight is pretty hard. I've been thinking that it has been because of smoking. Therefore, with my gains mostly in mind and a goal of being 200+ within the year, I believe that quitting smoking may get me there. Going to be a tough experiment but I believe I can do it
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        Originally Posted by xigotmailx View Post
        Do you feel it would of been easier to gain more muscle if one has already been working out? Because I have been stuck around 190 and gaining weight is pretty hard. I've been thinking that it has been because of smoking. Therefore, with my gains mostly in mind and a goal of being 200+ within the year, I believe that quitting smoking may get me there. Going to be a tough experiment but I believe I can do it
        Definitely easier if you're already working out. In any case 10 lb of muscle in a year isn't an outrageous goal but smoking certainly won't help you get there.

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