Power Vs Strength - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Power Vs Strength



      By Mike Simone Men's Fitness

      For all of our fans who shoot us questions on our Twitter and Facebook pages, this one's for you. Each week, we tap into our pool of editors and experts to help with any questions or challenges you're having with your fitness regimen. This week, Tommy Caldwell, founder of Hybrid Health Corp. as well as host and creator of the Outlaws of Health radio show on iTunes, fields questions about the differences between training for strength and training for power.

      Q1: What’s the difference between power and strength?

      “Strength is the ability to move a certain amount of weight, where as power is the ability to move weight quickly. To give a simple example: Performing a deadlift involves a strong base of strength, whereas a movement like the snatch requires explosive power."


      Q2: What are the optimal exercises for building power? How many sets and reps?

      “Power development requires heavy weight, high sets, and low reps. It could be 4–5 sets of 3 reps, 5–6 sets of 1–2 reps, or up to 7–8 sets of a single rep. Prilepin’s Chart (based off of Russian research of Olympic lifting) is a good marker for those who don’t know how to control volume.”


      Q3: What are the benefits of training for power?

      “Aside from the fact that being optimally powerful makes you more badass——power is a crucial trait that allows athletes to jump high, hit hard, sprint fast, and makes them exciting to watch. Training for power develops the fast-twitch muscle fibers and the nervous system so they can generate all those explosive movements that make top-end athletes worth the money they’re paid.”


      Q4: Is there a way to train for power, strength and size at the same time?

      “If you’re a beginner or even a low-intermediate lifter, you can make gains in many areas at once through a process called periodization (the planned structure of your training regime used to dictate reaching certain goals at certain times). However, if you’re a high-intermediate to advanced lifter looking to get more powerful, just focus on that alone or you risk underdeveloping in many areas instead of making real gains in one. There are a ton of different periodization methods, so you’ll want to research them all and decide which one is most congruent with your specific goals.”


      Q5: What are the biggest mistakes people make when training for power?

      “The biggest mistake people make is adding too much volume and resting too little. When you’re lifting 1–2 reps at a time with up to 3–4 minutes of rest between sets you don’t develop the same muscle soreness or fatigue that you may be used to——therefore you might feel as though you aren’t working hard enough or that the training isn’t effective. Don’t get antsy and try to accelerate your results. Remember what your ultimate goal is and that power requires controlled volume, set rest, and being ‘fresh’ for every single pull.”

      Source: http://www.mensfitness.com/training/...er-performance
      Comments 3 Comments
      1. willymacmont's Avatar
        willymacmont -
        There must be a hyphen missing from between some of these numbers. 45 sets of 3? Can't be.
      1. bill1369's Avatar
        bill1369 -
        There is some good info in this article and I know 1 short piece cannot cover everything. But some basics might be good. For example, I have never really thought about my lifting but I have been lifting now about 25 years. Basically, I just wanted to remain strong while my contemporaries fell apart. So, I do 3 or 4 sets of everything with 8 to 12 reps. This article intrigued me about power. So, should I still warm up before every exercise? Now I do a warm up using about 50% of my max 10 or 12 rep lift. Is that still done in a power regime? What about body weight exercises - like pull ups or push ups? Still go balls out til you drop for 3 or 4 sets or are they off the plan? Any other advice???
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by bill1369 View Post
        There is some good info in this article and I know 1 short piece cannot cover everything. But some basics might be good. For example, I have never really thought about my lifting but I have been lifting now about 25 years. Basically, I just wanted to remain strong while my contemporaries fell apart. So, I do 3 or 4 sets of everything with 8 to 12 reps. This article intrigued me about power. So, should I still warm up before every exercise? Now I do a warm up using about 50% of my max 10 or 12 rep lift. Is that still done in a power regime? What about body weight exercises - like pull ups or push ups? Still go balls out til you drop for 3 or 4 sets or are they off the plan? Any other advice???

        Hi Bill,


        My advice would be to still warm up to prevent injury; "grease the groove" so to speak. Power training is very specific so I would focus on maybe 3 to possibly 5 exercises you want to increase power in. If you want to increase pull up explosive power I would focus on clap pulls and chins and variations there of. Levers are also very useful as well as "skin the cat" (it's an exercise, youtube it). Push up variations like clap pushups all the way to Thai pushups, triple claps and aztecs. I would start with clap pushups, move to thigh slaps and then advance to a superman pushup before doing Aztecs or Thai pushups, as I found them the hardest.


        Yes you can do it with additional weight, that's up to you. Keep the rest intervals long and the reps low and go for maximum acceleration. When assessing a power program it's important to have good mobility, so be sure to check your shoulder/scapula area is functioning properly; hip alignment is good and your feet and ankles move well. It's easy to injure yourself when something is out of balance and you attempt a full power movement. Happy hunting.

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