Are Post Workout Carbs Important? - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Are Post Workout Carbs Important?



      By Charles Poliquin Live

      Gaining muscle, losing fat, and getting stronger are best achieved with a few simple nutrition practices.

      You know you need amino acids after training, but do you know how much? Are straight amino acids better than a protein powder for repairing tissue? And what about carbohydrates? Do you need ‘em or will they blunt fat burning?

      New research provides some answers. First, after working out, it’s indicated to achieve a threshold dose of at least 10 grams of essential amino acids (EAAs) to support protein synthesis.

      Those 10 grams of EAAs can be gotten from a straight amino acid supplement or from whey protein. You could also eat a solid protein meal, but this will take significantly longer to digest than whey protein or amino acid capsules, so it would be more useful for the purpose of losing body fat than for muscle development goals.

      In addition, there is supplementation evidence that taking whey protein will maintain protein synthesis after training for the longest period. A study that compared protein synthesis during the 5 hours post-workout found that a 25-gram dose of whey, which provides about 13 grams of EAAs, was more effective than taking 6.25 grams of whey with added amino acids.

      But, the difference in protein synthesis from the two supplementation conditions wasn’t large, so if you are allergic to whey, taking straight amino acids is a smart choice.

      Second, are carbohydrates necessary?
      Theoretically, taking a carbohydrate supplement with protein can be beneficial because it may reduce cortisol levels and optimize the testosterone to cortisol ratio. However, if you consume food-based carbs in meals, supplementary carbs aren’t technically necessary to further stimulate protein synthesis over a protein supplement alone.

      This suggests if your primary goal is fat loss, ditch the carbs and stick with protein. If you’re trying to put on mass, or depleting glycogen with twice-a-day intense training, doing a supplement cycle with carbs and protein is the way to go.


      References:
      Kazemzadeh, Y., et al. Effects of Carbohydrate-Protein Intake During Exercise on Hormonal Changes and Muscular Strength After 12-Week Resistance training. Journal of Basic Applied Scientific Research. 2012. 2(6), 5945-5951.

      Churchward-Venne, T., Burd, N., et al. Supplementation of Suboptimal Protein Dose with Leucine or EAAs: Effects of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis at Rest and Following Resistance Exercise in Men. Journal of Physiology, 2012. Published Ahead of Print.


      Source: http://www.poliquingroup.com/Tips/ta...Essential.aspx
      Comments 12 Comments
      1. Whacked's Avatar
        Whacked -
        Nice pithy article
      1. wiseman's Avatar
        wiseman -
        Muscles 70% glycogen and 22-25% protein.

        Carbs> protein
      1. JReinhal's Avatar
        JReinhal -
        Another excellent article by Charles Poliquin!
      1. GetSwoll22's Avatar
        GetSwoll22 -
        I definitely notice the difference when I have a good quality weight gainer shake after my workout opposed to what I don't, but I do prefer to eat my carbs instead of drink them.
      1. cbsharpe's Avatar
        cbsharpe -
        My body responds well to carbs after working out. Everyone's makeup is entirely different. Gotta do what's best for you.
      1. alcs's Avatar
        alcs -
        Originally Posted by wiseman View Post
        Muscles 70% glycogen and 22-25% protein.

        Carbs> protein
        What's that bs with 70% glycogen?!?!
      1. wiseman's Avatar
        wiseman -
        Originally Posted by alcs View Post
        What's that bs with 70% glycogen?!?!
        Bs? You serious? Guess you haven't studied human physiology much. Our muscles are composed of primarily water. Glycogen is what stores the water in our muscles.
      1. alcs's Avatar
        alcs -
        Water is not glycogen though.it's a little bit over 1% of the muscle mass.claiming that water equals glycogen proves how much human physiology you have studied
      1. wiseman's Avatar
        wiseman -
        Originally Posted by alcs View Post
        Water is not glycogen though.it's a little bit over 1% of the muscle mass.claiming that water equals glycogen proves how much human physiology you have studied
        Without glycogen muscles would not store water lol which is why people who do low carb diets mainly lose water weight. Pretty simple.
      1. noahneng's Avatar
        noahneng -
        Originally Posted by wiseman View Post
        Muscles 70% glycogen and 22-25% protein.

        Carbs> protein
        Hi Wiseman,

        Do you have a source for that? I am no expert on this topic, but I did a quick Google search for "Muscle percent glycogen" and found on the 1st page of results 3 sources that claim glycogen makes up only 1% to 2% of muscle:

        1. "Approximately 400 g of glycogen make up one to two percent of the fresh weight of resting muscle”
        Biochemistry
        By Pamela C. Champe, Richard A. Harvey, Denise R. Ferrie
        books.google.com.hk/books?id=M_YOW50cg9oC&pg=PA123 &lpg=PA123&dq=Muscle+percent+g lycogen&********bl&ots=ilJQGeA cKf&sig=msrp1E0x_psSGU1BI3WQkv ib8E0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NSI1U9eiOK WeiAe4hICIDw&ved=0CE8Q6AEwBQ#v =onepage&q=percent&f=false[/url]
        Page 124.

        2. "In the muscles, glycogen is found in a low concentration (1-2% of the muscle mass)."
        wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycogen[/url]

        3. "The muscles can store about 1 - 2 percent in glycogen"
        ezinearticles.com/?Glycogen---What-Is-It?&id=1114436[/url]

        Thanks
      1. noahneng's Avatar
        noahneng -
        Originally Posted by wiseman View Post
        Muscles 70% glycogen and 22-25% protein.

        Carbs> protein
        Hi Wiseman,

        Do you have a source for that? I am no expert on this topic, but I did a quick Google search for "Muscle percent glycogen" and found on the 1st page of results 3 sources that claim glycogen makes up only 1% to 2% of muscle:

        1. "Approximately 400 g of glycogen make up one to two percent of the fresh weight of resting muscle”
        Biochemistry
        By Pamela C. Champe, Richard A. Harvey, Denise R. Ferrie
        books.google.com.hk/books?id=M_YOW50cg9oC&pg=PA123 &lpg=PA123&dq=Muscle+percent+g lycogen&********bl&ots=ilJQGeA cKf&sig=msrp1E0x_psSGU1BI3WQkv ib8E0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NSI1U9eiOK WeiAe4hICIDw&ved=0CE8Q6AEwBQ#v =onepage&q=percent&f=false[/url]
        Page 124.

        2. "In the muscles, glycogen is found in a low concentration (1-2% of the muscle mass)."
        wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycogen[/url]

        3. "The muscles can store about 1 - 2 percent in glycogen"
        ezinearticles.com/?Glycogen---What-Is-It?&id=1114436[/url]

        Thanks
      1. wiseman's Avatar
        wiseman -
        Originally Posted by noahneng View Post

        Hi Wiseman,

        Do you have a source for that? I am no expert on this topic, but I did a quick Google search for "Muscle percent glycogen" and found on the 1st page of results 3 sources that claim glycogen makes up only 1% to 2% of muscle:

        1. "Approximately 400 g of glycogen make up one to two percent of the fresh weight of resting muscle”
        Biochemistry
        By Pamela C. Champe, Richard A. Harvey, Denise R. Ferrie
        books.google.com.hk/books?id=M_YOW50cg9oC&pg=PA123 &lpg=PA123&dq=Muscle+percent+g lycogen&********bl&ots=ilJQGeA cKf&sig=msrp1E0x_psSGU1BI3WQkv ib8E0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NSI1U9eiOK WeiAe4hICIDw&ved=0CE8Q6AEwBQ#v =onepage&q=percent&f=false[/url]
        Page 124.

        2. "In the muscles, glycogen is found in a low concentration (1-2% of the muscle mass)."
        wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycogen[/url]

        3. "The muscles can store about 1 - 2 percent in glycogen"
        ezinearticles.com/?Glycogen---What-Is-It?&id=1114436[/url]

        Thanks
        You're right in a sense. The glycogen is a small percentage but it's side effect is the retention of water that holds the water in the muscle. Muscles are mainly water and glycogen is what retains it.

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