Obese Patients Trust Fat Doctors More - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Obese Patients Trust Fat Doctors More


      From Science Daily

      When it comes to taking diet advice from a physician -- size matters. This is according to a new study led by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who examined the impact of primary care physician BMI (body mass index) on their patients' trust and perceptions of weight-related stigma. They found that overweight and obese patients trust weight-related counseling from overweight physicians more than normal weight physicians and patients seeing an obese primary care physician were more likely to perceive weight-related stigma.

      The results are featured online in the June 2013 issue of Preventive Medicine.

      "With respect to overall trust, our results suggest that overweight and obese patients trust their primary care physicians, regardless of their body weight," said Sara Bleich, PhD, associate professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of Health Policy and Management. "However, with respect to trust in weight-related advice, we found that patients more strongly trusted diet advice from overweight primary care physicians as compared to normal BMI primary care physicians. In addition, we found that patient perceptions of weight-related stigma increased with physician BMI. Patients seeing obese primary care physicians, as compared to normal BMI physicians, were significantly more likely to report feeling judged because of their weight."

      Using a national cross-section survey of 600 overweight and obese patients, researchers examined overall trust and trust in weight-related counseling from their primary care physicians. Overall trust was assessed by asking, "Using any number from 0 to 10, where 0 means that you do not trust this doctor at all and 10 means that you trust this doctor completely, what number would you use to rate how much you trust this doctor?" While, trust in weight-related advice was assessed by the survey question: "How much do you trust the advice from this doctor about how to control your weight; improve your diet or increase your physical activity, a great deal; a good amount; only some or very little?" Bleich and colleagues conducted multivariate regression analyses to determine whether trust or perceived stigma differed by physician BMI.

      "While weight-related stigma has been documented among health professionals for decades, as well as lower physician respect towards patients with a higher BMI, our finding that weight-related stigma increases with physician BMI was quite surprising," notes Bleich. "Recent changes to obesity coverage among the publicly insured makes understanding primary care physicians' barriers to providing effective obesity care critical. Existing research suggests that primary care physicians face numerous challenges to providing optimal obesity care which include knowledge deficits, negative attitudes and structural barriers. Future research should further examine the impact of physician BMI on obesity care. In particular, why patient-perceived physician stigma is higher among heavier primary care physicians and why the patterns we observed between physician BMI and trust in weight-related counseling differ by the type of counseling."

      Story Source:
      The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, via Newswise.
      Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

      Journal Reference:
      Sara N. Bleich, Kimberly A. Gudzune, Wendy L. Bennett, Marian P. Jarlenski, Lisa A. Cooper. How does physician BMI impact patient trust and perceived stigma? Preventive Medicine, 2013; DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.05.005

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...Weight+Loss%29
      Comments 9 Comments
      1. ponysteak's Avatar
        ponysteak -
        Solution: If your BF% isn't below a certain point, you shouldn't receive healthcare. You should be left to die or lose the weight and stop being a burden on society. Why should we pay for your problems that you yourself caused? Obese people are bringing us ALL down. They cost more money in every way, plain and simple. They consume more resources, use more healthcare, and we have to keep re-engineering things so their fat asses can use it. All healthcare and law enforcement professionals should also have to keep their fat down and if they don't their jobs should be taken away. I feel so secure every time I see fat police officers. It's a ****ing joke.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        The military does it so we know it can be done...
      1. Rdcopps's Avatar
        Rdcopps -
        Is anyone really surprised by this article?!? Of course obese people find trust and comfort from another obese person (Dr.) just like fit and in-shape people tend to gravitate towards fit and in-shape people. It's human nature. 600 people is an extremely small sample considering the enormous (pun intended) obesity epidemic in this country, but I would think you would see similar results if the sample were larger (no pun here).
      1. actionhero's Avatar
        actionhero -
        As a former obese person and having many family and friends that are obese..the majority of fat people feel like skinny or in shape people don't understand what it's like to be overweight therefore won't know how to deal with it.. It makes no sense obviously since a doctor doesn't have to have to have a broken leg to understand how to treat it.

        The flip of the coin however is that many doctors don't understand diet and nutrition.

        ponysteaks comments are obviously ridiculous though. Obesity, alcoholism, diabetes, drug addictions.. etc are all self inflicted problems. Does that mean none of these people should receive healthcare? I'm not talking about free healthcare as I don't believe in it.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by actionhero View Post
        As a former obese person and having many family and friends that are obese..the majority of fat people feel like skinny or in shape people don't understand what it's like to be overweight therefore won't know how to deal with it.. It makes no sense obviously since a doctor doesn't have to have to have a broken leg to understand how to treat it.

        The flip of the coin however is that many doctors don't understand diet and nutrition.

        ponysteaks comments are obviously ridiculous though. Obesity, alcoholism, diabetes, drug addictions.. etc are all self inflicted problems. Does that mean none of these people should receive healthcare? I'm not talking about free healthcare as I don't believe in it.
        And it seems the most common advice we see these days is huge caloric deficits rather than finding a balance between caloric reductions and expenditures. Its funny really. People that are 250lbs eating 2800 calories per day think the best option is to cut down to 1500 calories in order to lose weight, not realizing the metabolic consequences involved. Truth is, most fat people dont eat enough!

        People are still adhering to this seemingly logical, yet misleading concept that "calories in/calories out" is all that matters and to lose fat means to be in deficit. We gotta bust that myth one soul at a time...
      1. Rdcopps's Avatar
        Rdcopps -
        This problem runs parallel to almost all other problems in society. It's like poverty. You can't cure poverty by giving poor people money. It doesn't work. You can't cure obesity by saying "eat less". You have to educate, so the people effected can see why what they are doing doesn't work and why a successful approach will. Once people understand, chances of "buy-in" is that much greater.
      1. trn450's Avatar
        trn450 -
        Physicians aren't dieticians or nutritionists, that's true. But a thin, fit physician surely knows a thing or two about physical activity and portion control. For the vast majority of Americans they could simply go for walks and start a caloric restriction diet program and move into a much more healthy BMI rnage.

        The fact that obese patients trust obese doctors more tells me just how far we've got our collective heads in the sand. That's phenomenally stupid.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by Rdcopps View Post
        This problem runs parallel to almost all other problems in society. It's like poverty. You can't cure poverty by giving poor people money. It doesn't work. You can't cure obesity by saying "eat less". You have to educate, so the people effected can see why what they are doing doesn't work and why a successful approach will. Once people understand, chances of "buy-in" is that much greater.
        I agree. I was actually using that same argument between the poor and the rich just yesterday, that the only thing that separates them is education. More so, this applies to all things including areas of town (whether they are wealthy and safe) and obesity vs. lean.

        It all goes back to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. If you aren't safe and can't obtain the most basic needs, you can never move beyond and accomplish greater things, establish greater relationship, etc. One of the most effective ways to raise someone (or even an entire culture) further up the Maslow diagram is to educate them. Good post.
      1. Misfit28's Avatar
        Misfit28 -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        And it seems the most common advice we see these days is huge caloric deficits rather than finding a balance between caloric reductions and expenditures. Its funny really. People that are 250lbs eating 2800 calories per day think the best option is to cut down to 1500 calories in order to lose weight, not realizing the metabolic consequences involved. Truth is, most fat people dont eat enough!

        People are still adhering to this seemingly logical, yet misleading concept that "calories in/calories out" is all that matters and to lose fat means to be in deficit. We gotta bust that myth one soul at a time...
        So true, repped :)