Liver Created Fructose Causes Insulin Resistance - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Liver Created Fructose Causes Insulin Resistance



      From Science Daily

      Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine reported today that the cause of obesity and insulin resistance may be tied to the fructose your body makes in addition to the fructose you eat.

      In recent years the role of added sweeteners, such as high fructose corn syrup and table sugar (sucrose), has taken center stage as risk factors for obesity and insulin resistance. Numerous studies suggest that the risk from added sugars may be due to the fructose content.

      But in the study published in the Sept. 10 edition of Nature Communications, the team led by researchers at the CU School of Medicine reports that fatty liver and insulin resistance may also result from fructose produced in the liver from non-fructose containing carbohydrates.

      The study, whose first authors are Miguel Lanaspa, PhD, and Takuji Ishimoto, MD, reported that mice can convert glucose to fructose in the liver, and that this conversion was critical for driving the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice fed glucose.

      "Our data suggests that it is the fructose generated from glucose that is largely responsible for how carbohydrates cause fatty liver and insulin resistance," said Lanaspa.

      Richard Johnson, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the division of renal diseases and hypertension at the School of Medicine and senior author of the paper, said: "Our studies provide an understanding for why high glycemic foods may increase the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. While some of the weight gain is driven by the caloric content and the effects of stimulating insulin, the ability of high glycemic foods to cause insulin resistance and fatty liver is due in part to the conversion of glucose to fructose inside the body.

      "Ironically, our study shows that much of the risk from ingesting high glycemic foods is actually due to the generation of fructose, which is a low glycemic sugar. These studies challenge the dogma that fructose is safe and that it is simply the high glycemic carbohydrates that need to be restricted."

      Story Source:
      The above story is based on materials provided by University of Colorado Denver, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.
      Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

      Journal Reference:
      Miguel A. Lanaspa, Takuji Ishimoto, Nanxing Li, Christina Cicerchi, David J. Orlicky, Philip Ruzicky, Christopher Rivard, Shinichiro Inaba, Carlos A. Roncal-Jimenez, Elise S. Bales, Christine P. Diggle, Aruna Asipu, J. Mark Petrash, Tomoki Kosugi, Shoichi Maruyama, Laura G. Sanchez-Lozada, James L. McManaman, David T. Bonthron, Yuri Y. Sautin, Richard J. Johnson. Endogenous fructose production and metabolism in the liver contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. Nature Communications, 2013; 4 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3434

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0910142341.htm
      Comments 8 Comments
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Bout freggin' time this board posts something that I've been preaching for a while now.

        There are several studies out there that date back to the 80's and 90's that spell out the detriment of fructose in the diet, this actually being one of those topics.

        Granted, it wont take but a few short minutes before fruit advocates come in and argue "but its got nutrients"... so does vegetables and OTC vitamins lol.
      1. exrugger's Avatar
        exrugger -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        Bout freggin' time this board posts something that I've been preaching for a while now.

        There are several studies out there that date back to the 80's and 90's that spell out the detriment of fructose in the diet, this actually being one of those topics.

        Granted, it wont take but a few short minutes before fruit advocates come in and argue "but its got nutrients"... so does vegetables and OTC vitamins lol.
        Completely agree, although fruit is beneficial it should be a treat or part of a cheat meal to really lean up (with exception of the few low carb fruits like rasberries and blackberries). I remember years ago going to vitamin shop and they tried to tell me I could eat one type of protein bar bc it only had 3g net carbs and I was on a low carb diet. In reality it was 20g of sugar with like 17g of fiber added (net meaning total grams of carbs subtract grams of fiber). I then told the salesperson if I got a glazed donut with 35 grams of carbs and injected it with 33grams of beneful if it would be acceptable on my low carb diet lol. Bottom line is a carb is a carb and they should primarily be utilized pre and post workout...
      1. j4ever41's Avatar
        j4ever41 -
        what your stance on eating fruit bro?
        1. Don't eat at all
        2. Eat in small amounts
        3. Eat in moderate amounts
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by exrugger View Post
        Completely agree, although fruit is beneficial it should be a treat or part of a cheat meal to really lean up (with exception of the few low carb fruits like rasberries and blackberries). I remember years ago going to vitamin shop and they tried to tell me I could eat one type of protein bar bc it only had 3g net carbs and I was on a low carb diet. In reality it was 20g of sugar with like 17g of fiber added (net meaning total grams of carbs subtract grams of fiber). I then told the salesperson if I got a glazed donut with 35 grams of carbs and injected it with 33grams of beneful if it would be acceptable on my low carb diet lol. Bottom line is a carb is a carb and they should primarily be utilized pre and post workout...
        Agreed. I perceive fruit as "Nature's Candy"
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by j4ever41 View Post
        what your stance on eating fruit bro?
        1. Don't eat at all
        2. Eat in small amounts
        3. Eat in moderate amounts
        During contest prep = 1. Don't eat at all

        During bulk = 2 or 3 but preferably 2.

        Fructose does not do a good job replenishing muscle glycogen. I'd rather have standard sugars like maltodextrin because a much greater percentage of those types go to the muscle first. A majority of fructose gets converted into fatty acids, which then go to fat cells. This is especially true when you are already in a caloric surplus.

        But because I'm an ecto, it isn't a big deal for me when bulking. If I were fat, however, I'd avoid it like the plague.
      1. exrugger's Avatar
        exrugger -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post

        During contest prep = 1. Don't eat at all

        During bulk = 2 or 3 but preferably 2.

        Fructose does not do a good job replenishing muscle glycogen. I'd rather have standard sugars like maltodextrin because a much greater percentage of those types go to the muscle first. A majority of fructose gets converted into fatty acids, which then go to fat cells. This is especially true when you are already in a caloric surplus.

        But because I'm an ecto, it isn't a big deal for me when bulking. If I were fat, however, I'd avoid it like the plague.
        100percent agree with this
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        Bout freggin' time this board posts something that I've been preaching for a while now.

        There are several studies out there that date back to the 80's and 90's that spell out the detriment of fructose in the diet, this actually being one of those topics.

        Granted, it wont take but a few short minutes before fruit advocates come in and argue "but its got nutrients"... so does vegetables and OTC vitamins lol.
        Although I agree with you that fructose is the last place you should be looking to refuel this particular study has to do with glucose being converted to fructose in the liver causing pre-cursers to metabolic syndrome such as diabetes.

        The full study can be found here: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/13...comms3434.html

        Although glucose in high amounts causes issues especially in sedentary people, glucose is perfectly fine for people who are active, which I think you agree with. To quote: "High serum glucose concentrations are known to induce the polyol pathway and increase fructose generation in the liver."

        Just to clarify so that people aren't thinking that this is specifically relating to fructose consumption in the die, because it isn't, it's relating to glucose saturation.

        Hope that was helpful.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by Pandabear View Post
        Although I agree with you that fructose is the last place you should be looking to refuel this particular study has to do with glucose being converted to fructose in the liver causing pre-cursers to metabolic syndrome such as diabetes.

        The full study can be found here: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/13...comms3434.html

        Although glucose in high amounts causes issues especially in sedentary people, glucose is perfectly fine for people who are active, which I think you agree with. To quote: "High serum glucose concentrations are known to induce the polyol pathway and increase fructose generation in the liver."

        Just to clarify so that people aren't thinking that this is specifically relating to fructose consumption in the die, because it isn't, it's relating to glucose saturation.

        Hope that was helpful.
        Yes, it was. Thanks man

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