• L-Citrulline Reduces Abdominal Fat



      From Ergo Log

      Supplementation with the amino acid L-citrulline can reduce the amount of abdominal fat. Molecular researchers at the Universite Paris Descartes will soon publish an article on this in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. If the French researchers have got the right end of the stick, then L-citrulline may help people with an apple-shaped body to acquire a pear-shaped body.

      Belly fat
      If you tend to put on fat in the abdominal area you're doubly unlucky. Belly fat or, as physiologists prefer to call it, visceral fat, increases the chance of heart attacks and diabetes, and it's a disaster for your figure too: 'apples' are regarded as less attractive than 'pears'.

      Whether you're an 'apple' or a 'pear' depends on your hormonal balance, and also your age. The older you are, the more easily you accumulate fat in your abdominal cavity. The French researchers wondered whether L-citrulline could reduce age-associated abdominal fat deposition. Researchers who had given older lab animals L-citrulline had sometimes reported this effect. [J Nutr. 2007 Dec;137(12):2680-5.]

      L-Citrulline & Fat
      The researchers gave young and old rats a hefty dose of L-citrulline daily for three months. At the end of the experimental period the researchers examined samples of visceral fat tissue from the animals, and compared these with tissue from rats of the same age that had not been given L-citrulline.

      In the old rats L-citrulline boosted the secretion of free fatty acids [NEFA] and glycerol from the visceral fat cells. That means that the visceral fat cells release their contents more easily into the bloodstream so that the body can burn them.



      At the same time L-citrulline reduced the speed with which the visceral fat cells stores nutrients as fat. The amino acid reduced the flux and reduced the effect of the enzyme cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase or PEPCK-C. This probably happened as a result of L-citrulline sabotaging the functioning of the fat sensor PPAR-gamma in the visceral fat cells.



      The inhibition of growth processes in visceral fat cells also took place in the young rats.

      Conclusion
      "This metabolic action of L-citrulline in the young rat could be a mechanism to limit lipid storage and to facilitate fat burning", the researchers write. "In advanced age, fat depots are redistributed, leading to an increased ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat mass. The L-citrulline-induced reduction of fat deposit in visceral adipose tissue could prevent this increase in ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat, and hence limit the associated pathological risks (e.g. diabetes, cardiovascular diseases) related to aging."

      "In obesity, the rise in adipose tissue mass also affects predominantly visceral fat, and L-citrulline effects in this pathophysiological situation remain an open question."

      Source:
      Mol Nutr Food Res. 2014 Jun 10. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201400053. [Epub ahead of print].

      Source: http://www.ergo-log.com/l-citrulline...into-pear.html
      Comments 7 Comments
      1. chris223's Avatar
        chris223 -
        Good enough for me
      1. jonnypsavas's Avatar
        jonnypsavas -
        "A hefty dose"? Meaning they have a mouse around 5 grams l-citrulline. That's like giving a human over 100 grams
      1. 98FATBOY's Avatar
        98FATBOY -
        Love to see the dosage amount. I will now brush my teeth with this amino
      1. cbsharpe's Avatar
        cbsharpe -
        I will not only brush my teeth, but actually take a bath in this stuff! LOL!
      1. Another_Hero's Avatar
        Another_Hero -
        Originally Posted by jonnypsavas View Post
        "A hefty dose"? Meaning they have a mouse around 5 grams l-citrulline. That's like giving a human over 100 grams
        Bingo.
      1. cranky frank's Avatar
        cranky frank -
        Guys check where you get it from

        Some shipments of L-citrulline, an amino acid supplement used to treat genetic disorders in children, can cause serious harm and in some cases could lead to death.

        L-citrulline is a dietary supplement that increases levels of citrulline in the body. Citrulline, an amino acid, occurs naturally and aids in the body’s urea cycle, the process that clears ammonia – a byproduct of normal metabolism – out of one’s system.

        Physicians can prescribe these supplements — sold as tablets, capsules, liquids and powders – to help treat certain genetic disorders and a variety of other illnesses. Without a prescription, consumers can take over-the-counter versions of the supplements. The most common over-the-counter users today are bodybuilders and athletes who want to boost their endurance.



        Because citrulline is created by the body, L-citrulline supplements are generally believed to be safe. Side effects are rare with the use of either pharmaceutical-grade or over-the-counter supplements. However, doctors advise women who are pregnant or nursing to avoid taking them. Scientific evidence about the supplements’ safety for women in these conditions is lacking.

        L-citrulline may interact with some prescription drugs, including certain medications used to treat hypertension, cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction. Individuals who take medications regularly, either prescription or over-the-counter, should consult a health care professional before taking L-citrulline.
        Bad Lots Spur Recall

        In February 2014, some pharmaceutical-grade L-citrulline supplements were recalled. Medisca Inc., a Plattsburg, N.Y.- based compounding firm, issued a voluntary recall of eight defective lots of its L-citrulline products, which are distributed to hospitals and pharmacies nationwide. According to a safety alert released by the FDA, these bad lots were found to contain no L-citrulline at all.

        Instead, FDA lab testing found that they contained N-acetyl-leucine, a drug used in the treatment of vertigo. Adverse reactions, some of them serious, have been reported in a number of children treated with these mislabeled supplements.

        The FDA advises health care professionals, caregivers and patients that Medisca L-citrulline products with the following lot numbers should not be used:

        95482/A
        95482/B
        95482/C
        95482/D
        96453/A
        96453/B
        96453/C
        96453/D

        Additionally, patients using L-citrulline who have concerns should contact their health care provider, and any adverse reactions or quality problems should be reported to MedWatch, the FDA’s safety information and adverse event reporting program.
      1. Another_Hero's Avatar
        Another_Hero -
        Originally Posted by cranky frank View Post
        Guys check where you get it from

        Some shipments of L-citrulline, an amino acid supplement used to treat genetic disorders in children, can cause serious harm and in some cases could lead to death.

        L-citrulline is a dietary supplement that increases levels of citrulline in the body. Citrulline, an amino acid, occurs naturally and aids in the body's urea cycle, the process that clears ammonia - a byproduct of normal metabolism - out of one's system.

        Physicians can prescribe these supplements -- sold as tablets, capsules, liquids and powders - to help treat certain genetic disorders and a variety of other illnesses. Without a prescription, consumers can take over-the-counter versions of the supplements. The most common over-the-counter users today are bodybuilders and athletes who want to boost their endurance.

        Because citrulline is created by the body, L-citrulline supplements are generally believed to be safe. Side effects are rare with the use of either pharmaceutical-grade or over-the-counter supplements. However, doctors advise women who are pregnant or nursing to avoid taking them. Scientific evidence about the supplements' safety for women in these conditions is lacking.

        L-citrulline may interact with some prescription drugs, including certain medications used to treat hypertension, cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction. Individuals who take medications regularly, either prescription or over-the-counter, should consult a health care professional before taking L-citrulline.
        Bad Lots Spur Recall

        In February 2014, some pharmaceutical-grade L-citrulline supplements were recalled. Medisca Inc., a Plattsburg, N.Y.- based compounding firm, issued a voluntary recall of eight defective lots of its L-citrulline products, which are distributed to hospitals and pharmacies nationwide. According to a safety alert released by the FDA, these bad lots were found to contain no L-citrulline at all.

        Instead, FDA lab testing found that they contained N-acetyl-leucine, a drug used in the treatment of vertigo. Adverse reactions, some of them serious, have been reported in a number of children treated with these mislabeled supplements.

        The FDA advises health care professionals, caregivers and patients that Medisca L-citrulline products with the following lot numbers should not be used:

        95482/A
        95482/B
        95482/C
        95482/D
        96453/A
        96453/B
        96453/C
        96453/D

        Additionally, patients using L-citrulline who have concerns should contact their health care provider, and any adverse reactions or quality problems should be reported to MedWatch, the FDA's safety information and adverse event reporting program.
        Source?

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