How To Tell A Personal Trainer Sucks - AnabolicMinds.com
    • How To Tell A Personal Trainer Sucks


      by Chris Giblin Men's Fitness

      You’re finally going to dish out cash for some extra motivation and guidance in the gym? Here’s how to make sure you’re really getting your money’s worth.

      Make sure you’re really getting your money’s worth.

      If you need motivation to work out or are trying to get over a training hump, a personal trainer can help. He or she can evaluate your abilities and goals and create a program that works for you, while providing some guidance and accountability. (Think about it: Who wants to waste time in the gym if you’re paying extra for it?)

      But if you just got a trainer or are in the market for one, beware. There are a few telltale signs that point to lack of experience—and recognizing them can help you maximize your results (and money) while avoiding frustration and injury. Click through to find out what they are.

      This is the biggie. Even if you like a trainer upon meeting him, he comes with glowing recommendations from your buddies, or he’s ripped beyond belief, don’t run up and make yourself his next client just yet. Simply ask about his qualifications. Is he certified by a reputable organization, like the American Council on Exercise or the American Fitness Professionals & Associates? Their programs ensure all certified trainers been taught properly and know all the right techniques.

      As personal trainer Mike Duffy puts it, “Many trainers do not have any nutritional training yet give out nutritional advice as though they’re an expert.” So unless he can prove he’s qualified (think: credentials), be wary of a trainer who is pushing you hard on tons of energy drinks, supplements, or shakes. A good trainer won’t step up as a nutrition authority unless he actually is—he’ll simply encourage you to find what works for you or share his personal experiences, saying things like, “This is what does it for me.”

      A trainer should show you how to do each exercise properly, plain and simple. Because if you don’t have the right technique, you won’t just risk injury—you’ll also miss out on the engaging all the right muscles, which means lousy results. Make sure your trainer is going into detail about how to do every new exercise, using both words and physical demonstrations. “If your trainer is not explaining how to squat when you’re squatting or how to breathe properly while performing ab work, that’s a bad sign,” says Duffy.

      Every body and mind is different, meaning to reach your goal—whether that’s running a marathon or looking cut—you need a plan personalized to you. “An experienced trainer will constantly ask questions to delve deep into what the client wants to get out of the exercise program,” says Duffy. So if you see hear trainer telling a few different people to do similar workouts, it’s not a good sign. In short: “If a trainer doesn’t assess you from the start, don’t hire him,” says Greg Robins, a strength and conditioning coach at Cressey Performance in Hudson, MA.

      If a trainer goes through his clients in a number of months or even weeks, it’s a clue into how much he struggles to motivate them and bring in the results they’re after. So Duffy recommends that you simply ask a potential trainer about his longest-lasting clients. “An experienced trainer will say they have clients for 5, 10, 15 or 20 years,” he says. This is a great way to find out how long the guy’s been around—and it also shows how effective his training style is.

      The stereotype of a personal trainer as no-excuses, mean-spirited hardass? It could help you in some cases, but most people have better experiences with a trainer who is firm, but keeps a good attitude and exhibits a positive, strong, pro-active energy. Because think about it: If you’re already getting a trainer, you’re motivated on some level—and don’t need someone screaming at you or putting you down.

      We’re not saying you need to tell a potential trainer to rip off his shirt and show off his six-pack before you hire him, but let’s be honest. He should appear pretty fit. “The very best trainers are the ones who live, eat, sleep and breathe health and fitness,” Duffy says. Plus, you won’t be inspired to get in the best shape of your life by someone with a gut, right? And as Duffy puts it: “If you’re going to climb Mt. Everest, are you going to go with a guide who has been there numerous times—or someone who read a book on how you get there?” Enough said.

      You’re paying someone to get you fitter than you’ve ever been in your life, so before you hire him, try him out—or at least observe how he works with clients. Is he focusing all his energy on the trainee, or is he chatting with other people and texting his way through the session? A good trainer not only tells you what to do and how to do it—he’s watching you closely and gauging your energy and effort levels throughout. That way, he can adjust your workout to get you the absolute best, and fastest, results possible.

      Source: http://www.mensfitness.com/training/...enced-trainers
      Comments 12 Comments
      1. Facetoface's Avatar
        Facetoface -
        Good advice, although I would say that in a trainers appearance if they seem unnaturally big (20-22 inch arms etc.) be wary that they are most likely unnatural and use it to get a lot of naive clients who want to look just like them, just like all the supplement ads show bodybuilders who on a lot more than whey protein and creatine to sell the product. Look for an all-around physically fit trainer who is going to be much more knowledgeable in building muscle with nutrition and programming as well as fat burning, target hr, posture correction etc etc...
      1. VS91588's Avatar
        VS91588 -
        I work for NYSC as a personal trainer and many of the trainers have certifications in ACE or NASM and they don't know sh*t. Those certifications could be obtained at home, taking the test on a computer. Pretty much an open book test. I on the other hand have a Bachelors of Science degree in Physical Education and a certification in Strength and Conditioning. The reason why I say this is because alot of the trainers in my gym are not athletic at all and told me they just started working out when they got the job in the gym which I was shocked about because I been working out since I was 15 and always had a background of knowledge of exercise and nutrition before attending college for my degree. I'm not saying you have to look like a bodybuilder but they are just clueless. Having a certification honestly does not mean you have knowledge.
      1. jbryand101b's Avatar
        jbryand101b -
        Ace and w/e that other one listed was, aren't respectable certifications.
        I would even say nasm isn't very good.

        If everyone has it how valuable can it be?
        It isn't.
      1. jbryand101b's Avatar
        jbryand101b -
        Originally Posted by Facetoface View Post
        Good advice, although I would say that in a trainers appearance if they seem unnaturally big (20-22 inch arms etc.) be wary that they are most likely unnatural and use it to get a lot of naive clients who want to look just like them, just like all the supplement ads show bodybuilders who on a lot more than whey protein and creatine to sell the product. Look for an all-around physically fit trainer who is going to be much more knowledgeable in building muscle with nutrition and programming as well as fat burning, target hr, posture correction etc etc...
        Some of this is good ( the last part ) but the beginning is total crap.
      1. Hyde's Avatar
        Hyde -
        Originally Posted by Facetoface View Post
        Good advice, although I would say that in a trainers appearance if they seem unnaturally big (20-22 inch arms etc.) be wary that they are most likely unnatural and use it to get a lot of naive clients who want to look just like them, just like all the supplement ads show bodybuilders who on a lot more than whey protein and creatine to sell the product. Look for an all-around physically fit trainer who is going to be much more knowledgeable in building muscle with nutrition and programming as well as fat burning, target hr, posture correction etc etc...
        Juice doesn't build muscle if you don't know how to lift or eat enough. So it would still be safe to say the trainer still knows how to build muscle, you just won't be building nearly as fast as he can on the bottle.
      1. grandroid828's Avatar
        grandroid828 -
        Originally Posted by Facetoface View Post
        Good advice, although I would say that in a trainers appearance if they seem unnaturally big (20-22 inch arms etc.) be wary that they are most likely unnatural and use it to get a lot of naive clients who want to look just like them, just like all the supplement ads show bodybuilders who on a lot more than whey protein and creatine to sell the product. Look for an all-around physically fit trainer who is going to be much more knowledgeable in building muscle with nutrition and programming as well as fat burning, target hr, posture correction etc etc...
        So a man that uses aas isnt knowledgable in fat burning, target hr, posture, etc? Brb gonna call jay cutler, ronnie coleman, arnold, and every person youve ever looked up to in this sport. Steroids arent magic. The only magic about them is their impeccable ability to turn people who dont know crap about them into idiots.
      1. 12345's Avatar
        12345 -
        Originally Posted by jbryand101b View Post
        Ace and w/e that other one listed was, aren't respectable certifications.
        I would even say nasm isn't very good.

        If everyone has it how valuable can it be?
        It isn't.
        I agree. I'm certified through ACE and I don't believe these certifications all that valuable.

        The best trainers at my gym are the ones who have extensive backgrounds in athletics, university education (exercise science, physics, biomechanics, etc.), take it upon themselves to further their knowledge by constantly reading new studies and articles, don't become complacent or satisfied with their current knowledge, and are open to learning new things yet have a solid understanding of the fundamentals.

        Trainers without real-life experience in the fitness or athletic world simply don't have the critical-thinking skills to solve an unexpected issue with a client. Exercises, workout sessions and especially entire programs rarely go exactly according to plan. Good trainers can think on their feet and come up with a solution to a problem quickly. Certifications don't teach you that.
      1. VS91588's Avatar
        VS91588 -
        Originally Posted by jbryand101b View Post
        Ace and w/e that other one listed was, aren't respectable certifications.
        I would even say nasm isn't very good.

        If everyone has it how valuable can it be?
        It isn't.
        Yeah exactly. Because its so easy to obtain. I think a degree in Physical Ed, Exercise Science, Kinesiology are more repeatable than a certification
      1. cgozz's Avatar
        cgozz -
        If a personal trainer has either a certification or a degree, if he or she does not live a fitness lifestyle chances are they will know very little about the fitness arena. A good personal trainer knows their craft. A piece of paper is just a piece of paper. One can have all the degrees or certifications and still suck. One must be passionate about what they do. There are doctors who suck and get sued and they have degrees. So in the end if you don't love what you do or are passionate about your craft chances are you are going to suck at what you do.
      1. BLaQz's Avatar
        BLaQz -
        This is an awesome article, but for people like myself who have been in the business for less than 5years that was mentioned in the article, you are doing them a disservice... If my clients read this, even with their results they might question me for no good reason... Just because people believe things that sometimes don't apply to them... Don't want to ruffle any feathers here, it's just like asking someone for 5 years experience for an entry level position...
      1. Facetoface's Avatar
        Facetoface -
        Originally Posted by grandroid828 View Post
        So a man that uses aas isnt knowledgable in fat burning, target hr, posture, etc? Brb gonna call jay cutler, ronnie coleman, arnold, and every person youve ever looked up to in this sport. Steroids arent magic. The only magic about them is their impeccable ability to turn people who dont know crap about them into idiots.
        Haha, touche, well of course those guys know their **** the most, have tons of money/time to invest into themselves and of course they also use AAS. That combined with genetics is why the typical bacne having gym rat will never come close to looking like them.. I guess I was trying to say that I've known trainers who use steroids which is all good, and many are awesome trainers but it is an advantage in pulling clientele, over a trainer who might know their **** better but doesn't look as big. Steroids are not magical but if someone is on a weekly gram test /grtren they can get by to do a lot less and will get a **** ton bigger. I know this. I was just making an obvious statement in my opinion in regards to the article saying you should always size up the fitness level of your trainer which I definitely agree with, but a naive person might think they are better off going with the most muscular trainer which is not ALWAYS the case in my opinion.
      1. seanghetto's Avatar
        seanghetto -
        Originally Posted by Hyde View Post
        Juice doesn't build muscle if you don't know how to lift or eat enough. So it would still be safe to say the trainer still knows how to build muscle, you just won't be building nearly as fast as he can on the bottle.
        Juice does build muscle weather you workout or not.
        A study was done where half a group was given AAS and worked out and another half was given AAS and did no physical training at all. The group that worked out gained 7lbs of lean mass and the group that didnt work out gained 5lbs.
        If you raise youre levels of test you will become more muscular whether you work out or not because it is a hormone. Thats why some guys are naturaly more muscular than others.

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