Are Eggs The Perfect Food? - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Are Eggs The Perfect Food?



      By JJ Virgin HuffPost

      Unless you're planning to hit '80s night at your favorite club this weekend, you're not going to wear acid-washed jeans or crimp your hair. So why are you still ordering egg white omelets?

      I don't mean you specifically: You're nutritionally savvier. I'm talking about your friend who, despite what the latest science shows, orders an egg-white omelet at brunch and stocks up on liquid egg whites (also known as chemicals in a carton) when her favorite grocery store puts them on sale.

      Or maybe you know a fitness-focused guy who makes the gym his second home, has an encyclopedic knowledge of sports nutrition, and yet loads up post-workout on skinless chicken breast and egg whites.

      Oh, and let's not even mention that new egg white sandwich a certain fast-food establishment is now pushing. Nope, don't even go there.

      You've grown from those catastrophic '80s fashion disasters. If you're not already, it's time to evolve your diet and eat the whole egg.

      Rotten Eggs: How A Perfect Food Can Go Bad

      I love eggs and used to eat them nearly every morning. You can even find some of my old videos on YouTube where I discuss eggs as part of a perfect breakfast.

      I reconsidered when I started using IgG food sensitivity testing and found over 70 percent of my clients tested positive for eggs. When I asked them to eliminate eggs and other highly-reactive foods for three weeks, their symptoms disappeared, they felt and looked better, and they finally shed those last few stubborn pounds.

      Of all my food culprits, I get the most criticism about eggs. "I agree with everything JJ says about food intolerances," bloggers and readers sometimes write, "except for eggs."

      For the record, I have never been anti-egg. I think they can be a perfectly healthy part of your diet. Trouble begins when you eat eggs every morning or purchase poor-quality eggs.

      Several culprits in eggs potentially contribute to food intolerances. Conventional eggs come from poorly-raised chickens injected with vaccines, treated abysmally, and slaughtered prematurely. Low-quality eggs are the sad aftermath.

      Eggs are also high in the pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, partly because chickens are fed soy and corn rather than their natural diet. One large conventional egg, to be exact, contains a woefully imbalanced 574 mg of omega-6s and 37 mg of omega-3 fatty acids.

      Chronic inflammation contributes to numerous diseases and can make you fat. A study in the journal Gastroenterology, for example, showed inflammation contributes to obesity, insulin resistance, and eventually Type 2 diabetes.

      We also over-consume eggs. I'm not singling eggs out: Most people have a very limited repertoire of foods they eat repeatedly, which over time can create gut-related issues.

      But because they're a great source of protein for vegetarians and low-carb meat eaters alike, eggs are the go-to protein for many people. That could become a problem if you eat them every morning.

      Here's the good news. When people pull eggs for three weeks, their gut issues improve, they feel and look better, and their symptoms disappear. Because they've healed their gut, they find they can then occasionally enjoy eggs when they re-introduce them.

      Maybe you believe you don't have egg intolerances, but how would you know unless you pull them for three weeks? What if something innocuous like eggs were creating symptoms like bloating and headaches or holding you back from meeting your fat-loss goals?

      Eggs are a Nutrient Powerhouse

      Intolerances aside, eggs are a great food. Three large eggs packs about 21 grams of very high-quality protein. While their saturated fat sometimes gets an undeserved bad rep, eggs actually provide a balance of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats.

      Yes, the fat is all in the yolk; so are the nutrients. Among its array of nutrients, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports one egg yolk provides:

      245 IUs of vitamin A
      37 IUs of vitamin D
      19 mg potassium
      25 mcg folate
      22 mg calcium

      According to Dr. Jonny Bowden in his book The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth, one large egg yolk also provides 300 mcg of choline, which forms betaine to help lower homocysteine (a risk factor for heart disease). Choline also helps make phosphatidylcholine to benefit your liver, nervous system, and brain.

      The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in egg yolks are powerful antioxidants and particularly valuable to prevent macular degeneration. A study in the journal Optometry showed lutein is a powerful antioxidant to improve vision. Another study in the Journal of Nutrition found men absorb lutein better from egg yolks than spinach or supplements.

      Bottom line: When you discard egg yolks, you're also discarding the majority of an egg's nutrients.

      What About Cholesterol?

      Besides fat, people discard egg yolks because of their cholesterol.

      Experts, including Bowden and Dr. Stephen Sinatra in their book The Great Cholesterol Myth, have come out swinging against the rampant anti-cholesterol mania. We now know that dietary cholesterol has almost no impact on blood cholesterol, but some people still fear this crucial molecule that helps make your sex hormones and vitamin D.

      Stop it. There are real problems in this world. Cholesterol in egg yolks is not one of them.

      Studies verify cholesterol is nothing to fear. One in the journal Food and Function concluded (and this is worth quoting): "We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet."

      Got that? "Multiple beneficial effects" by eating eggs. So stop fearing cholesterol and eat the whole egg.

      Solution: Buy The Best Eggs, Cook Them Right and Eat Infrequently

      If you've challenged eggs and can tolerate them, you can enjoy them a few times every week. Any more than that and you're risking creating food intolerances.

      Besides being packed with nutrients, the yolk will help you better absorb the egg's protein. Take that, egg white zealots!

      I also want you to buy barnyard eggs, which have more nutrients than conventional eggs. For instance, a study in Mother Earth News showed barnyard egg yolks have 3-6 times more vitamin D than conventional eggs.

      Even better if you can find barnyard raised eggs from chickens fed their natural diet (icky stuff like worms and dirt) rather than soy and corn. Visit your farmers market, talk to vendors, and really learn how they raise and treat their chickens.

      Not everyone has access to farm-raised chickens or eggs. Second best would be organic omega-3-enriched store-bought eggs. The essential fatty acids in eggs from chickens fed flax meal will help balance the egg's pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid.

      Soft-boiled or poached are the best way to prevent oxidation, a nasty chemical reaction that damages the egg's fats. Never, ever eat those buffet scrambled eggs, which have become oxidation central sitting under a heat lamp for who knows how long.

      Are eggs really nature's perfect food? Yes, provided that you don't have egg intolerances and choose the very best quality.

      References

      Chung HY, et al. Lutein bioavailability is higher from lutein-enriched eggs than from supplements and spinach in men. J Nutr. 2004 Aug;134(8):1887-93.

      Fernandez ML. Effects of eggs on plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations. Food Funct. 2010 Nov;1(2):156-60. doi: 10.1039/c0fo00088d. Epub 2010 Oct 19.

      Richer S, et al. Double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of lutein and antioxidant supplementation in the intervention of atrophic age-related macular degeneration: the Veterans LAST study (Lutein Antioxidant Supplementation Trial). Optometry. 2004 Apr;75(4):216-30.

      Shoelson SE, et al. Obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Gastroenterology. 2007 May;132(6):2169-80.

      http://www.motherearthnews.com/Relis...D-Content.aspx

      Bowden, J. (2007). The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth. Beverly, MA: Fair Winds.

      Bowden, J., Sinatra, S. (2012). The Great Cholesterol Myth. Beverley, MA: Fair Winds.

      Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jj-vir...b_3595128.html
      Comments 32 Comments
      1. fujindemon74's Avatar
        fujindemon74 -
        Is this AnabolicMinds.com?

        There isn't anything remotely "healthy" about most of the stuff we do.
        Squatting & deadlifting 2-3x or more bodyweight isn't healthy.
        The list goes on and on.

        No serious strength athlete I know eats for "health".
        We eat for performance.

        My breakfast consists of 4-6 strips of bacon, 3-4 slices of toast w/ prune spread, 5-6 fried eggs and 2 pints of whole milk.
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        When I'm in contest condition, I start every day with 6 hard boiled eggs. My breath stinks but I love the meal and the results stand on their merit.

        *as a side note, this guy says egg whites are chemicals in a carton... My egg whites are "quick whites" and the ingredient list couldn't be shorter: 100% pure pasteurized egg whites.

        My protein powders, on the other hand, are chemical cocktails that require a PhD to fully understand!
      1. girthypiece's Avatar
        girthypiece -
        Originally Posted by fujindemon74 View Post
        Is this AnabolicMinds.com?

        There isn't anything remotely "healthy" about most of the stuff we do.
        Squatting & deadlifting 2-3x or more bodyweight isn't healthy.
        The list goes on and on.

        No serious strength athlete I know eats for "health".
        We eat for performance.

        My breakfast consists of 4-6 strips of bacon, 3-4 slices of toast w/ prune spread, 5-6 fried eggs and 2 pints of whole milk.
        What exactly is "unhealthy" about squatting and deadlifting multiple times per week. And please explain how eating for performance is in opposition to eating for "health". Im dying to hear this
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        Originally Posted by girthypiece View Post
        What exactly is "unhealthy" about squatting and deadlifting multiple times per week. And please explain how eating for performance is in opposition to eating for "health". Im dying to hear this
        He said 2-3x bodyweight, not the frequency of 2-3x a week. Either way, both of those are beyond what any MD would recommend for health.

        Eating for performance and health CAN be the same, but not in the iron game! If you want to be beast (lean or not) you're going to take your nutrition beyond what is required for health.

        My doc tells me I only need 50-80g protein a day
      1. girthypiece's Avatar
        girthypiece -
        Originally Posted by Tampoco View Post

        He said 2-3x bodyweight, not the frequency of 2-3x a week. Either way, both of those are beyond what any MD would recommend for health.

        Eating for performance and health CAN be the same, but not in the iron game! If you want to be beast (lean or not) you're going to take your nutrition beyond what is required for health.

        My doc tells me I only need 50-80g protein a day
        Sorry for misquoting you. I know in speaking to many docs their education on protein came from the '70's when they still believed its molecular structure to be too large to be filtered by the kidneys therefore causing undue stress. In reality there has never been any study ever produced that shows protein to be a detriment to kidney health. Not ever.
        Also as a side note, running on pavement at times causes the equivalent impact force of 6-7x bodyweight on the knees.
        As for MD's and their opinions on squatting I would like to quote the great Rippetoe

        Anyone who says that full squats are "bad for the knees" has, with that statement, demonstrated conclusively that they are not entitled to an opinion about the matter. People who know nothing about a topic, especially a very technical one that requires specific training, knowledge, and experience, are not due an opinion about that topic and are better served by being quiet when it is asked about or discussed. For example, when brain surgery, or string theory, or the NFL draft, or women's dress sizes, or white wine is being discussed, I remain quiet, odd though that may seem. But seldom is this the case when orthopedic surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists, or nurses are asked about full squats
      1. Bigcountry08's Avatar
        Bigcountry08 -
        Originally Posted by girthypiece View Post

        Sorry for misquoting you. I know in speaking to many docs their education on protein came from the '70's when they still believed its molecular structure to be too large to be filtered by the kidneys therefore causing undue stress. In reality there has never been any study ever produced that shows protein to be a detriment to kidney health. Not ever.
        Also as a side note, running on pavement at times causes the equivalent impact force of 6-7x bodyweight on the knees.
        As for MD's and their opinions on squatting I would like to quote the great Rippetoe

        Anyone who says that full squats are "bad for the knees" has, with that statement, demonstrated conclusively that they are not entitled to an opinion about the matter. People who know nothing about a topic, especially a very technical one that requires specific training, knowledge, and experience, are not due an opinion about that topic and are better served by being quiet when it is asked about or discussed. For example, when brain surgery, or string theory, or the NFL draft, or women's dress sizes, or white wine is being discussed, I remain quiet, odd though that may seem. But seldom is this the case when orthopedic surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists, or nurses are asked about full squats
        One of the greatest quotes I have ever read.

        I will go to a doctor when I have the flu or break a bone. I will never go to a doctor about training advice or nutrition advice.
      1. fujindemon74's Avatar
        fujindemon74 -
        If I wasn't clear in my original post about multiples of bodyweight moved vs frequency of training, let me say I meant multiples of bodyweight moved.

        Regarding frequency, I squat every day. Either back squat or front squat, although I've been known to do both in a single day.

        A volume phase can last between 21-45 days, during which I typically complete upwards of 75 reps/day, the majority of which are between 70% and 95% of my daily max.
        A deload can last 7-14 days, during which I typically complete 28-35 reps/day, working up to a near max without a missed rep.
        This is in addition to throwing in at least two additional movements from deadlift, row, pulls/chins, overhead press, cleans, farmer's carry, yada, yada, yada, and several miles of hill climbs.

        I eat to perform.
        You can eat to be healthy.
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        I haven't had less than 300g of protein in a day in many years... I was using the doctor recommendation as an example of misinformation from "credible sources"

        I'm sure most of us have had strains, pulls, overuse tendinitis, tendonosis, bursitis, arthritis... In addition to the general aches and pains.

        Most people see those inevitable symptoms as unhealthy...I personally DGAS
      1. SXIPro's Avatar
        SXIPro -
        This was quite a poorly written article. It just wanders aimlessly without making any real points.
      1. fujindemon74's Avatar
        fujindemon74 -
        Originally Posted by SXIPro View Post
        This was quite a poorly written article. It just wanders aimlessly without making any real points.
        Srs. It belongs on a yoga website, not a site with "anabolic" in it's URL.
      1. ricroc's Avatar
        ricroc -
        Prune spread! I've been wondering if such an item exists. Now I gotta check this out.

        I love my eggs, too. Eat 4-5 or 6 if I'm feeling frisky.
      1. fujindemon74's Avatar
        fujindemon74 -
        Visit the kosher aisle of your grocery.
        It's the perfect amount of sweetness to go along with the salty/savory bacon/egg combo.
      1. mikeg313's Avatar
        mikeg313 -
        Wtf did I just read?
      1. biscuits's Avatar
        biscuits -
        Originally Posted by fujindemon74 View Post
        Is this AnabolicMinds.com?

        There isn't anything remotely "healthy" about most of the stuff we do.
        Squatting & deadlifting 2-3x or more bodyweight isn't healthy.
        The list goes on and on.

        No serious strength athlete I know eats for "health".
        We eat for performance.

        My breakfast consists of 4-6 strips of bacon, 3-4 slices of toast w/ prune spread, 5-6 fried eggs and 2 pints of whole milk.
        Last time I checked, anabolic minds has ALWAYS linked health related articles and studies... And since when was deadlifting and squatting heavy not healthy.. Also, anabolic minds is not only for strength athletes lmao.
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        Originally Posted by biscuits View Post
        Last time I checked, anabolic minds has ALWAYS linked health related articles and studies... And since when was deadlifting and squatting heavy not healthy.. Also, anabolic minds is not only for strength athletes lmao.

        I have to disagree with the notion that training super heavy is healthy. I LOVE going heavy, and I train at or above 90% of 1rm for months at a time during a strength phase...

        HOWEVER, any time the bar stalls and you grind through the sticking point (or even fail) you're going beyond what is necessary for "health". I miss reps verrrry rarely, but I know I'm being safer and more health conscious in the 70-80% range.

        May he, who always uses perfect form for maximal loads, post the first video.
      1. biscuits's Avatar
        biscuits -
        Originally Posted by Tampoco View Post
        I have to disagree with the notion that training super heavy is healthy. I LOVE going heavy, and I train at or above 90% of 1rm for months at a time during a strength phase...

        HOWEVER, any time the bar stalls and you grind through the sticking point (or even fail) you're going beyond what is necessary for "health". I miss reps verrrry rarely, but I know I'm being safer and more health conscious in the 70-80% range.

        May he, who always uses perfect form for maximal loads, post the first video.
        It's a lot healthier than pink dumbells. And if you lift to the point where you are consistanly injuring yourself... You might want to rethink your program
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        Originally Posted by biscuits View Post
        It's a lot healthier than pink dumbells. And if you lift to the point where you are consistanly injuring yourself... You might want to rethink your program
        I never said I'm consistently injuring myself.

        Maybe you weren't directing that comment toward me specifically.

        On the other hand, I would posit that anyone that has never had at least a tweak from training is either very new to training or using those pink dumbbells you refer to.

        My programming is quite sound, regardless of my aches and pains. I just like to impress myself a few times a week.
      1. fujindemon74's Avatar
        fujindemon74 -
        Originally Posted by biscuits View Post
        Last time I checked, anabolic minds has ALWAYS linked health related articles and studies... And since when was deadlifting and squatting heavy not healthy.. Also, anabolic minds is not only for strength athletes lmao.
        Then perhaps the site should be named FitnessMinds.com

        I have no injuries to speak of whatsoever, but I'm not deluding myself by thinking what I do is "healthy".

        If anything, it's challenging and is a mechanism by which I see how far I can push mentally and physically, but it ain't "healthy".
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        The author does make a good point about the way the egg producing chickens are kept. I'll take a farm egg over a factory egg any day.
      1. biscuits's Avatar
        biscuits -
        Originally Posted by Tampoco View Post
        I never said I'm consistently injuring myself.

        Maybe you weren't directing that comment toward me specifically.

        On the other hand, I would posit that anyone that has never had at least a tweak from training is either very new to training or using those pink dumbbells you refer to.

        My programming is quite sound, regardless of my aches and pains. I just like to impress myself a few times a week.
        It was more of a general statement, not directed towards you. And the part in bold is like saying athletes in any sport aren't healthy because they get injured ALL the time. Just because you get tweaks doesn't mean it's an unhealthy activity.