Do High Fat Diets Really Work - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Do High Fat Diets Really Work


      From ScienceDaily

      A 25 year study in Northern Sweden, published in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition Journal, is the first to show that a regional and national dietary intervention to reduce fat intake, decreased cholesterol levels, but a switch to the popular low carbohydrate diet was paralleled by in an increase in cholesterol levels. Over the entire 25 year period the population BMI continued to increase, regardless of either diet, and both the increase in body mass and increased cholesterol levels are indicators of increased cardiovascular risk.


      In the 1970's it was noticed that the incidence of cardiovascular disease was higher in northern Sweden than anywhere else in the country and that for men it was amongst the highest in the world. The Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) was set up in 1985 to address this and was later extended to include the entire country. The VIP included better food labelling, healthy information, cooking demonstrations and health examinations and counselling, including diet advice, and still continues today.

      Evaluation of this program was combined with data from the WHO MONICA project which monitors cardiovascular disease risk factors. Researchers from Umeå University, University of Gothenburg, and The National Board of Welfare collaborated to review this information covering a 25 year period from 1986.

      The impact of the VIP was clearly seen in the changing intake of fat and carbohydrate. By 1992 the fat intake for men had reduced by 3% for men and 4% for women and remained stable until 2005. Not only did fat intake reduce due to VIP but the types of fat changed, for example from butter to low fat spreads, which was mirrored by a decrease in cholesterol levels. After 2005 the levels of total and saturated fat intake began to increase, returning to levels above those in 1986, and the amount of complex carbohydrates eaten decreased. The timing of this matched the promotion of low GI diets in the media. Consequently cholesterol levels began to once more increase despite the introduction of cholesterol lowering medication.

      Prof Ingegerd Johansson, who led this research, commented, "The association between nutrition and health is complex. It involves specific food components, interactions among those food components, and interactions with genetic factors and individual needs. While low carbohydrate/high fat diets may help short term weight loss, these results of this Swedish study demonstrate that long term weight loss is not maintained and that this diet increases blood cholesterol which has a major impact on risk of cardiovascular disease."


      Story Source:
      The above story is reprinted from materials provided by BioMed Central.
      Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

      Journal Reference:
      Ingegerd Johansson, Lena Nilsson, Birgitta Stegmayr, Kurt Boman, Göran Hallmans and Anna Winkvist. Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden. Nutrition Journal, 2012 (in press)

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0611092349.htm
      Comments 5 Comments
      1. EasyEJL's Avatar
        EasyEJL -
        I'm calling BS on this study. It evaluates the goal of Sweeden trying to lower cardio vascular disease rate in northern Sweeden, but the measurement in the research study wasn't the incidence of CVD, but of cholesterol levels. Screw cholesterol levels, was there more or less incidence of cardio vascular disease?
      1. asdfvtn's Avatar
        asdfvtn -
        Originally Posted by EasyEJL View Post
        I'm calling BS on this study. It evaluates the goal of Sweeden trying to lower cardio vascular disease rate in northern Sweeden, but the measurement in the research study wasn't the incidence of CVD, but of cholesterol levels. Screw cholesterol levels, was there more or less incidence of cardio vascular disease?
        I'm not understanding you clearly here, are you asking whether or not there was more or less CVD? Because if you are, how can you "screw cholesterol levels"?
      1. martinez luis's Avatar
        martinez luis -
        High/Bad Cholesterol, or Bad Science....?
      1. EasyEJL's Avatar
        EasyEJL -
        Originally Posted by asdfvtn View Post

        I'm not understanding you clearly here, are you asking whether or not there was more or less CVD? Because if you are, how can you "screw cholesterol levels"?
        Absent other factors, high cholesterol has nothing to do with cvd. If the goal was to test lowering cholesterol levels at least that would be valid, but since high cholesterol doesn't itself cause cvd, thief study should have looked at just cvd levels
      1. Asgard1913's Avatar
        Asgard1913 -
        Originally Posted by EasyEJL View Post
        Absent other factors, high cholesterol has nothing to do with cvd. If the goal was to test lowering cholesterol levels at least that would be valid, but since high cholesterol doesn't itself cause cvd, thief study should have looked at just cvd levels
        The bigger problem with this is that it doesn't have anything to do with a high-fat diet as far as fitness/health is concerned. A 3-5% decrease in fat intake is a tiny change in overall diet. If you do a 40/30/30 diet at 2000 calories, that's an 18 calorie a day difference.

        The big problem here is that:
        After 2005 the levels of total and saturated fat intake began to increase, returning to levels above those in 1986, and the amount of complex carbohydrates eaten decreased. The timing of this matched the promotion of low GI diets in the media.
        They're eating saturated fat with simple carbs and saying that, because Keto diets became more popular, that Ketogenic diets must raise cholesterol. I mean, eating little-debbies all day long is not a high-fat diet in the sense that they're implying.

        This whole article is full-retard. Like, so retarded that these guys should be taken back behind the shed and shot for giving science a bad name.

        What's even worse is that they basically just say that "well, because we promoted a low fat diet and people were already eating healthier their cholesterol went down. Then they started eating cake and bacon all day around the time that other people somewhere promoted a diet totally different than what we're seeing and their cholesterol went up!" Obviously the only valid conclusion to draw is that ketogenic diets are the devil.