Denver Charging You To Work Out In A Park - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Denver Charging You To Work Out In A Park



      by: Ethan A. Huff NaturalNews

      Fitness groups that hold classes at public parks, green spaces, and other multi-use public areas in Colorado's capital city of Denver could soon have to pay user fees to the city in order to continue using them, according to new proposals. Paid exercise programs like CrossFit and yoga that involve large groups of people are taking over public spaces intended for general use, say city officials, and should thus have to gain proper use permits in order to hold their classes in public.

      Following the lead of Santa Monica, California, which recently proposed taking a cut of the revenues generated by fitness classes held in public parks, Denver officials are essentially trying to curb a growing trend that is changing the way public parks are used. Since many outdoor fitness classes are led by paid instructors, they are technically businesses operating on public property, say officials, which means they are technically in violation of city ordinances.

      "A lot of these groups really are businesses that provide their goods and services in the park," says Jeff Green from Denver Parks and Recreation, as quoted by CBS Denver. "If they don't have a permit, they're kind of breaking the law. We want people to enjoy our parks and this is kind of balancing the needs and wants of the commercial operators with the way that regular citizens and general park visitors use the park."

      When we covered this issue back in January with regards to the city of Santa Monica, it appeared as though officials were merely trying to generate more revenue at the expense of the more athletic among us. But officials have a good point -- how many times have you tried to use a public park for a family picnic or a game of pickup football, only to discover that a body sculpting boot camp or yoga class was taking up all the lawn space?

      Are paid fitness classes entitled to the same use of public parks as non-paying members of the general public?

      On the other hand, fitness classes, regardless of whether or not they charge people for their services, are technically still taxpaying contributors to the park system just like the rest of the general public. From this perspective, fitness classes have the same rights as anyone else when it comes to using public parks for recreation. And with so many overweight individuals in America today, it seem somewhat counterintuitive for city officials to meddle with public park usage.

      "We live in Colorado. This is beautiful. Why shouldn't we be out here?" asks Tonia Seidl, a member of a local boot camp that uses Denver public parks, as quoted by CBS Denver.

      "We should never discourage exercise. We need to encourage exercise (and) remove every barrier possible," adds Chris Lindley, her trainer.

      Still, if paid fitness classes obstruct the use of public parks by others who want to use them for free, should they receive priority? Or is the city of Denver merely trying to preserve the intended use of its parks by restricting the use of public parks for profit purposes? What do you think about the issue of paid fitness instruction taking place in public parks?

      Sources for this article include:

      http://denver.cbslocal.com

      http://www.naturalnews.com

      http://www.opposingviews.com


      Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041235_De...#ixzz2ZIl8Htp1
      Comments 7 Comments
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        It's just another tax. If any of the individuals in the fitness group wanted to use the park, say for jogging, no-one would ask them to pay. So why should they pay when they work out as part of a group? The fact is, money is changing hands so the govt. wants their cut. It's a tax.
      1. mikeg313's Avatar
        mikeg313 -
        Aren't parks for recreation and paid for by the tax payers already? What a country were becoming
      1. aj power's Avatar
        aj power -
        This is the norm in Australia.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Because it isn't quite the same as an individual taking a jog. That individual isn't running a business as they are jogging. They aren't creating value and making a profit from someone else so it isn't an issue.

        I agree that it's just another ploy at taking money from someone else who earned it - Colorado is ever-increasing their socialist agendas these days. Regardless, hats off to Colorado for coming up with a clever excuse to tax someone else's success, lol.

        Two other thoughts I have on personal trainers using free landscape for business ventures:

        1) It looks bad. They appear to be free-loaders from the outside looking in. No rent. Possibly no insurance.

        2) Then again, when I apply the principles of Capitalism (which is far superior to any other form of economy), I have to say that the personal trainers are adapting to a crappy, over-inflated economy that is hard to make a living in. It's brilliant, actually. They have found a sly yet very legal way to reduce costs. People like that are going to add value to our economy in years to come. So hats off to them as well.
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        Because it isn't quite the same as an individual taking a jog. That individual isn't running a business as they are jogging. They aren't creating value and making a profit from someone else so it isn't an issue.

        I agree that it's just another ploy at taking money from someone else who earned it - Colorado is ever-increasing their socialist agendas these days. Regardless, hats off to Colorado for coming up with a clever excuse to tax someone else's success, lol.

        Two other thoughts I have on personal trainers using free landscape for business ventures:

        1) It looks bad. They appear to be free-loaders from the outside looking in. No rent. Possibly no insurance.

        2) Then again, when I apply the principles of Capitalism (which is far superior to any other form of economy), I have to say that the personal trainers are adapting to a crappy, over-inflated economy that is hard to make a living in. It's brilliant, actually. They have found a sly yet very legal way to reduce costs. People like that are going to add value to our economy in years to come. So hats off to them as well.
        Not so sure about that business model. If the trainers in question have year round businesses, then they can probably only do the outdoor thing for part of the year right? My guess would be that their studio is empty on days when the instruction is outdoors. I don't know if they could actually avoid paying rent, what would they do if it rained? Or if it was a rainy summer? I think it's just nice to work out outdoors when the weather is good.

        & Who's to say someone jogging isn't running a business? The trainers at the gym I go to teach running classes all the time. I think the group doing yoga or what have you is just more visible.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        well, you can do group jogging and charge a fee, but if you have a pack of 10 people following you around, that might also grab someone's attention in a negative way.

        Honestly, I know a guy here locally that does a bootcamp outside in his church's lawn. He charges $3 a visit and does a MWF schedule for about 75 minutes w/ 60 minutes of actual training, rain or shine. People come. He regularly has 15-30 clients each visit and make a decent side living off that, generating anywhere from $500 to $1000 a month for about 5-6 hours of work per week. Not bad.

        So yeah that model could work under certain circumstances, but I wasn't suggesting it was a trainer's ONLY business model but rather an aspect of his business that is cost-friendly. It's always impressive to find ways to reduce your cost, increase the satisfaction of your customers and generate more revenue from it.

        And you could be right about them shutting their studio down to go do things outside for the sake of a pleasant change in scenery. However, I'm also certain there are many trainers doing this on the side, as most personal trainers do, and are looking for ways to work for themselves but also have a medium to train in. Too many gyms want you to be an employee for them as a trainer, and they take too much off the top and cap your rates, too. Unless you have your own gym, it's really hard to bust $40K/year doing personal training alone.
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        Yeah you're probably right. For a business owner, any way to cut costs and improve customer satisfaction at the same time is a good thing, that's for sure.