Creatine Better Post Workout - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Creatine Better Post Workout



      By Stephen Daniells Nutra Ingredients USA

      "This is the first investigation to demonstrate that the timing of creatine intake affects the adaptive response to exercise" - Jose Antonio and Victoria Ciccone

      The timing of creatine supplements can influence gains in strength and lean body mass, with post-workout supplementation yielding better results, says a new study from Nova Southeastern University in Florida.

      Consuming creatine monohydrate supplements post-workout produced a 1.1 kg greater increase in fat-free mass, and better performance in the bench press, compared to pre-workout, according to findings published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

      Lead researcher, Jose Antonio, PhD, assistant professor of exercise science at NSU, and CEO of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, told NutraIngredients-USA: “The main findings of our creatine study indeed showed that timing (i.e. supplement timing) can have an important effect on the adaptive response to exercise. Meaning, in well trained recreational bodybuilders, consuming creatine monohydrate immediately post exercise promotes greater gains in strength and lean body mass than consuming it prior to training.

      “Whether this is important over the course of taking creatine for months or years isn't known. Nonetheless, this investigation adds to the growing body of evidence that when you eat or take supplements does critically affect lean body mass and exercise performance.

      “You can't just cram all your food/calories/protein/nutrients etc in one sitting.”

      The study used the commercial creatine monohydrate product Creatine Plasma, provided by VPX Sports (Davie, FL). Dr Antonio is a former sports science consultant to VPX Sports.

      Popular

      Creatine is one of, if not the, most popular sports supplements in the world. Over 40% of athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) are reported to use creatine, according to survey data.

      In addition, regular creatine supplements use in aging adults can greatly reduce muscle loss due to sarcopenia.

      The effects of timing on exercise results have been studied for several nutrients, most notably protein, no previous study has examined the effect of timing of creatine intake on the adaptive response to exercise.

      Dr Antonio and Victoria Ciccone recruited 19 healthy recreational male bodybuilders (average age of 23.1, and average weight of 80.2 kg) to participate in their study. Participants were randomly assigned to receive creatine supplements (five grams) immediately before or after workouts for four weeks. During that time, the participants trained an average of five days per week, and supplementation during the two off-days was at the subjects convenience.

      Results showed that there was a significant time effect for fat-free mass and the bench press, but fat mass and body weight did not change significantly.

      “Post workout supplementation with creatine for a period of 4 weeks in recreational bodybuilders may produce superior gains in fat-free mass and strength in comparison to pre workout supplementation,” they wrote.

      “The use of recreational bodybuilders in the current investigation is advantageous because it is difficult for highly trained individuals to experience an increase in fat-free mass or muscular strength in the time frame allotted for this study,” they added.

      Source: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
      2013, 10:36
      “The effects of pre versus post workout supplementation of creatine monohydrate on body composition and strength”
      Authors: J. Antonio and V. Ciccone

      Source: http://mobile.nutraingredients-usa.c...y#.UjMZe8bXSjc
      Comments 17 Comments
      1. audix2359's Avatar
        audix2359 -
        "Results showed that there was a significant time effect for fat-free mass and the bench press, but fat mass and body weight did not change significantly."

        This doesn't add up to me. If fat-free mass goes up, but body weight is unchanged, then fat mass must go down. Or if fat-free mass goes up but fat mass is unchanged, then body weight must go up.

        So how can fat-free mass go up, but fass mass and bodyweight is unchanged? This doesn't make any sense to me.
      1. twiztid7's Avatar
        twiztid7 -
        But...who was phone?


        Seriously though, if you are on creatine for any significant period of time, your muscles are saturated. I don't see how timing can be relevant if you maintain that saturation.
      1. yanin's Avatar
        yanin -
        Ima sprinkle creatine in my post workout snickers bar so ill have creatine and sugar at once. Olympia here I come
      1. superbeast668's Avatar
        superbeast668 -
        Originally Posted by twiztid7 View Post
        But...who was phone?

        Seriously though, if you are on creatine for any significant period of time, your muscles are saturated. I don't see how timing can be relevant if you maintain that saturation.
        Totally agree with that... It's like saying injecting long esters post workout makes a difference.
      1. willymacmont's Avatar
        willymacmont -
        It would be nice if the writer would give us the other perimeters measured, not just fat-free mass and bench press.
      1. daoistic's Avatar
        daoistic -
        Originally Posted by audix2359 View Post
        "Results showed that there was a significant time effect for fat-free mass and the bench press, but fat mass and body weight did not change significantly."

        This doesn't add up to me. If fat-free mass goes up, but body weight is unchanged, then fat mass must go down. Or if fat-free mass goes up but fat mass is unchanged, then body weight must go up.

        So how can fat-free mass go up, but fass mass and bodyweight is unchanged? This doesn't make any sense to me.

        I think they mean statistically significant, which means that if the same results turn up for a larger sample size or for a longer period, it could grow to significance.
      1. purebred's Avatar
        purebred -
        Yet another creatine article advocating splitting hairs and overanalyzing of creatine supplementation.

        And an annoying attempt to market VPX.
      1. Admin's Avatar
        Admin -
        Lighten up Francis...
      1. R1balla's Avatar
        R1balla -
        disagree with the article but just my opinion.
      1. Hajiroku's Avatar
        Hajiroku -
        Assuming any of this is even applicable what are the proposed effects on those who take it pre and post?
      1. R1balla's Avatar
        R1balla -
        Originally Posted by Hajiroku View Post
        Assuming any of this is even applicable what are the proposed effects on those who take it pre and post?
        for me there isnt a difference at all between the two.
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by Hajiroku View Post
        Assuming any of this is even applicable what are the proposed effects on those who take it pre and post?
        All you really need to know is that creatine is awesome. It works, and you should take it. For maximum affect it works better with an insulin response, e.g. carbs or a protein shake, or even both as the pathway activates better with insulin.
      1. R1balla's Avatar
        R1balla -
        Originally Posted by Pandabear View Post
        All you really need to know is that creatine is awesome. It works, and you should take it. For maximum affect it works better with an insulin response, e.g. carbs or a protein shake, or even both as the pathway activates better with insulin.
        do you have proof of this or is this just what you have heard and believe it?
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by R1balla View Post

        do you have proof of this or is this just what you have heard and believe it?
        I'll shoot you some studies when I get home later tonight mate
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by R1balla View Post
        do you have proof of this or is this just what you have heard and believe it?
        Here you go: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18652081

        Specifically this is due to the creatine uptake being stimulated in the small intestine and kidneys through an insulin response. There is some evidence to support though that high carb meals slow the absorption, ultimately though the key message is simple. Insulin + creatine helps with the absorption overall. There are other studies too, but my time is limited at the moment. Feel free to check the sources listed in the study, plenty of reference material in there.

        Hope that Helps.
      1. R1balla's Avatar
        R1balla -
        Originally Posted by Pandabear View Post
        Here you go: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18652081

        Specifically this is due to the creatine uptake being stimulated in the small intestine and kidneys through an insulin response. There is some evidence to support though that high carb meals slow the absorption, ultimately though the key message is simple. Insulin + creatine helps with the absorption overall. There are other studies too, but my time is limited at the moment. Feel free to check the sources listed in the study, plenty of reference material in there.

        Hope that Helps.
        nice read. i just have one issue. the article says it "may.... " and "it seems like...". no def answers.
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by R1balla View Post
        nice read. i just have one issue. the article says it "may.... " and "it seems like...". no def answers.
        This is true. Although most mechanisms are known when it comes to creatine there are some that are not as well researched. There is no definitive answer if you were looking for a "this is caused by", etc. Hard science takes a long time to become hard science. Even well established theories can take a long time to be grounded. In any case, when I look at a lot of new research I look for the common errors in weak papers, if it is one. If it isn't and there is more evidence to support the "may" and "It seems like" then I err on the side of the evidence. In this case I'll keep taking my creatine with my carby meals and protein shakes to induce an insulinegenic response as it appears it may help the skeletal muscle. But hey man, do whatever you like; it's one guys opinion eh? :)

        Cheers,