Can You Get Fat From Too Much Protein? - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Can You Get Fat From Too Much Protein?



      by Will Brink Brinkzone

      In this vid I cover the (seemingly) never ending debate regarding the old advice that “protein intakes above your requirements will just be converted to bodyfat” that is the mantra of traditional nutrition advice. Is it true?



      This is the study discussed in this video:

      The effects of consuming a high protein diet (4.4 g/kg/d) on body composition in resistance-trained individuals

      Jose Antonio*, Corey A Peacock, Anya Ellerbroek, Brandon Fromhoff and Tobin Silver

      Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2014, 11:19 doi:10.1186/1550-2783-11-19

      Background
      The consumption of dietary protein is important for resistance-trained individuals. It has been posited that intakes of 1.4 to 2.0 g/kg/day are needed for physically active individuals. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a very high protein diet (4.4 g/kg/d) on body composition in resistance-trained men and women.
      Methods

      Thirty healthy resistance-trained individuals participated in this study (mean ± SD; age: 24.1 ± 5.6 yr; height: 171.4 ± 8.8 cm; weight: 73.3 ± 11.5 kg). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: Control (CON) or high protein (HP). The CON group was instructed to maintain the same training and dietary habits over the course of the 8 week study. The HP group was instructed to consume 4.4 grams of protein per kg body weight daily. They were also instructed to maintain the same training and dietary habits (e.g. maintain the same fat and carbohydrate intake). Body composition (Bod Pod®), training volume (i.e. volume load), and food intake were determined at baseline and over the 8 week treatment period.
      Results

      The HP group consumed significantly more protein and calories pre vs post (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the HP group consumed significantly more protein and calories than the CON (p < 0.05). The HP group consumed on average 307 ± 69 grams of protein compared to 138 ± 42 in the CON. When expressed per unit body weight, the HP group consumed 4.4 ± 0.8 g/kg/d of protein versus 1.8 ± 0.4 g/kg/d in the CON. There were no changes in training volume for either group. Moreover, there were no significant changes over time or between groups for body weight, fat mass, fat free mass, or percent body fat.

      Conclusions
      Consuming 5.5 times the recommended daily allowance of protein has no effect on body composition in resistance-trained individuals who otherwise maintain the same training regimen. This is the first interventional study to demonstrate that consuming a hypercaloric high protein diet does not result in an increase in body fat.
      Full study:

      http://www.jissn.com/content/11/1/19#abs

      - See more at: http://www.brinkzone.com/nutritional....PbzK3jRJ.dpuf
      Comments 9 Comments
      1. braskibra's Avatar
        braskibra -
        Notice how there wasn't any lean mass gains either, so essentially taking in more protein is useless, it doesn't make u fat nor does it help u build muscle (according to these results)
      1. TrainPsycho's Avatar
        TrainPsycho -
        Originally Posted by braskibra View Post
        Notice how there wasn't any lean mass gains either, so essentially taking in more protein is useless, it doesn't make u fat nor does it help u build muscle (according to these results)
        Wouldn't it just get converted to glucose by gluconeogensis?
      1. TrainPsycho's Avatar
        TrainPsycho -
        If not, why not just overeat protein to help with satiety when cutting?
      1. TrainPsycho's Avatar
        TrainPsycho -
        Otherwise you could just stuff yourself with protein to help with satiety without negative effects when cutting.
      1. David Dunn's Avatar
        David Dunn -
        "Hyper-caloric amounts" are the key words. Hyper-caloric means calories above your energy expenditure.

        You need to be slightly hyper-caloric to gain lean body mass. Excessively hyper-caloric intake of any macro-nutrient will make you fat.

        I don't believe an "8 week study" is sufficient time to see that effect on body composition. I believe that over a longer period of time it will indeed manifest itself in a gain of fat mass.
      1. braskibra's Avatar
        braskibra -
        That's why I'm skeptical about this study, hyper caloric diet with excessive protein with no changes in fat free mass or body fat?
      1. Whacked's Avatar
        Whacked -
        Originally Posted by TrainPsycho View Post
        Wouldn't it just get converted to glucose by gluconeogensis?
        Well, if/when needed then yes; but this study is discussing something different.

        Protein also doesn't have any magical properties- when taken in excess while part of a hypercaloric state, fat gain will occur as well.

        This article is a mess.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Did u guys consider the metabolic consequences of that much protein intake? It could affect the metabolism by as much as a couple hundred calories per day if those protein sources replaced fat and/or carb sources.
      1. braskibra's Avatar
        braskibra -
        I don't think it really matters, the subjects didn't gain anything or lose anything, if staying the status quo is the goal id choose the cheaper option (less protein)

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