Breathe Backwards For Back - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Breathe Backwards For Back


      by Nick Nilsson Brink Zone

      Every experienced weight trainer knows that the proper way to breathe during a set is to inhale during the negative (lowering) phase and exhale during the positive (lifting) phase. But is this the best way to breathe in all exercises?

      As a matter of fact, it isnít. Iím going to show you exactly how and why you should breathe BACKWARDS during many if not most back exercises. I will use the lat pulldown exercise to demonstrate this powerful technique.

      Fact: the pulldown movement is more effective when done with an arched lower back and puffed-up (expanded) chest.

      This body position more fully activates the latissimus dorsi muscles. In fact, if your lower back isnít arched, itís extremely difficult for your lats to contract. The straight-back position throws more tension on the biceps and upper back muscles.

      Expanding your chest helps to accentuate this arched-back position and helps the lats activate.

      Fact: exhalation (breathing out) makes your chest contract. Inhalation (breathing in) makes your chest expand.

      Fact: the typical breathing pattern of the pulldown consists of breathing out as you are pulling the weight down and breathing in as you are letting it back up.

      What this means to you is that the typical breathing pattern is caving the chest in when you should be puffing the chest out!

      Take a deep breath in and notice what happens to your chest. It puffs out and expands. This is the optimal position for your torso during the pulldown exercise.

      Now carry this logic over to the pulldown movement. As you pull the weight down, take a deep breath in. Your chest will puff up to meet the bar automatically and your lats will engage strongly.

      If youíve ever had a hard time feeling your lats working when you do back exercises, use this technique and you will certainly feel an immediate difference.

      This amazingly simple technique can be applied to almost any back exercise from pulldowns to chin-ups to seated cable rows. Try this technique the next time you work your back and youíll see just how powerful breathing backwards can be!

      Source: http://www.brinkzone.com/exercise-pe...ing-your-back/
      Comments 6 Comments
      1. OrganicShadow's Avatar
        OrganicShadow -
        It's counter intuitive but I've been doing this for a while. The difference is night and day. As a basic premise: as the weight in = breathe in. Weight out = breathe out. Takes time to adjust with groups like back or biceps where you would think to breathe out during contraction.
      1. fightbackhxc's Avatar
        fightbackhxc -
        Originally Posted by OrganicShadow View Post
        It's counter intuitive but I've been doing this for a while. The difference is night and day. As a basic premise: as the weight in = breathe in. Weight out = breathe out. Takes time to adjust with groups like back or biceps where you would think to breathe out during contraction.
        Interesting...
      1. HardCore1's Avatar
        HardCore1 -
        Makes sense!
      1. rambofireball's Avatar
        rambofireball -
        This is kinda silly, and dangerous. It is absolutely possible to keep your back arched and chest popped while exhaling. Guy is asking for an aneurysm.
      1. xigotmailx's Avatar
        xigotmailx -
        I used this technique for the first time last night on low rows and it is crazy how instantaneously you can feel the difference. I also used this with pullups, made them ridiculously hard
      1. OrganicShadow's Avatar
        OrganicShadow -
        It makes it seem hard at first but then it just starts to make sense. You may want to reconsider where you expand during inhalation. Instead of working to expand the rib cage try allowing your abdomen to expand. The rib cage doesnt give nearly as much as soft tissue like the stomach... theres a lot of reading to be done on chest vs diaphragm breathing.

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