Big Breakfast Increases Overall Health - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Big Breakfast Increases Overall Health



      From Science Daily

      A high-calorie breakfast protects against diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular problems, says TAU researcher

      Whether you hope to lose weight or just stay healthy, what you eat is a crucial factor. The right nutrients can not only trim your waistline, but also provide energy, improve your mood, and stave off disease. Now a Tel Aviv University researcher has found that it's not just what you eat -- but when.

      Metabolism is impacted by the body's circadian rhythm -- the biological process that the body follows over a 24 hour cycle. So the time of day we eat can have a big impact on the way our bodies process food, says Prof. Daniela Jakubowicz of TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Diabetes Unit at Wolfson Medical Center. In a recent study, she discovered that those who eat their largest daily meal at breakfast are far more likely to lose weight and waist line circumference than those who eat a large dinner.

      And the benefits went far beyond pounds and inches. Participants who ate a larger breakfast -- which included a dessert item such as a piece of chocolate cake or a cookie -- also had significantly lower levels of insulin, glucose, and triglycerides throughout the day, translating into a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. These results, published recently in the journal Obesity, indicate that proper meal timing can make an important contribution towards managing obesity and promoting an overall healthy lifestyle.
      The study was done in collaboration with Dr. Julio Wainstein of TAU and the Wolfson Medical Center and Dr. Maayan Barnea and Prof. Oren Froy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

      A dramatic difference

      To determine the impact of meal timing on weight loss and health, Prof. Jakubowicz and her fellow researchers conducted a study in which 93 obese women were randomly assigned to one of two isocaloric groups. Each consumed a moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet totalling 1,400 calories daily for a period of 12 weeks. The first group consumed 700 calories at breakfast, 500 at lunch, and 200 at dinner. The second group ate a 200 calorie breakfast, 500 calorie lunch, and 700 calorie dinner. The 700 calorie breakfast and dinner included the same foods.

      By the end of the study, participants in the "big breakfast" group had lost an average of 17.8 pounds each and three inches off their waist line, compared to a 7.3 pound and 1.4 inch loss for participants in the "big dinner" group. According to Prof. Jakubowicz, those in the big breakfast group were found to have significantly lower levels of the hunger-regulating hormone ghrelin, an indication that they were more satiated and had less desire for snacking later in the day than their counterparts in the big dinner group.

      The big breakfast group also showed a more significant decrease in insulin, glucose, and triglyceride levels than those in the big dinner group. More important, they did not experience the high spikes in blood glucose levels that typically occur after a meal. Peaks in blood sugar levels are considered even more harmful than sustained high blood glucose levels, leading to high blood pressure and greater strain on the heart.

      Eliminating late night snacking

      These findings suggest that people should adopt a well thought-out meal schedule, in addition to proper nutrition and exercise, to optimize weight loss and general health. Eating the right foods at the wrong times can not only slow down weight loss, it can also be harmful. In their study, the researchers found that those in the big dinner group actually increased their levels of triglycerides -- a type of fat found in the body -- despite their weight loss, reports Prof. Jakubowicz.

      Prof. Jakubowicz suggests an end to late night snacking. Mindless eating in front of the computer or television, especially in the late evening hours, is a huge contributor to the obesity epidemic, she believes. It increases not only poundage, but the risk of cardiovascular disease -- making that midnight sugar rush more costly than it appears.

      Story Source:
      The above story is based on materials provided by American Friends of Tel Aviv University.
      Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

      Journal Reference:
      Daniela Jakubowicz, Maayan Barnea, Julio Wainstein, Oren Froy. High Caloric intake at breakfast vs. dinner differentially influences weight loss of overweight and obese women. Obesity, 2013; DOI: 10.1002/oby.20460

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...Weight+Loss%29
      Comments 17 Comments
      1. jerrysiii's Avatar
        jerrysiii -
        Ok IF-ers let's hear the rebuttal. It actually seems like a good study.

        Pros: They actually eat a controlled diet and both groups consumed the same total calories and daily macros.

        Cons: Population was obese woman and both diets were low in protein.

        The results are very significant. We're not talking minor, but very substantial differences in scale weight and waist circumference.
      1. ricroc's Avatar
        ricroc -
        This is interesting.

        I just started with IF, so it is too soon for me to offer one way or the other.

        I am learning, though this is nothing novel, that everyone needs to adjust their diet to their own specific needs and wants.
      1. SXIPro's Avatar
        SXIPro -
        All I can say is Sign Me Up. I love breakfast. Tomorrow's will be a pastrami omellete using 3 duck eggs with swiss cheese and spicy brown mustard, home fries, whole grain toast, yogurt, black coffee, OJ and milk.
      1. ricroc's Avatar
        ricroc -
        Sounds good
      1. compudog's Avatar
        compudog -
        Of course a big breakfast will work better than a big dinner for fat loss. The problem is, try going to bed hungry and see how that works long term... There's a reason why people eat a big meal at night, it's to prepare for the overnight fast.

        The "obesity epidemic" isn't caused by anything people do on an individual level. People are not different today in any substantial way than 30 years ago. It's caused by a change in the the economic landscape; specifically, the value and availability of food. Food is much less valuable than it used to be, and much more available, so it's consumed in greater quantities. Not a popular opinion I guess since it implies we haven't got as much control over what we do as we'd like to think, but isn't that obvious anyway?
      1. virago88's Avatar
        virago88 -
        Originally Posted by SXIPro View Post
        All I can say is Sign Me Up. I love breakfast. Tomorrow's will be a pastrami omellete using 3 duck eggs with swiss cheese and spicy brown mustard, home fries, whole grain toast, yogurt, black coffee, OJ and milk.
        I think I would be in a food coma for the rest of the day if I ate all that. I would love I have a big breakfast but find it too difficult to function afterwards. Anyone else have this problem? Till then 50g oats, water and 1/4 cup almond milk.
      1. TexasGuy's Avatar
        TexasGuy -
        Bazinga. Science yet again catching up to results, though nutrient timing and TEF values still haven't been disproven by the IF marketing machine.
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        Originally Posted by jerrysiii View Post
        Ok IF-ers let's hear the rebuttal. It actually seems like a good study.

        Pros: They actually eat a controlled diet and both groups consumed the same total calories and daily macros.

        Cons: Population was obese woman and both diets were low in protein.

        The results are very significant. We're not talking minor, but very substantial differences in scale weight and waist circumference.
        It's hard to see exactly what the studies parameters were as the full text costs money, and my interest in obese studies is minimal.

        I'm not an IF, just to be clear, what I will say though is that different approaches can work for different goals. The main thing you have to understand about studies in any scientific field is relevance. In other words; is this relevant to me? Am I an obese woman who has "cravings later in the day"? Or maybe, i'm a lean athlete who has no cravings and strength trains every day. Your metabolic function changes and adapts accordingly to exercise, stress, rest, your current bf %, etc. Additionally it is well known that obese and overweight people have bad impulse control, under report calories and suffer from diseases that healthy individuals may likely never see. This is not so much about breakfast as changing a habit to satiate hunger on people that have no impulse control. It's a jump to a conclusion to insinuate that big breakfasts are the healthier option for everyone, just like it's a false claim to say that skipping breakfast is best for everyone. It's just not the case at all.

        So what i'm trying to say is the study is relevant: For what? For who? Does it fit YOUR purpose? Maybe it does, or maybe skipping breakfast works better for you for a short time/long time/forever.

        Try not to jump on one band wagon or another (not that you are specifically, I just see it so much from everyone these days). Everything has it's place within reason, depending on the result you want to achieve and whether it's sustainable for you.
      1. Pandabear's Avatar
        Pandabear -
        It's hard to see exactly what the studies parameters were as the full text costs money, and my interest in obese studies is minimal.

        I'm not an IF, just to be clear, what I will say though is that different approaches can work for different goals. The main thing you have to understand about studies in any scientific field is relevance. In other words; is this relevant to me? Am I an obese woman who has "cravings later in the day"? Or maybe, i'm a lean athlete who has no cravings and strength trains every day. Your metabolic function changes and adapts accordingly to exercise, stress, rest, your current bf %, etc. Additionally it is well known that obese and overweight people have bad impulse control, under report calories and suffer from diseases that healthy individuals may likely never see. This is not so much about breakfast as changing a habit to satiate hunger on people that have no impulse control. It's a jump to a conclusion to insinuate that big breakfasts are the healthier option for everyone, just like it's a false claim to say that skipping breakfast is best for everyone. It's just not the case at all.

        So what i'm trying to say is the study is relevant: For what? For who? Does it fit YOUR purpose? Maybe it does, or maybe skipping breakfast works better for you for a short time/long time/forever.

        Try not to jump on one band wagon or another (not that you are specifically, I just see it so much from everyone these days). Everything has it's place within reason, depending on the result you want to achieve and whether it's sustainable for you.
      1. SXIPro's Avatar
        SXIPro -
        Originally Posted by virago88 View Post
        I think I would be in a food coma for the rest of the day if I ate all that. I would love I have a big breakfast but find it too difficult to function afterwards. Anyone else have this problem? Till then 50g oats, water and 1/4 cup almond milk.
        I typically eat breakfast about 20 minutes after I leave the gym(7:30AM or so) and I am ravenous at that point. By 10:30 AM I am usually chowing down an entire rotisserie chicken. Food is my favorite supplement. :)
      1. SXIPro's Avatar
        SXIPro -
        Originally Posted by virago88 View Post
        I think I would be in a food coma for the rest of the day if I ate all that. I would love I have a big breakfast but find it too difficult to function afterwards. Anyone else have this problem? Till then 50g oats, water and 1/4 cup almond milk.
        I typically eat breakfast about 20 minutes after I leave the gym(7:30AM or so) and I am ravenous at that point. By 10:30 AM I am usually chowing down an entire rotisserie chicken. Food is my favorite supplement. :)
      1. eluruguayo's Avatar
        eluruguayo -
        Yeah yeah, "anecdotes are not data" and all that... but, I am never hungry at the beginning of the day, so forcing myself to eat a big breakfast would be hellish. And on top of that, when I *do* eat a big breakfast, I am much hungrier later in the day. Which makes sense -- your stomach expands when you eat a lot of food, so, it's much more of a bitch when it empties back out. (If you eat a big dinner, that happens when you're asleep.)
        And finally, I can go through the day hungry -- in fact, I get a lot more s**t done when I'm a little hungry -- but I can't fall asleep hungry. So this Tel Aviv plan is just five sizes and three colors of "bad" if you ask me.
      1. CharlesT's Avatar
        CharlesT -
        This is very significant indeed....if you are an obese woman.
        The study was with 93 fat ladies with the metabolism of a snail Im guessing.
      1. THOR 70's Avatar
        THOR 70 -
        A couple points:

        I'm not hungry in the morning.
        I workout at night so a quality re-feed is a must.
        200 calories for dinner I would sleep like ****.
        When I eat breakfast I get very hungry a few hours after, even when I eat clean.
        I have a very mentally depending job, and when eat breakfast I get a bit of brain fog vs staying sharp till lunch while IF'n
        Time-I have it to cook/enjoy a quality dinner.

        These aren't scientific but they have truly helped me maintain a healthy weight with the least effort.

        I think they got results because it was a bunch of fatty's in a controlled environment.

        If you want great "Science" keifer's book, Carb back loading, offer some awesome data on hormones in the morning etc.

        Not obsessed with IF but it just seems logical/effective for my situation.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        One factor that is overlooked is that all of these individuals in the study were likely not eating breakfast to begin with or a small one at best. I know very few women that actually chow down a 1/3 to 1/2 of their daily calories a breakfast alone.

        The change in diet plan alone would stimulate the metabolism and get a response out of the body. That would explain in itself why the "big breakfast eaters" had the most dramatic results.

        I actually incorporate IF w/ the bodybuilding style diet EOD. Today I fasted for 16hrs, tomorrow I will not. Changing the rhythm of your metabolism always keeps fat-burning a top priority of the body.

        Fact is, for myself, it'll never apply to me since my goal is muscle mass and I likely train harder and longer than obese women. I will continue to eat alot at every meal and if I'm still not eating enough, then I'll train harder. If that doesn't work, then I'll take some GHRP and then I'll eat like it's my last day on Earth.
      1. EatMoar's Avatar
        EatMoar -
        My stomach just doesn't take it in the morning. I can't eat early. If I wake up early and eat oats/eggs/toast I'll be puking in an hour after eating.
      1. TexasGuy's Avatar
        TexasGuy -
        Yeah but you are 5'10" and 177 pounds. What is the common goal here, building muscle right?

        Originally Posted by eluruguayo View Post
        Yeah yeah, "anecdotes are not data" and all that... but, I am never hungry at the beginning of the day, so forcing myself to eat a big breakfast would be hellish. And on top of that, when I *do* eat a big breakfast, I am much hungrier later in the day. Which makes sense -- your stomach expands when you eat a lot of food, so, it's much more of a bitch when it empties back out. (If you eat a big dinner, that happens when you're asleep.)
        And finally, I can go through the day hungry -- in fact, I get a lot more s**t done when I'm a little hungry -- but I can't fall asleep hungry. So this Tel Aviv plan is just five sizes and three colors of "bad" if you ask me.

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