Benefits Of Dairy - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Benefits Of Dairy


      By Rob Clarke Driven Sports

      There seems to be two distinct camps when it comes to dairy consumption. First, there are those who utilize it to its full potential for deriving protein and other excellent nutrients. And then there are those that aim to restrict dairy as much as possible as they believe it makes them look “puffy” and bloat them.

      I am not in the latter group. I consume dairy on a daily basis. Unless you have a legitimate issue with lactose then you really should too. And I don’t just mean drinking milk. There are a lot of excellent food sources that stem from milk, with particular focus on certain cheeses and yogurts. You can do your diet a huge service by getting nutrition from these sources.

      My particularly choices are fat-free cottage cheese and Greek yogurt (note: NOT Greek-style yogurt). In fact fat-free Greek yogurt is quite a revelation when mixed with your favorite protein powder (I now use Greek yogurt for “Gloop”). I am also a big fan of the almond milk varieties. I should make it known that I don’t suggest the fat-free dairy varieties because I am a “fatophobe”. I just find that the fat-free versions tend to have a slightly higher protein value for a lower calorie level.

      I’m not just pointing this out so that you guys have a new protein source to try, or a new way to get inventive with a recipe. New research appears to be looking more into dairy and the effect on body composition, reinforcing why you should be consuming it. For instance, take a new study published in the International Journal of Obesity this month. In it researchers from Iran have conducted a meta-analysis of several other studies investigating dairy consumption and its effect on body composition. They concluded that as part of a calorie-controlled diet people that include dairy as part of their diet can improve their body composition to a greater degree than those that avoid it. In other words, less fat, more muscle.

      The reason for this finding is believed to be largely due to the protein content of the dairy. Not only is protein associated with muscle repair and building as every good bodybuilder knows, it also has a significant appetite-suppressing effect. A new study coming out of Denmark actually looked at this. Strangely, the subjects in this particular study did not report feeling like their appetites had been suppressed following milk consumption. But it was clear that something was at work because they did not eat as many calories in a subsequent meal.

      In addition to the quality protein content, dairy is tends to be rich in vitamin D and calcium. Both of these micronutrients have been found to be beneficial for improving body composition in a recently published study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Particular visceral fat, which as you should know by now, is the type of fat packed in and around the organs in your midsection. This is the fat that doctor’s are more concerned with from a health perspective (A nice plug for Lean Xtreme™ there!)

      As you aim to get a lot of protein in your diet each day, don’t be afraid to get some (or a lot) of it from dairy.

      Sources:

      Abargouei AS, Janghorbani M, Salehi-Marzijarani M, Esmaillzadeh A. Effect of dairy consumption on weight and body composition in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Jan 17.

      Lorenzen J, Frederiksen R, Hoppe C, Hvid R, Astrup A. The effect of milk proteins on appetite regulation and diet-induced thermogenesis. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan 25.

      Rosenblum JL, Castro VM, Moore CE, Kaplan LM. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is associated with decreased abdominal visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan;95(1):101-8.

      Source: http://www.getds.com/20120127353/Blo...n+Sports+Blog)
      Comments 8 Comments
      1. dialtone's Avatar
        dialtone -
        I have always been told by people to drop the milk... but I still drink skim mink every morning with my shake and have my homemade, plain yogurt as a snack. Don't think I will be dropping that anytime soon.
      1. jgassen15's Avatar
        jgassen15 -
        Originally Posted by dialtone View Post
        I have always been told by people to drop the milk... but I still drink skim mink every morning with my shake and have my homemade, plain yogurt as a snack. Don't think I will be dropping that anytime soon.
        The problem is not in dairy's "bloat" itself, or that it is not a viable source of protein. The problem is that over half the population can't properly digest it, and because of that, it can be abruptive to the absorption of a variety of other minerals and vitamins, in particularly zinc. Improper digestions and gastorintestinal distress can also lead to a rise in cortisol, which in turns lower FGF2 in the brain, potentially resulting in anxiety and depression in the consumer (that's a simplifed version of one of many pathways improper digestion affects neurochemistry). Also, improper digestion can undoubtedly impede performance. After the agricultural evolution, although the AVERAGE lifespan increased as infant mortality and starvation decreased, the health of the average person also took a toll as we relied on a variety of foods that are less nutrient dense and we can't digest as well. Lactose is a tricky saccharide for the human digestive system and choosing not to drink milk, for those I know of, is a conscious, educated decision based on the way it affects performance, the potential detriments to health, and the negative impact it could potentially have on longevity. Am I saying that milk products should be avoided by everyone, absolutely not. They are an affordable, calorie-dense food that can undoubtedly help those who are not so lactose-sensitive to grow. I myself keep some Greek yogurt around to use instead of sour cream in some instances, or if I'm in a rush at breakfast. \The natural cultures in the yogurt usually don't upset my stomach as much as cheese or milk. The point is, the reasons to avoid milk go far beyond the bloat, and if you've never tried training after being completely off dairy for a month, I suggest you at least try it. You may not know how good you actually feel.
      1. GuyverX's Avatar
        GuyverX -
        Originally Posted by jgassen15 View Post
        The problem is not in dairy's "bloat" itself, or that it is not a viable source of protein. The problem is that over half the population can't properly digest it, and because of that, it can be abruptive to the absorption of a variety of other minerals and vitamins, in particularly zinc. Improper digestions and gastorintestinal distress can also lead to a rise in cortisol, which in turns lower FGF2 in the brain, potentially resulting in anxiety and depression in the consumer (that's a simplifed version of one of many pathways improper digestion affects neurochemistry). Also, improper digestion can undoubtedly impede performance. After the agricultural evolution, although the AVERAGE lifespan increased as infant mortality and starvation decreased, the health of the average person also took a toll as we relied on a variety of foods that are less nutrient dense and we can't digest as well. Lactose is a tricky saccharide for the human digestive system and choosing not to drink milk, for those I know of, is a conscious, educated decision based on the way it affects performance, the potential detriments to health, and the negative impact it could potentially have on longevity. Am I saying that milk products should be avoided by everyone, absolutely not. They are an affordable, calorie-dense food that can undoubtedly help those who are not so lactose-sensitive to grow. I myself keep some Greek yogurt around to use instead of sour cream in some instances, or if I'm in a rush at breakfast. \The natural cultures in the yogurt usually don't upset my stomach as much as cheese or milk. The point is, the reasons to avoid milk go far beyond the bloat, and if you've never tried training after being completely off dairy for a month, I suggest you at least try it. You may not know how good you actually feel.
        Excellent point.
        If I cannot get it from almond milk, coconut, milk, veggies, or spps it is not happening.
        If I so much as look at a dairy product I have a very bad digestive situation.
      1. Longtorso's Avatar
        Longtorso -
        Then there's the "camp" of us that believes that the garbage we call milk is not worthy of consumption. The amount of antibiotics and hormones used in the industry is staggering, not to mention the base diet of the cattle in question. The comment on the nutritive value of our food is very salient - thanks to Monstanto and industrial farming we've managed to turn our food into genetically modified poison. I love coconut milk, and almond milk is OK. There are plenty of other places to find the same nutrition you get from milk - kale, for example, has THREE times the calcium of milk... Buy local, buy organic!
      1. EasyEJL's Avatar
        EasyEJL -
        I'd suggest anyone who has dairy allergy type issues to try this

        http://www.hood.com/Products/prodDet...?id=644&lb=851

        Attachment 51996

        basically its milk with a majority of the lactose removed, then with sucralose as sweetener to make it taste right. 35 calories a cup for 6g protein isn't bad at all, makes nice shakes.

        Calories 35 Calories from Fat 0
        % Daily Values
        Total Fat 0g 1%
        Saturated Fat 0g 1%
        Trans Fat 0g
        Cholesterol 5mg 2%
        Sodium 180mg 8%
        Total Carbohydrate 4g 1%
        Fiber <1g 4%
        Sugar 3g
        Protein 6g 11%
      1. JudoJosh's Avatar
        JudoJosh -
        Originally Posted by EasyEJL View Post
        I'd suggest anyone who has dairy allergy type issues to try this

        http://www.hood.com/Products/prodDet...644&amp;lb=851

        Attachment 51996

        basically its milk with a majority of the lactose removed, then with sucralose as sweetener to make it taste right. 35 calories a cup for 6g protein isn't bad at all, makes nice shakes.
        There is a difference between having a milk allergy and being lactose intolerant. Milk allergies are a reaction to the proteins in milk (whey and/or casein) while lactose intolerance is the inability to metabolize the sugar in milk (lactose)

        If someone is allergic to milk (whey and/or casein) then a milk product with the lactose removed will still trigger a allergic reaction.
      1. EasyEJL's Avatar
        EasyEJL -
        Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
        There is a difference between having a milk allergy and being lactose intolerant. Milk allergies are a reaction to the proteins in milk (whey and/or casein) while lactose intolerance is the inability to metabolize the sugar in milk (lactose)

        If someone is allergic to milk (whey and/or casein) then a milk product with the lactose removed will still trigger a allergic reaction.
        true, probably should have used different wording. Although my feeling is that light lactose intolerance is more common than the protein allergies, both do affect people.
      1. JudoJosh's Avatar
        JudoJosh -
        They are often confused so I was just clarifying

        I would agree lactose intolerance is way more common than milk allergies but I also think many people do have milk allergies and just arent aware of it. I have drank milk my entire life and it wasn't till my son was born that I realized I was allergic to casein. Soon as I cut milk out of my diet completely my eczema and heart burn/reflux problems went away completely. Since then I reintroduced whey in and have been fine. So I figured it was the casein and I had a casein shake and acid reflux returned. Odd thing is I can have greek yogurt, cottage cheese and small amounts of cheese without any problems.