Bad Nutrition Labels - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Bad Nutrition Labels



      By Michael F. Jacobson HuffPost Healthy Living

      When nutrition facts became mandatory on packaged foods in 1993, interested consumers could, for the first time, learn how many calories and nutrients were in their foods. Popular, readable, and consumer friendly, nutrition facts labels earned its designer an award for design excellence from President Bill Clinton. Ingredients list, however, were left behind by the nutrition-labeling law. And as useful as nutrition facts labels are, it's increasingly difficult for the truth on the fine print to compete with the omissions, obfuscations, or in some cases, outright falsifications on the fronts of food packages.

      Labels should be clear, honest, and informative -- and reading one shouldn't require the skills of an NSA code-breaker. But too often, companies try to trick people into buying foods that aren't as healthy as the labels pretend.

      Help may be on the way, however, in the form of important legislation introduced by Representatives Frank Pallone (D-NJ) and Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). Their Food Labeling Modernization Act would solve some of the biggest problems with food labels today. It would be a congressional kick in the pants to an agency that probably could be dealing with many of these issues now, but isn't. What follows are some particularly egregious examples of bad labeling that investigators from the Center for Science in the Public Interest found on recent shopping trips.

      Coffee-Mate

      An old country music song says "the big print giveth and the small print taketh away." Here, Nestle has obscured even the small print to the best of its ability, with these tiny, black-on-brown all-CAPS. Hard to find those partially hydrogenated oils you were keeping an eye out for, eh?

      Whole Foods Mighty Multigrain

      We expected more from Whole Foods but instead got these whole grain hijinks with its Mighty Multigrain Small Batch Bread "made with whole grains." White flour is the first ingredient, water the second. Funny that they don't brag that it's "made with water!'

      Land O'Lakes Light Butter

      I can't believe it's not better: Bragging that this Land O'Lakes Light Butter has zero grams of trans fat per serving obscures the fact that this product also contains a slug of heart-harmful saturated fat.

      Arrowhead Mills Chocolate Squares

      Arrowhead Mills says its Whole Grain Chocolate filled Squares cereal is "all natural." At least its first ingredient is whole grain, but another ingredient, alkalized cocoa powder, is only produced in factories and is definitely not "natural."

      Healthy Choice Fettuccini Alfredo Bake

      Maybe the copywriter was baked? This Healthy Choice Fettuccini Alfredo Bake could not be described as "healthy" under the proposed law. To qualify for "healthy," a pasta would have to be at least half whole grains. Here, all the grain is refined white flour.

      Starbucks Coffee Ice Cream

      We'd like to tell you exactly how much caffeine is in this Starbucks ice cream, but we can’t tell by looking at the package. Caffeine isn't disclosed anywhere on the label. But we know from asking the company that it has about 45 milligrams per serving. The bill would require products with more than 10 mg of caffeine to disclose the amount.

      Post Greek Mixed Berry Honey Bunches of Oats

      Count up the various sugars in Post's Greek Mixed Berry Honey Bunches of Oats cereal. The bill would require ingredient lists to lump all sugars together, such as the sugar, corn syrup, brown sugar, honey, and other sugars scattered amidst all the other ingredients. And get out your magnifying glass if you want to find them here. Lumped together, "sugar" would show up higher in the ingredient list. (The suggestion that the cereal contains Greek yogurt is a stretch, considering that its yogurt powders have been heat-treated, killing the cultures that make yogurt yogurt.)

      Hidden Valley Pomegranate Vinaigrette

      You might naively think that the reddish color in Farmhouse Originals Pomegranate Vinaigrette comes from the pomegranate. Sorry. Probably most of the color is artificially added thanks to the annatto, Red 40, and Blue 1. It's perfectly legal that the front label doesn’t disclose the presence of those colorings, but the new legislation would require a front label notice when a food is artificially colored with either synthetic or natural ingredients. Red 40 and Blue 1, by the way, are neurotoxic dyes that exacerbate behavioral problems in some children.

      Kraft Miracle Whip Light

      Consumers are likely aware of the artificial sweeteners used in diet sodas. But who expects one in mayonnaise? Kraft Miracle Whip Light actually has two artificial sweeteners -- sucralose and acesulfame potassium -- which is strange since this product also contains high-fructose corn syrup and sugar. The proposed law would require a front-of-package declaration that this mayo is artificially sweetened.

      Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michae...b_3964313.html
      Comments 8 Comments
      1. rphash49's Avatar
        rphash49 -
        Next we need to get rid of proprietary blends on supplement labels. I want to know exactly what I'm putting in my body
      1. Oscar's Avatar
        Oscar -
        While I am typically against government control over private industry, I would like to see laws concerning nutrition label transparency and full ingredient disclosure, while it won't change most peoples eating habits simply because they don't care it'd be plenty useful for those of us that do
      1. mtinsideout's Avatar
        mtinsideout -
        Originally Posted by rphash49 View Post
        Next we need to get rid of proprietary blends on supplement labels. I want to know exactly what I'm putting in my body
        I didn't read through the article but I agree with you. I hate prop blends that tell you there is caffeine or yohimbine but not how much of each individual ingredient.
      1. MANotaur's Avatar
        MANotaur -
        eh to hell with it all...if you eat fresh produce and kill your own game/meat you dont have to worry about that kind of bullsht.

        try and let the government tell me i cant eat my venison, carrots, cucumbers and greens.

        just my two cents
      1. gkusa001's Avatar
        gkusa001 -
        Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
        While I am typically against government control over private industry, I would like to see laws concerning nutrition label transparency and full ingredient disclosure, while it won't change most peoples eating habits simply because they don't care it'd be plenty useful for those of us that do

        It would definitly make my IIFYM way of eating a lot more accurate. I'd be down with this law/bill but there is just one problem. Congress. They never get anything done unless it benefits them in some way and I'm sure the lobbies for the food industry don't want this to happen. So I just don't see this happening guys and it sucks
      1. MANotaur's Avatar
        MANotaur -
        Originally Posted by gkusa001 View Post
        It would definitly make my IIFYM way of eating a lot more accurate. I'd be down with this law/bill but there is just one problem. Congress. They never get anything done unless it benefits them in some way and I'm sure the lobbies for the food industry don't want this to happen. So I just don't see this happening guys and it sucks
        again...why worry about congress and the govt? if your that concerned about it-stick with fresh produce and wild game. Itll prolly save you an ass ton at the grocery store too
      1. mtinsideout's Avatar
        mtinsideout -
        Originally Posted by MANotaur View Post
        again...why worry about congress and the govt? if your that concerned about it-stick with fresh produce and wild game. Itll prolly save you an ass ton at the grocery store too
        That isn't practical for people who live in the city and suburban areas, they depend on groceries. You don't see wild deer running around NYC lol.
      1. MANotaur's Avatar
        MANotaur -
        Originally Posted by mtinsideout View Post
        That isn't practical for people who live in the city and suburban areas, they depend on groceries. You don't see wild deer running around NYC lol.
        lol i get that! and i understand not everybody can hunt-but in the big city yall have specialty butcher shops that do sell bison, duck, goose, deer, and the like. thats the beauty of it-if its considered a wild animal, chances are you pretty safe with the nutritional content.

        now as for produce-i dont care about the whole organic mumbo jumbo-if its green its good imo. I understand not everybody feels that way but realistically-whether something is organic or not-its not gonna affect the nutritional value to the degree where its gonna screw up somebodies diet. IE organic free-range chicken eggs vs just plain large eggs- the latter has a little bit more healthy fats in the yolk but nothing thats gonna keep you from meeting or over shooting your macros.

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