Aspartame Controversy - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Aspartame Controversy


      By Kelly Dorfman Huffpost Healthy Living

      In April, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study linking diet soda consumption to an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease. Nobody blinked or cared because this research was just going to be thrown on the pile of allegedly conflicting studies about the safety of artificial sweeteners, particularly aspartame. This pile is referred to as the "aspartame controversy."

      Aspartame is the artificial sweetener sold under the brand names of Equal and NutraSweet. It is used commonly in diet sodas because it tastes the most like sugar, or at least that is what the people selling it say. Despite all the hype about controversy, there is no aspartame controversy. All of the aspartame-industry-sponsored research consistently concludes aspartame is safe, while the independent studies overwhelmingly find side effects and problems. There is no gray area between the two sides. Every study connected to those who sell it says aspartame is safe while the independent studies find concerns. The controversy is really over whether research funded by special interest groups is valid.

      Mere mortals, like myself, might be tempted to ignore inconvenient facts if my livelihood or survival were threatened. When I was a teenager, I worked at a family restaurant famous for its generous portions of homemade pies and cheesecake. As a newbie waitress, I was surprised when customers would order dessert while insisting I bring artificial sweetener (saccharine, at that time) with their coffee.

      How could any one believe forgoing the 16 calories in a sugar packet (I looked it up) would balance out the 500-plus calories in the coconut cream pie? Since these customers were kindly funding my college education through generous tips and the base salary at the time was $1.15 an hour, I wisely held my tongue. Instead, I asked them if they wanted whipped cream with their Heath bar cheesecake. ("Just a little," was the usual response.)

      At the time, I did not understand why people were counting calories. I grew up in a rural area in the 70s. Everybody I knew guzzled whole milk, and in my family, ice cream was a food group; yet few people were obese. I remember our amazing high school girls' basketball team. My friend, Nina, was the only one who did not look like she could bench press a Holstein. The girls were tall, fit and strong but there was not a calorie counter among them.

      Now, 30-something years later, the average 9-year-old understands calorie-counting, yet a near obsession level with the content of food only seems to be feeding the weight gain epidemic. Despite easy availability of reduced calorie and artificially sweetened food/beverages we are expanding by the minute so that 68 percent of Americans are now overweight.

      Caloric sweeteners like sugar and corn syrup certainly deserve some of the blame. Their consumption increased almost 40 percent between the 50s and 1999, when peak consumption levels reached a pancreas-busting 155 pounds per person per year -- or 52 teaspoons of sugar a day. Or one of those rain-barrel-sized drinks they sell with your hexane-laced burger at the drive-through. But that is another story. Since 2000, sugar intake has reduced slightly due to a minor decrease in corn-syrup sweetened soda-slurping.

      But the diet drink industry is booming.

      The primary non-caloric sweetener used in diet sodas and teas is aspartame. Obviously, aspartame (introduced in 1974) and its buddies are not helping people lose weight because as a society, the more diet soda we consume, the heavier we seem to get. The reason for this phenomenon has been consistently found in independent research. That is, the taste for sweets, whether delivered by sugar or artificial sweeteners, enhances appetite. The only people who seem to think diet sodas help with weight loss are the manufacturers and some registered dietitians (RDs).

      A majority of RDs recommend artificial sweeteners to their clients. The American Dietetic Association has consistently supported the use of aspartame and in an "evidence-based study" attempted to bust lingering concerns about aspartame. The study reportedly concluded aspartame does not cause side effects, including weight gain. The dietitians claimed to be working independently even though some of the funding for the study came from the aspartame industry. And they want you to know the fact that the aspartame industry has generously supported the ADA through the years has no bearing on their recommendations or research. Pie, anyone?

      Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kelly-...b_1674707.html
      Comments 11 Comments
      1. Flexappeal's Avatar
        Flexappeal -
        It's always helped me!
      1. D3Baseball's Avatar
        D3Baseball -
        This is a bunch of garbage. It's simple pharmacology, it metabolizes into phenylalanine, aspartate, and methanol. The first two are just amino acids and while methanol could be worrisome, extravagant quantities would be necessary.

        The study everyone hails as proof that diet soda is bad is fundamentally flawed as it is correlation based and has no control. There were three groups: no soda, diet soda, and regular soda. The order I named them is the order from lowest weight to highest weight. In other words, people drinking diet soda are typically consuming fewer calories than those that drink sugary soda. Why is no soda "better"? Because people with the will to abstain from soda are much more likely to stay away from ALL sweets.

        Have your artificial sweeteners and diet beverages, just be smart and don't overeat other **** to compensate.
      1. purebred's Avatar
        purebred -
        The amount of misinformation available to the public is staggering:


      1. D3Baseball's Avatar
        D3Baseball -
        Originally Posted by purebred View Post
        The amount of misinformation available to the public is staggering:



        You're missing well over 15 years' worth of studies.

        There's no denying that Monsanto/Searle employs some troubling business tactics, but the truth is that the stuff is safe.
      1. fightbackhxc's Avatar
        fightbackhxc -
        Originally Posted by D3Baseball View Post

        You're missing well over 15 years' worth of studies.

        There's no denying that Monsanto/Searle employs some troubling business tactics, but the truth is that the stuff is safe.
        I'll choose not to drink it. Everyone is always saying hey....a little aspartame won't kill you. Well what about a little BPA a little fluoride,a little mercury, a little pthalates, some parabens, some tastey gmo food,some foods soaked in herbicides pesticides and fungicides, a little meat with some antibiotics and hormones, a little birth control and pharmaceutical residue in your water, a little aspartame, some Teflon toxins in your food....all this compounded severely taxes the liver and makes a mess for our cells. No thanks.
      1. MidwestBeast's Avatar
        MidwestBeast -
        Until they deem that diet soda actually causes weight-gain or health issues by something other than "making you crave sweets," I don't care. Granted, I rarely drink anything other than water, but that logic is horrible. That's like saying that people who hunt are more likely to be serial killers because the hunting caused them to crave killing living things. Stupid.
      1. Facetoface's Avatar
        Facetoface -
        I don't think there is a direct correlation between aspartame and weight gain. People who consume the most aspartame most likely consume the most of eveything else as well. People probably also think they can eat more bad stuff to compensate for their soda being diet. To say it is the 'cause' is like saying that it tends to be hotter in places where people eat the most ice cream and also where crime retes are the highest so therefore ice cream causes crime. May be something to it but I drink diet soda everyday and I have 8% body fat and overall am in good health..
      1. BigMfer's Avatar
        BigMfer -
        Kelly, can get those 5 minutes back please! What is the point of this? I'll summarize everything for you, "Remember the good ole days when we ate what we wanted."
      1. purebred's Avatar
        purebred -
        Originally Posted by fightbackhxc View Post
        I'll choose not to drink it. Everyone is always saying hey....a little aspartame won't kill you. Well what about a little BPA a little fluoride,a little mercury, a little pthalates, some parabens, some tastey gmo food,some foods soaked in herbicides pesticides and fungicides, a little meat with some antibiotics and hormones, a little birth control and pharmaceutical residue in your water, a little aspartame, some Teflon toxins in your food....all this compounded severely taxes the liver and makes a mess for our cells. No thanks.
        +1 for common sense that's not so common
      1. fightbackhxc's Avatar
        fightbackhxc -
        Originally Posted by purebred View Post
        +1 for common sense that's not so common
        Thanks man. the cure for cancer is eliminating these toxins not some pill you can pop.
      1. brutostronzo's Avatar
        brutostronzo -
        Agreed to fightbackhxc ... Better to stay away from this crap altogether and you wont have to care about some study. These days the companies that make our foods are no longer local farms, they are multilibillion dollar corporations and factories... Tomatoes grow under artificial light injected with "enhancers" and as a result you get a tomato the size of a cantelope to gain a heftier pricetag at the checkout stand... Chickens crammed into dark rooms by the thousands injected with hormones, I have read this stresses the animals out causing them to release toxins into their cells which we will later ingest... Who's to say this crap is being manufactured in China like everything else then slap slap some homestyle warm & fuzzy looking label on the product and ship it off... My goal is to find local farms (which are plentiful in the midwest) and stay the hell away from a label that has all kinds of S@##%t that sounds like it is synthesized in a lab just to conserve shelf age.