Powerlifting Vs Bodybuilding - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Powerlifting Vs Bodybuilding



      By Carlon Colker, M.D. Flex

      If building muscle were a simple as pushing or pulling the heaviest weight possible, bodybuilding would be easy. Since that’s basically all powerlifters do, they’d have the most exquisite physiques on earth. But the fact is, they don’t. Most powerlifters are clinically obese (with no muscle definition), perpetually injured, and, astonishingly, only marginally developed by bodybuilding standards. It’s an important subject for my readers to explore because, due to some degree of real strength-to-size correlation, so many of us get drawn by the lure of low repetitions with heavy weights.

      Some experts claim that the diference between bodybuilders and powerlifters centers on the bodybuilder’s desire to “feel” the movement in order to achieve a pump, and thus maximize muscle stimulation. In sharp contrast, the powerlifting goal is to simply lift the maximum amount of pound- age regardless of the form. The idea is to “incorporate” as many muscle groups as pos- sible in order to maximize the poundage moved, as opposed to isolating and hyperstimulating a particular muscle.

      Another aspect—beyond style and execution of form— to consider is the actual diference in training. Bodybuilders train with considerably more volume. In other words, even though a powerlifter may lift more poundage in a single lift during a particular training session, the bodybuilder moves expo- nentially more total poundage. Also, powerlifters take far more rest between sets compared to bodybuilders.

      So again, strength is important, but it’s all about how you define it. You can’t expect the muscles to grow without getting stronger. To help you compare and contrast the substantive training diferences between bodybuilding and power training to understand the dramatic diference in physique development, check out the table below.



      By the way, before all those annoyed e-mails, blog posts, and letters come in from staunch powerlifters, please be advised that I know all too well that the sample routine I posted for power training is not what a typical powerlifter might do preparing for a meet. Rather, it’s reflective of the kind of number-chasing routine one might typically fall into when ego trumps sense.

      When I see guys overreaching on the weights with less-than- impressive muscular development to show for it, I remember the words of the long-since-passed Muscle Beach pundit Dan Duchaine. Eccentric but brilliant in his own way, he used to say, “If you want to impress me, build a 20-inch arm with a 20-pound dumbbell.” He was so right. But it took me quite a while to figure it out. In fact, it took me 20 years, to be exact. I pray it takes you less. - FLEX

      Source: http://www.flexonline.com/training/b...s-powerlifters
      Comments 57 Comments
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by napalm View Post
        Stupidest fcking bunch of words I've ever read. I can't even call it an article.

        I just lifted in the WPC worlds in Prague, the 'clinically obese' lifters were the minority as far as physiques go.

        The days of the fat Powerlifter have been over for quite a few years now. We are in fact putting more emphasis on conditioning now than ever.

        Clearly no research was done prior to assembling this piece of shyt...
        Refer back to post #12 to get clarity. This article wasn't meant for powerlifters anyways.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by compudog View Post
        No kidding, clearly it's just an off the cuff slam at pl. Fact is anybody with a BMI over 30 is "clinically obese", which would include every single (male) person who's ever set foot on the Olympia stage.
        Except that the BMI test clearly footnotes that it isn't accurate for those who have rigourous and regular training of any type. BMI can't be used to measure anyone with any above average level of activity.
      1. napalm's Avatar
        napalm -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        Except that the BMI test clearly footnotes that it isn't accurate for those who have rigourous and regular training of any type. BMI can't be used to measure anyone with any above average level of activity.
        But it is used everyday to determine exactly what you are saying it can't be used for.

        <----had to get nutritional and exercise counseling from my pcp because my bmi was >30

        I've forgotten more about nutrition and training than 99% of clinicians who use bmi in their practice.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by napalm View Post

        But it is used everyday to determine exactly what you are saying it can't be used for.

        <----had to get nutritional and exercise counseling from my pcp because my bmi was >30

        I've forgotten more about nutrition and training than 99% of clinicians who use bmi in their practice.
        I cant comment on what ur experiencing. Every time a doc or nurse calculated my BMI they always told me that they wouldnt have any regard for it because I was lean and it didnt matter. This is also why many clinics will also take BF measurements. The two together are telling, imo but one or the other is pretty worthless.
      1. smoker145's Avatar
        smoker145 -
        Powerlifters goal is to move the maximum amount of poundage regardless of form"

        Lmao you fycking srs?
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by smoker145 View Post
        Powerlifters goal is to move the maximum amount of poundage regardless of form"

        Lmao you fycking srs?
        That should be reworded to "Powerlifters goal is to move the maximum amount of poundage using the most efficient form" or just " to move the max amount of poundage" would have worked too.

        From my understanding, form in powerlifting is everything because the form determines the capability of the lifter. I've seen guys with raw power and crappy form lift alot of weight, but then I've seen guys much smaller, with impeccable form lift as much weight, too.

        Bodybuilding isn't about the most efficient form, it is really about targeting muscles so the form is usually modified in subtle ways to do so. This is one reason bodybuilding lifts are generally lighter to begin with since the form isn't appropriate for max effort lifts.
      1. CincyKiller45's Avatar
        CincyKiller45 -
        Lol at this article. Ridiculous.
      1. CincyKiller45's Avatar
        CincyKiller45 -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post

        Clearly, you haven't performed 65-70% of your 1RM @ 15-25 reps on squats. Do that and you'll likely never make that statement above ever again...
        I've ran the cube method by Brandon Lilly (Powerlifter). The program had me do 1 set of 50 on Olympic squats. Do that statement above and you'll never question if a PL'er incorporates volume again...
      1. Ironwill42's Avatar
        Ironwill42 -
        Just lift.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by CincyKiller45 View Post

        I've ran the cube method by Brandon Lilly (Powerlifter). The program had me do 1 set of 50 on Olympic squats. Do that statement above and you'll never question if a PL'er incorporates volume again...
        U were the one that made the statement that lower reps higher weight was more demanding than the other and somehow coming back with 1 set of 50 as a point to show the difficulty in heavy weight-lifting isnt ringing a bell. Besides, u'd have to go way below 50% of ur 1RM to pull off 50 reps. That isnt really a bodybuilding style as much as an aerobic/endurance training.

        I think I speak for most folks that do regular training of each type that the higher intensity nature of bodybuilding style will tax both the aerobic and anaerobic systems as compared to strength training which dabbles mainly in anaerobic training. Its simply easier to do 3 reps of 90% and rest for 3 minutes than to do 15 reps of 70% and only rest for 90 seconds.
      1. smoker145's Avatar
        smoker145 -
        Look you can argue for bodybuilding and that's cool. But when it comes down to it, I'd like to show off my strength the day I step on the platform and be at my strongest, than be at my weakest like bodybuilders.
      1. CincyKiller45's Avatar
        CincyKiller45 -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post

        U were the one that made the statement that lower reps higher weight was more demanding than the other and somehow coming back with 1 set of 50 as a point to show the difficulty in heavy weight-lifting isnt ringing a bell. Besides, u'd have to go way below 50% of ur 1RM to pull off 50 reps. That isnt really a bodybuilding style as much as an aerobic/endurance training.

        I think I speak for most folks that do regular training of each type that the higher intensity nature of bodybuilding style will tax both the aerobic and anaerobic systems as compared to strength training which dabbles mainly in anaerobic training. Its simply easier to do 3 reps of 90% and rest for 3 minutes than to do 15 reps of 70% and only rest for 90 seconds.
        I never said that, lol. And I don't think lower reps higher weight is less demanding. It's just different. Max out on squat, bench, and deadlift on the same day and tell me how little demanding it was.

        I brought up the 50 rep set to disprove the stigma that powerlifters only lift low reps. My accessory exercises are usually always in the upper rep ranges.

        I have nothing against BB'ers. We're all brothers in iron and I respect the discipline it takes to get to single digit BF levels. I just think this article is dishonest and borderline disrespectful.
      1. mrgoodbar0's Avatar
        mrgoodbar0 -
        This is an ignorant piece simply written to spur site traffic, no one believes it.
      1. Rodja's Avatar
        Rodja -
        BBing isn't a sport; PLing is. That's the difference.
      1. napalm's Avatar
        napalm -
        "...bodybuilding is men on a stage in their underwear wearing brown paint showing other men their muscles. It is training for appearance only, and at the contest level requires a degree of vanity, narcissism and self absorption that I find distasteful and odd"

        -Mark Rippetoe...
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by napalm View Post
        "...bodybuilding is men on a stage in their underwear wearing brown paint showing other men their muscles. It is training for appearance only, and at the contest level requires a degree of vanity, narcissism and self absorption that I find distasteful and odd"

        -Mark Rippetoe...
        You have to try it before understanding it. I dont go up there narcissistic about it. I go up there competitively just like every one else. Its about sculpting and quite honestly, ur right it isnt a sport. It is an art. I can show u exact parallels of bodybuilding and painting or clay/sculpting. The competition is just like an art gallery or showcase. Yet, we get criticized by powerlifters because we have the genetics and confidence and security to do something that they may not. Not everyone can say they have those qualities and typical of americans we tend to tear down those that have what we dont. If it was really just about PL'ers not wanting to do bodybuilding then why the lash out at us?! If u really weren't interested in the qualities of bb'ing then u wouldnt criticize others for it.

        I say stop all the bashing because it only makes one look suspiciously jealous or ignorant about it. I think anyone goes down a slippery slope to say bb isnt a sport while powerlifting or (weight-lifting) is a sport. It doesnt make sense because bb uses weight lifting to accomplish competitiveness in a different venue, much like football, baseball, soccer, mma etc. Powerlifting IS weight-lifting so if anything PL isolates itself from the rest of sport activities. Do u see how this could be argued for days on end?

        This thread didnt lash out at powerlifters, it lashed out a bb'ers trying to do bb'ing with a PL'ing routine. More work is being accomplished under bb'ing routines when calculating the physics and thus more stimulus for muscle growth. Not a hard concept to understand.

        But is that the problem? Or is it that PL'ers want to be perceived as BOTH the biggest AND the strongest? They compliment each other, sure. But tons of muscle development doesnt equal the strongest of the strongest. It just means big muscles and strong. Likewise, strong muscles doesnt equate to the biggest ones either.

        Lets get over ourselves and move on to better, less controversial topics.
      1. napalm's Avatar
        napalm -
        With all due respect, go back and read the first paragraph of that piece of shyt.

        It is totally bashing powerlifters...
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by napalm View Post
        With all due respect, go back and read the first paragraph of that piece of shyt.

        It is totally bashing powerlifters...
        The clinically obese part, yes. The rest, while most likely true, are generalizations about PL'ers and could have been more tactfully written about except the part about pl being easier that isnt true. There is a staunch of arrogance for sure. Bad write up in regards to being tactful and kind about it but regarding the takeaway, which I think was to train differently, was still helpful imo.

        Regardless, all the PL'ers have come in here and for every criticism the author had we've now probably gotten two from Pl'ers directed toward bodybuilding to a point that I'm beginning to wonder if the masses of PL'ers have a chip on their shoulder toward us about it...by responding back that same way as the author did...did it make u any better?

        Just a thought I have as I read through all the lashing out. We're supposed to support each other not hate each other like this. Lets not have this arrogant author ruin the comraderie amongst us.
      1. napalm's Avatar
        napalm -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        The clinically obese part, yes. The rest, while most likely true, are generalizations about PL'ers and could have been more tactfully written about except the part about pl being easier that isnt true. There is a staunch of arrogance for sure. Bad write up in regards to being tactful and kind about it but regarding the takeaway, which I think was to train differently, was still helpful imo. Regardless, all the PL'ers have come in here and for every criticism the author had we've now probably gotten two from Pl'ers directed toward bodybuilding to a point that I'm beginning to wonder if the masses of PL'ers have a chip on their shoulder toward us about it...by responding back that same way as the author did...did it make u any better? Just a thought I have as I read through all the lashing out. We're supposed to support each other not hate each other like this. Lets not have this arrogant author ruin the comraderie amongst us.
        Dude, you've been respectful in your arguments and I appreciate that. But what if some douchebag came in w a shytty bunch of words slamming bb'ing? The shyt storm would still be going on. My comments haven't been out of arrogance, or having a chip on my shoulder. When I see stupidity I call it out for what it is.

        I've sacrificed a lot for this sport, most notably 5 shoulder surgeries, 4 knee surgeries and currently a torn Achilles from worlds last week. When some douche comes in and says we're all fat, have no muscle and don't care about form, well, I take that personally. As do my fellow pl'rs. We're a small, but vocal minority.

        I totally agree w your last sentence.

        :grouphug:
      1. mrgoodbar0's Avatar
        mrgoodbar0 -
        Napalm, I don't even know if I'd give the article any credit at all. Usually the trolls are the ones posting comments - not writing articles - except in this case.

        Seriously, the example of a typical workout was "This is a BB workout, and this is a power lifter testing max weight", it wasn't even the same comparison. The whole thing was completely asinine.