Lessons From The Paleo Diet - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Lessons From The Paleo Diet



      From HuffPost Healthy Living

      Not since paleolithic times has it been so fashionable to eat like a hunter-gatherer.

      While everyone from professional athletes to mommy bloggers seems to be touting the whole food, grain-free, meat-heavy Paleo Diet, it's not without its critics.

      The Paleo Diet -- which also goes by the names "Caveman" or "Stone Age" diet -- advocates eating pre-agrarian foods. If our hunter-gatherer ancestors didn't eat it, Paleo eaters don't want to eat it either. That means no grains, legumes, dairy, alcohol or sugar. Instead, Paleo eaters choose grass-fed beef, lamb and chicken, fish, fruit and vegetables (although many eschew nightshade veggies, like eggplant and tomato). In an ideal Paleo diet, practitioners would stick to wild animals -- which have less fat and saturated fat than farmed -- and forage for plants.

      Following this plan, it is easy to see the appeal: the list of forbidden foods closely resembles the foods Harvard Medical School counsels patients to avoid.

      “Clinical trials have shown that the Paleo Diet is the optimum diet that can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, help with weight loss, reduce acne, promote optimum health and athletic performance," Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Colorado State University professor and author of The Paleo Diet told WebMD.

      Still, critics question the logic of following this eating pattern. After all, humanity thrived after adopting an agrarian way of life.

      "It seems more a gimmick than a well-thought-out scientifically diet plan," says Lawrence Cheskin M.D., FACP, director of Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center. "Remember, we lived to an average of 25 years of age on that diet, so I’m not sure where it is a great plan to follow now."

      Cheskin added that he certainly agreed with some tenants of the diet, including the emphasis on whole, natural foods, but was concerned about the level of meat.

      That echoes the concerns outlined by David Katz, M.D., HuffPost blogger and director of the Yale Prevention Research Center, who wrote that he worried dieters might confuse supermarket meat with the healthful game of yore:

      Modern meat is not Stone Age meat. There were no wild corned beef, salamis or pastramis in the Stone Age, so processed meat is certainly off the Paleo diet menu. There were no grain-fed cattle; no pigs fed slop; and no domesticated feed animals raised without demands on their muscles, either.

      What's more, according to a U.S. News and World Report analysis, a panel of doctors and nutritionists determined that the diet was not a good choice for curtailing diabetes, improving heart health or losing weight.

      But regardless of how you feel about Paleo, there are some tips and lessons that just about anyone can get behind.

      1 Avoid Processed Foods

      This is Paleo orthodoxy, but it is also general nutritional advice from Michael "Eat Food" Pollan to Harvard's School of Public Health: Consuming whole foods, as close to nature as possible, is healthful.

      2 Pair Diet With Exercise

      Paleo has a close connection to CrossFit -- the intense HIIT program. And while the "sport of fitness" isn't for everyone, the idea that a diet and exercise plan should be part of a whole healthy lifestyle approach is a good one: Research shows that emphasizing the two together is the best way to achieve weight loss.

      3 Achieve A Good Salt Balance

      By eliminating processed foods, which are the major source of sodium in the American diet, Paleo eaters eat a low-sodium diet without even trying. What's more, the plan provides nearly twice the typical amount of potassium that a typical American diet contains. That combination of low sodium and high potassium is a recipe for good vascular health and low blood pressure.

      4 Choose Good Fats

      The Paleo diet eschews hydrogenated vegetable oils in favor of single source fats like avocados, olive oil, flaxseed oil and coconut oil.

      5 Cook For Yourself

      Strict eating guidelines make restaurant dining and quick snacks at the vending machine a little trickier. That means most of the food you eat comes from your own kitchen. And that means you know exactly what's in it and how it will affect your body.

      6 Don't Count Calories

      Paleolithic hunter-gatherers certainly didn't, goes the reasoning. While calories do count -- if you eat a huge number of them, you will gain weight -- they are not a metric of healthfulness. Nutritionists agree that calories are merely a jumping off point toward looking at the health value of food. Nutrient density is a far better measure for health.

      Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3900690.html
      Comments 28 Comments
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by Matthersby View Post
        Kind of like when someone talks about their crossfit gym like its a holy place or how 'ripped' cromag man was?!?!
        Yeah Crossfit folks are kinda gungho about their training. I think its a place for people that failed or struggle to get physique-transforming results. They usually are jus caught up in perfomance lifting numbers and not overall physical health, including what the body looks like on the inside such as cholesterol, inflammation, etc etc.
      1. Matthersby's Avatar
        Matthersby -
        Costco and home-grown veggies is the best I can do for now. :(
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Not to beat on a dead horse, but here is a nicely put article on gluten-intolerances and the misconceptions as well as the facts - http://business.time.com/2013/03/13/...ten-free-food/

        I'm not discounting the fact that people have a mild form of gluten intolerance and others worse with Celiac disease, but those two combined make up less than 7% of all people in the U.S. Now why in the world nearly 1/3 of all people in the U.S. are following this gluten-free protocol I cannot understand. I think this article has a good explanation:

        Balzer thinks the gluten-free craze is an evolution and an expansion of the low-carb trend. Unlike a dietary modification that affects only a fraction of the population, like cutting out certain foods to reduce cholesterol, framing the gluten issue as being about “wellness” makes it inclusive enough that everyone can participate. “Digestive health has become a buzzword of how to deal with health in America today,” Balzer says. Probiotics are another popular food trend that fits the wellness category.

        “We’ve come to address health as something beyond removal” of ingredients, he says. In other words, we’ve abandoned the idea of deprivation and decided that instead of simply eating less to feel better and be healthy, we’ll just eat different stuff. “The concept of being on a diet is, I think, losing favor even if you are watching what you eat,” Balzer says. “It’s so much easier for Americans to say I’m concerned with wellness — I’m on a gluten-free diet.’”

        ^^^Sounds exactly like the Paleo Diet. Dont limit your intake, just change what you can eat...
      1. Matthersby's Avatar
        Matthersby -
        Just personal opinion also. I don't believe the problem is gluten, really... It's the GMO wheat it came from. When I eat Ezekiel vs. Subway bread, I can tell you its two different universes. I just made a decision because bulking at my new job requires far less carbs and I can easily survive on brown rice, quinoa, oats, yams and greens. I would have no other reason to avoid gluten if it didn't cause indigestion for me. I think its insanity to join a fad diet for long term health or even body composition. Too many variables for each individual.
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by Matthersby View Post
        Just personal opinion also. I don't believe the problem is gluten, really... It's the GMO wheat it came from. When I eat Ezekiel vs. Subway bread, I can tell you its two different universes. I just made a decision because bulking at my new job requires far less carbs and I can easily survive on brown rice, quinoa, oats, yams and greens. I would have no other reason to avoid gluten if it didn't cause indigestion for me. I think its insanity to join a fad diet for long term health or even body composition. Too many variables for each individual.
        That's a good thought to consider. I am sort of dredding the Daniel's Fast that I am coming up on (a 3 week fast) that calls for no breads whatsoever except Ezekial bread, along with no artificual sweeteners, processed foods of any sort. It's pretty much a vegetarian's diet on steroids. However, mine will be modified to accept one large serving of chicken per day and BCAA's in the form of XTEND powder.

        I think you may be right about it though because Jay Cutler eats Ezekial bread only, too.

        It's gonna be an interesting find to see what 3500+ calories per day of fruits & veggies only will look like, lol.
      1. Matthersby's Avatar
        Matthersby -
        I'm almost 240 and I have to drop down to 3500 on off days 70/15/15. Its crazy when you sit all day at work how little carbs you need to bulk at 35yo. Are you competing again?
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        Originally Posted by Matthersby View Post
        I'm almost 240 and I have to drop down to 3500 on off days 70/15/15. Its crazy when you sit all day at work how little carbs you need to bulk at 35yo. Are you competing again?
        I plan to compete again next year. Probably late next year like August thru October. I still need to pack on about 20lbs of mass before cutting. When I decide to cut, I'm gonna do it slow and steady to preserve every ounce of hard-earned muscle mass. Something like a 16 week cut, with each 4 week phase getting more intense.

        If I can do it correctly, I hope to be show ready w/ 7% BF @ 178-180lbs. I'm only 5'5" so you can understand that 180lbs = 17" arms, 26" legs and 44" chest. BTW, thats a full 30lbs heavier than what I was last time I competed, lol. So while I took off 24 months, I essentially will have averaged 15lbs of lean gains per year. At this rate I would be knocking on the door of the 200lb club within 3-4 years from now.
      1. Matthersby's Avatar
        Matthersby -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        When I decide to cut, I'm gonna do it slow and steady to preserve every ounce of hard-earned muscle mass. Something like a 16 week cut, with each 4 week phase getting more intense.
        Brilliant, be sure to log this as I will be doing it similarly for MP. I'm getting fat but 20 weeks should do fine.
        At 6'3 I will be happy to go up there @ 230 lbs. I'd have to be competing at 275 to do what you're doing and stand a chance!
        Don't forget to log!

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