Bringing Up Lagging Legs - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Bringing Up Lagging Legs



      By Brandon Hahn Athletic Xtreme

      Youíre goal is to build massive legs. Here you sit exhausted with poor results. Itís not your fault. You didnít know the secrets to ďdem gainzĒ that people are talking about. There is such emphasis on other muscles and adding so much complexity that the legs are often overlooked. A 12-20 set workout designed solely for your chest and around the same amount of sets for your entire legs! The quadriceps and hamstrings are such complex structures, not to mention the calves, and yet they get the leftovers. Gains are here, itís time to get some!

      There apparently was a time when the workout gods all sat down and decided we would all follow a 5-day split. Chest, back, legs, shoulders, and finish with arms. This would work fine for a beginner. Depending on the exercises chosen, it might be a great split. However, most fall short of designing a great workout. Itís not your fault, itís simply all of the magazines telling you the 5-day approach is whatís best. When laying out that workout, you should easily see what is wrong.

      There is very little focus on separating your legs into two separate days. The hamstrings often get neglected because they are on the back of the leg and often covered by shorts. When training these two large muscle groups together, it is not easy to muster up enough energy to train them both properly. One often gets whatís left in the tank. Well, their facebook status now says ďsingleĒ! They are no longer a couple, in fact I just saw Hamstrings pickiní up chicks last night! A little much, but hey you laughed.

      Alright, the workout below does still focus on both quadriceps and hamstrings in each workout. The goal is to work the primary or dominant muscle in the first part of the workout. Simply altering your hamstrings exercises and quad exercises from week to week would suffice. However, if all other major muscle groups get there own day, then it is time for your ďlegsĒ to get the same treatment. Once they catch up or surpass your other muscles, you can back off.

      Hamstring Dominant Workout
      Deadlifts 3 sets 4-6 reps
      Good Mornings 3 sets 6-8 reps
      Lying Leg Curls 3 sets 6-8 reps
      Front Squats 5 sets 10 reps
      Leg Extensions 3 sets 10 reps
      Standing Calf Raises 3 sets 10 reps

      Quad Dominant Workout
      Squats 3 sets 4-6 reps
      Front Squats 3 sets 6-8 reps
      Leg Press 3 sets 6-8 reps
      Stiff-Legged Deadlifts 5 sets 10 reps
      Lying Leg Curls 3 sets 10 reps
      Seated Calf Raises 3 sets 10 reps

      Note: These would ideally be separated by at least 48 hours, or longer. Ideally, youíd do hamstrings dominant on Monday and quad dominant on Thursday or Friday.

      There you have it, leg domination at itís finest! Remember to go heavy and follow the rep layout. If you get less than the lower end of the range, lighten the weight. If you get more than the high end of the rep range, increase the weight. It should also be noted that IF you get more than the high end of the rep range, CONTINUE REPPING IT OUT. Thatís your set, own it, and own the fact that next time you will use more weight. Donít waste the set because of a miscalculation (or however you are determining these numbers). Itís time to get started.

      Source: http://www.athleticx.net/articles/ho...-lagging-legs/
      Comments 43 Comments
      1. Tampoco's Avatar
        Tampoco -
        There are dozens of viable options. I like the simplicity of 5/3/1 or stronglifts 5x5. Just have a look around and see what you can commit to. Cardio isn't a bad thing, but if you're not POUNDING calories your bodyweight and training numbers won't improve. You must eat to grow!

        Lift heavy 3-5 times a week with full ROM on the main compound moves and you'll be fine. The little moves don't mean much. Lol the convo about the unimportance of little moves is what got me talking in this thread to begin with.

        I'm a CSCS for whatever that's worth.
      1. AllPump3dUp's Avatar
        AllPump3dUp -
        Originally Posted by Tampoco View Post
        There are dozens of viable options. I like the simplicity of 5/3/1 or stronglifts 5x5. Just have a look around and see what you can commit to. Cardio isn't a bad thing, but if you're not POUNDING calories your bodyweight and training numbers won't improve. You must eat to grow!

        Lift heavy 3-5 times a week with full ROM on the main compound moves and you'll be fine. The little moves don't mean much. Lol the convo about the unimportance of little moves is what got me talking in this thread to begin with.

        I'm a CSCS for whatever that's worth.
        Check your inbox bro!!!! I sent you some mail!
      1. girthypiece's Avatar
        girthypiece -
        Originally Posted by Tampoco View Post

        Hey

        I don't have any experience with restriction training, but I imagine it hurts like hell. I do worry about vein thrombosis and or compartment syndrome, but I would love to see accelerated gains in the hams and calves.

        What has your experience been with the method?
        Following a surgery that left me unable to lift for several months, I incorporated as much BFR training as possible initially. Because I was limited I tried training calves a couple times per week. The protocol is to wrap just below the knee or above the knee if the former is intolerable on a 7/10 scale, 10 being instant pins and needles. I used extra long wrist wraps. 4 sets (30, 15, 15, 15) with 30-45 seconds rest with about 30% of your 1rm. I did seated and standing calves with only 50-75 lbs resistance. It has been the only way I could achieve a "pump" in my calves and if I were ever to train calves again, I would not train them without this protocol.
        BFR is currently being studied as a means of increasing arterial compliance in the elderly. I would highly encourage it, and would consider it very safe if done correctly.

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