Music Lowers Testosterone - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Music Lowers Testosterone


      From Ergo Log

      Lots of athletes like to train to music. That's not so surprising, as music banishes fatigue and reduces pain, facts that have been known since Aristotle. But in 2001 the Japanese endocrinologist Hajime Fukui published the results of a study that might cause you to wonder if there isn't another side to the coin when it comes to training with music. Fukui discovered that music lowers testosterone levels, in men at least.

      Fukui, who works at the Nara University of Education, did an experiment with seventy students aged from 19-25. Half of the students were women and half were men. Fukui got them all to listen to music for 30 minutes.

      Ten students listened in the afternoon to their personal favourite music, ten listened to cantatas sung by Gregorian monks, ten to music that was popular at that moment, ten to Mozart's Sonata in D Major, K. 448, ten to jazz and twenty didnít listen to any music at all. Each of the groups consisted of equal numbers of men and women.

      Fukui took a saliva sample from each of his subjects before and after they listened to the music, and measured the concentration of testosterone in the saliva. He discovered that listening to music raised the concentration of testosterone in the women [first figure below], but that it lowered the concentration of testosterone in men [second figure below]. The concentration of testosterone in saliva gives an indication of the concentration of testosterone in the blood.





      Fukui interprets his results from an evolutionary theory perspective. He thinks that humans invented music to make living and working together in groups easier. The high level of testosterone in men, which is accompanied by aggression and more or less continuous sex drive, is an impediment to this, and music helps.

      Fukui did not look at what music does to men and women who train. But if they react in the same way as the subjects in this study, then natural male athletes may be reducing their progression by training to background music.

      Among the women, the testosterone boosting effect was strongest among those who listened to music of their own choice.

      Among the men, listening to their own choice of music was what lowered their testosterone levels the most. The damage to the men was confined by listening to Gregorian music. Perhaps not quite the musical accompaniment you'd choose for your workout.

      Source:
      Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001 Jun; 930:448-51.

      Source: http://www.ergo-log.com/music-lowers...one-level.html
      Comments 48 Comments
      1. railgun's Avatar
        railgun -
        At this point, I would like to quote one of the forum users (sorry, can't remember who it was):
        Too many guys get caught up in little number pieces like serum levels of ___ which sound meaningful. But they aren't if they don't actually have effect on body composition. That's why a lot of supplements turn out to be moderately useless, because they are based on research that shows blood markers for ___ to go up or down, but almost never on studies that show actual body composition changes.
      1. railgun's Avatar
        railgun -
        @slappy:
        so you're saying I should grab some AK-47 instead dumbbells when working out biceps ? :D
      1. Slappy244's Avatar
        Slappy244 -
        Originally Posted by railgun View Post
        @slappy:
        so you're saying I should grab some AK-47 instead dumbbells when working out biceps ? :D
        According to that study, yes. Maybe skip the pre and clean a weapon. Or do curls with a .50cal. Even if the bump in T level is too small to do anything you'll still look lika a haus.





        (yeah! 400th post!)
      1. purebred's Avatar
        purebred -
        Originally Posted by mtinsideout View Post

        Good lord man it can't be that bad?
        No. It is.
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Must say that this study needs to be re-examined as times have definitely changed. Your mood and focus are baselines of how a workout will go. Everyone has that one track that sends chills up their spine and changes the game. I believe there is even a study examining the tempo associated with the music played as it pertains to exertion in a workout segment. But to each his own
      1. EatMoar's Avatar
        EatMoar -
        Originally Posted by TheMovement View Post
        Must say that this study needs to be re-examined as times have definitely changed. Your mood and focus are baselines of how a workout will go. Everyone has that one track that sends chills up their spine and changes the game. I believe there is even a study examining the tempo associated with the music played as it pertains to exertion in a workout segment. But to each his own
        There have been countless of studies proving music changes moods. Study to classical music for a mental increase is just like lifting to heavy metal.
      1. railgun's Avatar
        railgun -
        Technically lifting and heavy metal are inseparable combo, 'cos you mostly lift metal things, and they are usually heavy :D
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Very true and their even peer reviewed in several journals (Had to find citable sources lol), shame this one ever made it on to a website. Not a bad experiment but times have definitely changed and so has the human mindset.

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