Starting Off In Crossfit - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Starting Off In Crossfit


      By Myles Worthington Men's Fitness

      Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past five years, you’re probably at least somewhat familiar with CrossFit. What might not be clear is how the program differs from the gym workouts you’re already doing. Well, that’s easy. First off, CrossFit is a community of athletes. These athletes vary in terms of age, sex, and fitness level, but they share a common goal: getting fitter, faster, and stronger—and ok, looking better never hurt anybody either. Next, CrossFit training focuses on functional movements that help you perform everyday activities, and its athletes hold one another accountable for increasing speed and weight to consistently make the moves more challenging as fitness levels improve.

      Itching to try something new, but still not sure if CrossFit is the best training program for you? We’ve answered some of the most common questions that beginners ask before joining a box.

      How do I start CrossFit?

      Once you’re equipped with the basics—an open mind and willingness to put in the work—look for a box that offers the first session free of charge, so you can give CrossFit a try without full-on commitment. In an intro session, new athletes are introduced to CrossFit’s most basic movements, lifts, and workout of the day (WOD) formats so that they have a general understanding of what’s to come when they join.

      If you decide CrossFit’s for you, your next step will be to sign up for a beginners class, usually labeled “fundamentals,” “elements,” or “on-ramping.” In these classes, you’ll learn the proper technique for performing key CrossFit moves such as burpees, handstands, box jumps, pull ups, and push ups. Then you’ll move on to Olympic lift technique, learning proper form for moves like squats, deadlifts, presses, and clean and jerks. As you advance in your training, you’ll work at improving these movements (and adding on others), but these basics will be the building blocks of all future WODs.

      How fit should I be before I begin?

      “The greatest thing about CrossFit is that it’s for everybody,” says Nate Forster, CrossFit coach and competitor, and owner of Reebok CrossFit 5th Ave and Reebok CrossFit Miami Beach. “CrossFit is supposed to get you in shape—you don’t have to get in shape to start CrossFit. All WODs are scaled to a level that you can do, and you work to go heavier, faster, and longer. We start at your level and go up. The biggest step is walking in, and once you do, you’ll be hooked.”

      I have a hectic work schedule. Is CrossFit a huge time commitment?

      No. An hour a day is all you need to squeeze in a CrossFit session. A 60-minute class typically begins with a stretching/warm-up portion, moves on to a strength/lifting segment, and closes out with a conditioning WOD.

      How much money is CrossFit going to cost me?

      On average, a membership will run about $200 a month. That may seem like a lot at first, but many athletes choose to cancel their gym memberships when they commit to CrossFit. Plus, most boxes offer deals when you sign up for multiple months at a time or enroll with a spouse or family member, so look into all available discounts before forking over your first payment.

      What kind of results can I expect?

      Increased strength, improved cardiovascular stamina, and greater flexibility are some of the physical results that you can expect after starting CrossFit. But beyond that, you’ll likely feel healthier and more confident in everything you do. When you routinely take time to put your body through new challenges, you might be surprised by how that practice helps you out with the non-physical hurdles you face throughout the day.

      Source: http://www.mensfitness.com/leisure/s...-a-crossfitter
      Comments 36 Comments
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Ive never seen a CrossFit routine that was ever 20mins long and that wouldn't be logical and accepted as a true training program. Comparing it to Insanity or P90x is insulting after personally having done all three types of training methods. People use them for different activities and "REAL" CrossFit lies to the core of being Physically the biggest dog in the pound! It incorporates strength, endurance, and flexibility which helps ex athletes and "weekend warriors" compete on a level that isnt Strongman or Bodybuilding. From when it started, many Noobs jumping into activities and hurting themselves to now, actual Gyms and trainers that specialize in CrossFit its a great outlet. If you do CrossFit more power to you and I hope you all the best and would love to see your numbers, but please dont Compare one sport to another in this fitness realm.
      1. Xfit10's Avatar
        Xfit10 -
        I am an avid crossfitter, I say to each his own! I love to crossfit and i loved to lift some heavy weights...heavy for me anyways. Bodybuilding and crossfit surely are two different sports with different goals. I don't attend a crossfit box but i know that just about every box incorporates strength training like Wendler or juggernaut. I have been crossfitting for about 1.5 years and I one strength gain I have is my deadlift when I started crossfit I struggled with 315 now I'm up to 425. I just recently stared Wendler so i have to attribute that strength gain to crossfit. I expect it to go up more now that I have incorporated 5/3/1. My stats in my profile are current with the exception of deadlift.
      1. huggy77's Avatar
        huggy77 -
        all joking aside, i think crossfit gets a pretty bad name from the knuckleheads not doing it right.... I also think AM knows that a good crossfit article equals lots of posts, lol....
      1. Xfit10's Avatar
        Xfit10 -
        Originally Posted by huggy77 View Post
        all joking aside, i think crossfit gets a pretty bad name from the knuckleheads not doing it right.... I also think AM knows that a good crossfit article equals lots of posts, lol....
        Agreed
      1. DYEL89's Avatar
        DYEL89 -
        Originally Posted by liftstrong View Post
        I am a Crossfit trainer i work at a box and here is the thing There is real Crossfit and "Beachball Crossfit" Real Crossfit has purpose behind the programing, If i write a workout i look at what we are planning for the week and the month so it will fit in with our overall goals, we also do skill work before hand every day, make sure athletes are becoming more efficient in all movements,and we track people progress. My athletes represent the Quality of my gym and the ability of my trainers. NOW beach ball crossfit is unregulated nonsense that you see in these "crossfit fail" youtube videos. For anyone who gave it a Crossfit a go and ended up playing beach ball im sorry. But there are good gyms with good trainers out there. I have been involved with Crossfit for going on 3 years, i have never tore, pulled, strained anything.
        This is my issue with crossfit. It's not focused on the individual, its a group thing. So if Joe Schmo over here has a weaker, less developed chest than Bob, but Bob has tiny, weak arms, nothing is done to individualize the training. Everyone does the same WOD and their "goals" are whatever the 'trainer' draws up. Crossfit would be a 100% viable program if: 1.) you cut out the time clock. People shouldnt have to race through olympic lifts just to beat some time constraint. Time the rests, thats totally understandable. 2.) Focus on quality over quantity. Too many of these "WODs" tell you "do x amount of reps followed by x amount of reps in x amount of time," well heres the issue. What if i cant do x amount of reps? Thats where ****ty form and cheating comes in, and therefore, injuries.
      1. Wrivest's Avatar
        Wrivest -
        Originally Posted by DYEL89 View Post

        This is my issue with crossfit. It's not focused on the individual, its a group thing. So if Joe Schmo over here has a weaker, less developed chest than Bob, but Bob has tiny, weak arms, nothing is done to individualize the training. Everyone does the same WOD and their "goals" are whatever the 'trainer' draws up. Crossfit would be a 100% viable program if: 1.) you cut out the time clock. People shouldnt have to race through olympic lifts just to beat some time constraint. Time the rests, thats totally understandable. 2.) Focus on quality over quantity. Too many of these "WODs" tell you "do x amount of reps followed by x amount of reps in x amount of time," well heres the issue. What if i cant do x amount of reps? Thats where ****ty form and cheating comes in, and therefore, injuries.
        And here is the issue with people who haven't been to a legit CF gym. CF is individualized training that utilizes a group setting as a motivator. Somewhere, people got the misconception that all people in a CF gym HAVE TO use the same weight. That is false! Many people scale weights to what they can handle. Also, if you are new at a movement, many of those can be scaled for training/learning as well. Where did the whole "CF is bootcamp" mentality come from??
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Originally Posted by Wrivest View Post
        And here is the issue with people who haven't been to a legit CF gym. CF is individualized training that utilizes a group setting as a motivator. Somewhere, people got the misconception that all people in a CF gym HAVE TO use the same weight. That is false! Many people scale weights to what they can handle. Also, if you are new at a movement, many of those can be scaled for training/learning as well. Where did the whole "CF is bootcamp" mentality come from??
        Amen, its apart of being man enough to know what weights and activities will push your overall fitness level higher and acknowledging what weights will set you back. Common sense is often left at the door lol. Do your best in the allotted time frame and shot to beat that time next week, month, and so on.
      1. liftstrong's Avatar
        liftstrong -
        Originally Posted by DYEL89 View Post
        This is my issue with crossfit. It's not focused on the individual, its a group thing. So if Joe Schmo over here has a weaker, less developed chest than Bob, but Bob has tiny, weak arms, nothing is done to individualize the training. Everyone does the same WOD and their "goals" are whatever the 'trainer' draws up. Crossfit would be a 100% viable program if: 1.) you cut out the time clock. People shouldnt have to race through olympic lifts just to beat some time constraint. Time the rests, thats totally understandable. 2.) Focus on quality over quantity. Too many of these "WODs" tell you "do x amount of reps followed by x amount of reps in x amount of time," well heres the issue. What if i cant do x amount of reps? Thats where ****ty form and cheating comes in, and therefore, injuries.
        we have single modality heavy days where we will do nothing but 1 movement (cleans, squats, jerks etc) we go over the fundamentals as whole then break up into small groups of 4-5 and work until every athlete has been worked with 1v1. we scale work outs aswell 1 workout will have 3 levels of varying weight and modified movements to accommodate less advance athletes. AND WE MONITOR EVERYTHING i have notebooks i record all my athletes progress in, This way if they are struggling with something i know what they are doing wrong and need to change.
      1. btworth's Avatar
        btworth -
        Gotta say I'm glad to know that there is some organization and personalization to crossfit. My only experience with cfers has been in gyms with people who have zero training. Thanks for info.
      1. Schmeezie863's Avatar
        Schmeezie863 -
        Originally Posted by pmdied View Post
        $200/month, for basically an exercise class. My gym costs $20. I'd save up 3-6 months worth and go hire a good trainer to show me the basics of strength training if I were "new" to any sort of program that involved barbell use.

        ^^ this.. If it takes a room full of hyped of people and tony Horton yelling at you to achieve your goals then they a most likely short term. Fitness,training, exercise, w.e you call it shouldn't be an activity or hobby, it should be a lifestyle. God gave you ONE body and you should get the full benefit of it. Dnt do it BC you pay an absurd fee each month, do it BC you just f-ing should. If you disagree w me, fine. Save yourself the money and buy some d-Bol and tren and get better results than a $200/month CLASS. Also, pretty sure these crossfit instructors are NOT qualified or licensed to give Personalized nutrition plans, biggest part of results.. Get an RD with an NASM certification, probably cheaper.lol
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Originally Posted by Schmeezie863 View Post
        ^^ this.. If it takes a room full of hyped of people and tony Horton yelling at you to achieve your goals then they a most likely short term. Fitness,training, exercise, w.e you call it shouldn't be an activity or hobby, it should be a lifestyle. God gave you ONE body and you should get the full benefit of it. Dnt do it BC you pay an absurd fee each month, do it BC you just f-ing should. If you disagree w me, fine. Save yourself the money and buy some d-Bol and tren and get better results than a $200/month CLASS. Also, pretty sure these crossfit instructors are NOT qualified or licensed to give Personalized nutrition plans, biggest part of results.. Get an RD with an NASM certification, probably cheaper.lol
        Must say you don't seem knowledgeable on this one. I have YET to see a monthly subscription to a CrossFit gym thats $200 and month. Be serious thats more than alot of peoples car insurance. Secondly Training and exercise are hobbies overall total body wellness and fitness are a lifestyle Its for the individual to choose. The idea that buying sup's to make up for a lack of training is sad as the benefits from proper CF instruction can take an individual to new wellness levels both physically and mentally when including the group atmosphere. now the dietitian couldn't hurt but after awhile you know what energy sources fuel your body the best.

        3 gyms I know of all a hike away are fairly cheap $30-80 a month, and the most expensive is a sports complex that does strongman training as well, but VA is alot different than Florida or California. Supplements should only enhance and help you reach a goal and shouldn't be relied upon and I think training with a group of like minded individuals can boosts self confidence and makes the workout easier to stick with.
      1. pmdied's Avatar
        pmdied -
        Originally Posted by TheMovement View Post

        Must say you don't seem knowledgeable on this one. I have YET to see a monthly subscription to a CrossFit gym thats $200 and month. Be serious thats more than alot of peoples car insurance. Secondly Training and exercise are hobbies overall total body wellness and fitness are a lifestyle Its for the individual to choose. The idea that buying sup's to make up for a lack of training is sad as the benefits from proper CF instruction can take an individual to new wellness levels both physically and mentally when including the group atmosphere. now the dietitian couldn't hurt but after awhile you know what energy sources fuel your body the best.

        3 gyms I know of all a hike away are fairly cheap $30-80 a month, and the most expensive is a sports complex that does strongman training as well, but VA is alot different than Florida or California. Supplements should only enhance and help you reach a goal and shouldn't be relied upon and I think training with a group of like minded individuals can boosts self confidence and makes the workout easier to stick with.
        In his defense, I'm in northern NJ so rents, overhead, etc are pretty high which would push the price up in that range.
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Used Google It to be "sure" and 2x a week monthly fees are $125, and unlimited member price is $149 so $1500 for the year, but they cover the live events and help keep you involved in the network. Its really no different than an Athlete paying for a combine conditioning specialist or attending any sport specific gym. I do see that northern prices are almost triple what Ive seen though. Thats nuts but you get what you pay for. I love how location is everything lol

        Just found another one in NJ with an $180/month fee so yea its steep but Im guessing you guys get paid well to match the inflation levels around you. Lemme know as I am looking to move for grad school and that kind of info does help.
      1. Schmeezie863's Avatar
        Schmeezie863 -
        Originally Posted by TheMovement View Post
        Must say you don't seem knowledgeable on this one. I have YET to see a monthly subscription to a CrossFit gym thats $200 and month. Be serious thats more than alot of peoples car insurance. Secondly Training and exercise are hobbies overall total body wellness and fitness are a lifestyle Its for the individual to choose. The idea that buying sup's to make up for a lack of training is sad as the benefits from proper CF instruction can take an individual to new wellness levels both physically and mentally when including the group atmosphere. now the dietitian couldn't hurt but after awhile you know what energy sources fuel your body the best.

        3 gyms I know of all a hike away are fairly cheap $30-80 a month, and the most expensive is a sports complex that does strongman training as well, but VA is alot different than Florida or California. Supplements should only enhance and help you reach a goal and shouldn't be relied upon and I think training with a group of like minded individuals can boosts self confidence and makes the workout easier to stick with.

        I'm not trying to disrespect or discredit your title and affiliation with crossfit. I am saying that if people are going to spend that kind of $$$ they should be getting attention from both aspects (exercise & nutrition). The RD would not only help for finding better energy sources from food but MANY other aspects: Nutrogenomics, eating plans based on the individuals goals, and also providing Scientifically Proven Case Studies on nutrition and exercise related plans that work. Along with all that they are your PERSONAL goto source for anything you need regarding you training and nutrition. 2 months getting a certification is great, don't get me wrong. However, going to school for four years and taking all the chemistry classes to understand how different foods and nutrients work in your body at a cellular level is where you not only inform your client but where you can TEACH and help them understand WHY and HOW their body utilizes the things they put in their body. My argument is this: The money spent on this glorified program can be better spent on personal attention from a Licensed, Accredited, and Certified individual. Now that insurance companies have classified Obesity as a Disease some companies will actually pay for the RD.

        BTW 3 months left of interning and I get the RD on my name, after the state exam.
      1. TheMovement's Avatar
        TheMovement -
        Originally Posted by Schmeezie863 View Post
        I'm not trying to disrespect or discredit your title and affiliation with crossfit. I am saying that if people are going to spend that kind of $$$ they should be getting attention from both aspects (exercise & nutrition). The RD would not only help for finding better energy sources from food but MANY other aspects: Nutrogenomics, eating plans based on the individuals goals, and also providing Scientifically Proven Case Studies on nutrition and exercise related plans that work. Along with all that they are your PERSONAL goto source for anything you need regarding you training and nutrition. 2 months getting a certification is great, don't get me wrong. However, going to school for four years and taking all the chemistry classes to understand how different foods and nutrients work in your body at a cellular level is where you not only inform your client but where you can TEACH and help them understand WHY and HOW their body utilizes the things they put in their body. My argument is this: The money spent on this glorified program can be better spent on personal attention from a Licensed, Accredited, and Certified individual. Now that insurance companies have classified Obesity as a Disease some companies will actually pay for the RD.

        BTW 3 months left of interning and I get the RD on my name, after the state exam.
        Congrats and hope you knock it out of the ballpark, sadly now a days when you hear the name wellness coach its some halfwit that took a two-day online test and somehow knows all about nutrition. Ugh it kills me and yes I believe if you can find the info all in one place awesome. Individuals who take pride in how nutrients fuel an individual on a genetic level are few and far between, the same for people who actually go search for information from accredited peer reviewed studies. Definitely glad to know this is a passion of yours.
      1. Schmeezie863's Avatar
        Schmeezie863 -
        Originally Posted by TheMovement View Post
        Congrats and hope you knock it out of the ballpark, sadly now a days when you hear the name wellness coach its some halfwit that took a two-day online test and somehow knows all about nutrition. Ugh it kills me and yes I believe if you can find the info all in one place awesome. Individuals who take pride in how nutrients fuel an individual on a genetic level are few and far between, the same for people who actually go search for information from accredited peer reviewed studies. Definitely glad to know this is a passion of yours.
        Thanks man. Keep up the good work. Respect

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