Late Night Carbs - Good Or Bad? - AnabolicMinds.com
    • Late Night Carbs - Good Or Bad?


      By Jeremey DuVall, M.S., CPT Men's Fitness

      Q: Are carbohydrates bad to eat before bed?

      A: Across the fitness and nutrition spectrum, carbohydrates have been demonized as instigators of weight gain, particularly before bed. A general nutrition rule emerged to forego carbohydrates once the sun went down to preserve a thin waistline and prevent an expanding midsection. Contrary to the opinion of many, carbohydrates are an essential part of any diet but does consuming them before bed really predispose you to seeing higher numbers on the scale?

      In most cases, the public fear of carbohydrates stems from misunderstanding. Nate Miyaki, author of the Intermittent Feast, acknowledges that they can be good or bad depending on the situation – adding to the public confusion. “Carbohydrates can help us recover from strenuous, anaerobic activity, or they can cause us to fatten up during periods of inactivity. All of the scenarios depend on activity.” In short, for high-intensity activities lifters deplete glycogen stores and need to replenish them to perform optimally. In other situations of low-intensity or no activity, the body has plenty of carbohydrate stores and thus extra intake isn’t needed. Miyaki likens carbohydrate feeding to fueling up a car. “If your car has been sitting in the garage, it doesn't need gas. Loading up on carbohydrates is like trying to fill up a full tank. It just spills over the side. In the human body, that overspill equates to sugar backing up in the blood stream and excess body fat storage.”

      This energy balance is the potential culprit for carbohydrate consumption leading to weight gain at night. In general, an excess binge at night isn’t going to do you any harm provided you’re staying within your total macronutrient needs. The problem is that far too many individuals overload during the day and fail to take that into account at night. According to Miyaki, “Eating too many calories and carbohydrates in general makes you fat. It's the total food intake not the distribution that is the problem.” In fact, one study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition illustrated that carbohydrate consumption may help individuals sleep better during the night – key for individuals suffering from sleep problems. Rather than focusing specifically on the timing, pay attention to your total consumption and keep it within optimal ranges for your particular age, weight, and body composition goals. Carbohydrates aren’t particularly evil during the evening hours. Consumption of excess carbohydrates at any time of the day can lead to weight gain and unwanted changes in body composition.

      Source: http://www.mensfitness.com/training/...eat-before-bed
      Comments 24 Comments
      1. fueledpassion's Avatar
        fueledpassion -
        I eat all the time. Are you referring to considering back-loading? I would try that other than two issues that come up for me:

        1) I need lots and lots of carbs to gain weight and one meal for all my starches is not practical
        2) I would feel like a turd if I moved to backloading and my training would suffer.

        I'm one of those guys that can eat 300-400g carbs every day and still remain @ 10% BF or less. I dont have high body fat issues and as far as I can tell, my body has a superb insulin response.

        What say you?
      1. Tomahawk88's Avatar
        Tomahawk88 -
        Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
        I eat all the time. Are you referring to considering back-loading? I would try that other than two issues that come up for me:

        1) I need lots and lots of carbs to gain weight and one meal for all my starches is not practical
        2) I would feel like a turd if I moved to backloading and my training would suffer.

        I'm one of those guys that can eat 300-400g carbs every day and still remain @ 10% BF or less. I dont have high body fat issues and as far as I can tell, my body has a superb insulin response.

        What say you?
        There are different protocols for the diet. You would obviously do the bulking one for most of the year. Pretty much consists on having lighter carb days on rest days. Ok for the questions 1) there are multiple meals. I personally have 2 and keep my eating within 4 hours of training to try and limit fat gain(body fat is higher than I would like). 2) Your glycogen stores would be plenty full from your previous backload especially if you are density bulking. Even if you have a strenuous job. Another addition would be have intra carbs particularly HBCD. Trust me I train like a mad man following a Mountain Dog(John Meadows, just thought about how dumb it is to have to mention who he is since you link one of his articles from TNation) base routine. Also to be honest CBL works best when body fat is lower than 15%.
      1. hardknock's Avatar
        hardknock -
        Originally Posted by powerman2000 View Post
        I find fault with this article. Eating anything just prior to bed time on a regular basis will at the very least make losing body fat more difficult regardless of total daily calorie intake. Maintaining a 15-16 hour fast after your last meal of the day is crucial for fat loss and keeping a lean physique. At least that is my personal experience. We should all know that while insulin is present in the body, fat burning is impossible. Therefore, the longer we spend sleeping at night with no insulin in the bloodstream the more body fat we will lose. I believe the mantra of needing a Casein protein shake before bed at night to avoid muscle loss is utterly false as well.
        This article, like 90% of them, is talking to the general public that exercises 2-3 days per week and that includes maybe a brisk walk. It is not talking to those of you that are sticking themselves with ghrp, cjc, and anabolics. For the avg person, all things being equal, carbs before bed causes weight gain because those people are not exerting enough energy during the day. For me, i run marathons so carbs before bed mean **** to me. When i was eating carbs and not running, i gained weight but when i started running i lost considerable weight.

        Ive done heavy protein before bed and light weight lifting and gotten fat and ive done heavy protein with explosive lifts and ive gotten massive.

        To put it in simple terms, **** is not one size fits all.
      1. HardCore1's Avatar
        HardCore1 -
        Subbed